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Unusual weather trivia that is hard to google

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#501
Scott

Posted 21 May 2018 - 10:51 PM

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September (Colorado) -2 1959 Fraser

 

 

Also at Red Feather Lakes (in the Front Range near the Wyoming border) in 1985.  Lots of impressive September lows happened that month including 17 in Denver, 8 in Cheyenne, and -2 in Laramie.  


At home:

 

Coldest temperature thus far in 2018:   -26 on 2/21

Warmest temperature thus far in 2018:  87 on 5/26

Precip thus far in 2018:   6.17 inches

Snowfall thus far in 2018:   35.7 inches


#502
wx_statman

Posted 22 May 2018 - 08:36 AM

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Yes, impressive summer for records.   Besides Richardson, a lot of Alaskan locations had their record highs in June 1969.  Fairbanks hit 96, which is probably the highest reliable reading for that location.  I believe June 1969 may have more all time high records in Alaska than any other month, though June 2013 may have upset that record (I'd have to check).  

 

It looks like mid-June 1969 has a slight edge in terms of all-time record highs (at least at longer-term stations), when compared to mid-June 2013. However, June 2013 had a second heat wave later in the month that produced a few more all-time records...so the final tally between the two months is probably about even.


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#503