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Phil's ramblings, descent into the next ice age occuring now, physics, AGW theory, random disco thread.


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#1081 F. Guimaraes

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Posted 05 December 2013 - 11:12 PM

Arctic Sea Ice Extent is rising once again and global sea ice is nearing a positive anomaly of 1 million squared km.

In fact the Global Sea Ice could reach an  all time high for december in the weeks ahead, it's impressive what happening with the sea ice this year,

screenhunter_291-dec-03-23-59.jpg

http://stevengoddard.../2013/12/04/glo



#1082 F. Guimaraes

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Posted 10 December 2013 - 12:40 AM

Antarctica new record cold temperature,

 

"...Earth set a new record for coldest temperature recorded. It happened in August 2010 when it hit -135.8 degrees. Then on July 31 of this year, it came close again: -135.3 degrees..."

 

 http://news.yahoo.co...--politics.html


coldestplacerecords.png?itok=nAYJEo7W


#1083 WeatherPhil

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Posted 10 December 2013 - 01:21 AM

True, however this was satellite measured..although it was the coldest reading ever recorded in the satellite era regardless.

#1084 luterra

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Posted 10 December 2013 - 12:08 PM

A survey to discover the coldest spot on Earth is interesting but unfortunately says nothing about whether that spot is getting warmer or colder over time.  If we have satellite measurements of that spot over 20+ years then it might be more meaningful.



#1085 WeatherPhil

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Posted 10 December 2013 - 01:53 PM

A survey to discover the coldest spot on Earth is interesting but unfortunately says nothing about whether that spot is getting warmer or colder over time.  If we have satellite measurements of that spot over 20+ years then it might be more meaningful.
We've had satellite temperature measurements over the Antarctic continent since 1979, down to 85S. There is no detectable trend:

497CC536-6D11-48E6-833F-DA592DAE4C13-482

#1086 luterra

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Posted 10 December 2013 - 04:29 PM

Coldest low since 1972 here in Corvallis with -3.4ºF on Sunday morning.  That's especially significant considering that the coldest it's been in the intervening years was 7ºF.  Never thought I would see anything below zero west of the Cascades...



#1087 sometimesdylan

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Posted 10 December 2013 - 05:25 PM

Wow, that is quite impressive. That is a tad colder than our lowest this winter (so far)

#1088 WeatherPhil

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Posted 10 December 2013 - 06:14 PM

The PV has been predominately situated on our side of the pole..first time since 1996 we've seen such a lopsided maximum.

#1089 F. Guimaraes

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Posted 12 December 2013 - 11:02 PM

Big hot blob found at West Antarctica,

http://www.weather.c...ic-ice-20131211

 

but it's still not a smoking gun

"What’s absolutely sure is there’s a big thermal anomaly, a big blob,” said Wiens, a seismologist at Washington University. “What’s less sure is whether that anomaly goes deeper.” The thermal anomaly extends 125 miles (200 kilometers) below Marie Byrd Land, Lloyd said. Below about 255 miles (410 km), where a mantle plume’s trailing tail would also leave a hotter-than-average mark in mantle rocks, there’s little evidence for a rising hotspot, said Erica Emry, a postdoctoral researcher at Pennsylvania State University. “There’s no smoking gun,” Emry said."

 

36122e96-5a35-4af8-9bcd-e9d75f3f4721_650

 

Could that be the reason why West Antarctica is not getting steadily colder as the rest of the continent?

Could a large hot region underneath the surface affect the climate above?



#1090 F. Guimaraes

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Posted 12 December 2013 - 11:04 PM

The PV has been predominately situated on our side of the pole..first time since 1996 we've seen such a lopsided maximum.

 

Is it possible to predict how long it will last?



#1091 Andie/TX

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Posted 13 December 2013 - 01:16 PM




Are there any thermal images on the heated area in the Antarctic ?

.



#1092 luterra

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Posted 13 December 2013 - 01:41 PM

Big hot blob found at West Antarctica,

http://www.weather.c...ic-ice-20131211

 

but it's still not a smoking gun

"What’s absolutely sure is there’s a big thermal anomaly, a big blob,” said Wiens, a seismologist at Washington University. “What’s less sure is whether that anomaly goes deeper.” The thermal anomaly extends 125 miles (200 kilometers) below Marie Byrd Land, Lloyd said. Below about 255 miles (410 km), where a mantle plume’s trailing tail would also leave a hotter-than-average mark in mantle rocks, there’s little evidence for a rising hotspot, said Erica Emry, a postdoctoral researcher at Pennsylvania State University. “There’s no smoking gun,” Emry said."

 

 

 

Could that be the reason why West Antarctica is not getting steadily colder as the rest of the continent?

Could a large hot region underneath the surface affect the climate above?

The several thousand feet of ice over the surface makes for a darn good insulator.

 

Even in the most geothermally-active locations like Iceland and Yellowstone, heat from below has a negligible effect on climate.  So as interesting as an antarctic hot spot is, I am highly skeptical of any effect on surface temps.



#1093 F. Guimaraes

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Posted 21 December 2013 - 09:42 AM

The 2nd greatest anomaly of the Antarctic sea ice, since 1979, was observed yesterday, Dec 20th, 2013,
seaice-anomaly-antarctic-13-12-21-1p699-

 

Greater than 2008 and 2010!

Merry Christmas! :)



#1094 F. Guimaraes

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Posted 21 December 2013 - 10:09 AM

Secondly, are there any thermal images on the heated area in the Antarctic ?

I have no information about thermal images.

 

The several thousand feet of ice over the surface makes for a darn good insulator.

 

Even in the most geothermally-active locations like Iceland and Yellowstone, heat from below has a negligible effect on climate.  So as interesting as an antarctic hot spot is, I am highly skeptical of any effect on surface temps.

 

Thanks, I agree.

I was thinking about some possible "leakage" along the following line.

If there was an "anomaly" on Earth's crust where the magma was directly in contact with the atmosphere, there *would be* large local effects on climate, at least locally, because the magma is a virtually infinite source of large amounts of heat (also, due to the composition of the magma, I think there would be global effects from this imaginary situation.)

Then, if we made a "thought experiment" of burying the magma of this "anomaly", layer by layer, under larger amounts of crustal rock and ice and positioned at the correct point in the Antarctic continent this we'd have a more and more realistic correspondence to the actually observed situation.

Now, if the amount of rock and ice over our "anomaly" is very large, as the observations indicate, then the amount of heat and any other residual gases or material escaping to the atmosphere would be negligible or zero, *unless* there was a connection of this anomaly with some relatively thin crustal region in the neighborhood (probably under the sea, somewhere).

But, until such "shallow region" is found there could be no influence on climate, even locally.

On the other hand, the fact that the hot blob has been found exactly at the only region of Antarctica that is not systematically cooling in the recent decades, seems suspicious.



#1095 WeatherPhil

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Posted 27 December 2013 - 03:26 AM

Finally.

New paper out, validating my theory on the global electric circuit, cloud cover/circulation, and the Solar Wind/Interplanetary Electric Field relationship. The correlation is so clear, I'm not sure how it can be denied by mainstream climate scientists any longer.

http://m.iopscience....326/8/4/045032/

In this letter we investigate possible relationships between the cloud cover (CC) and the interplanetary electric field (IEF), which is modulated by the solar wind speed and the interplanetary magnetic field. We show that CC at midhigh latitudes systematically correlates with positive IEF, which has a clear energetic input into the atmosphere, but not with negative IEF, in general agreement with predictions of the global electric circuit (GEC)-related mechanism. Thus, our results suggest that midhigh latitude clouds might be affected by the solar wind via the GEC. Since IEF responds differently to solar activity than, for instance, cosmic ray flux or solar irradiance, we also show that such a study allows distinguishing one solar-driven mechanism of cloud evolution, via the GEC, from others.

#1096 Andie/TX

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Posted 28 December 2013 - 01:56 PM

Phil, wake up.  Ck your pm's at least monthly !         lol



#1097 WeatherPhil

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Posted 28 December 2013 - 11:28 PM

Sorry. :( I didn't see any PMs from anyone? Maybe try a resend? Something's wrong with my PM system.




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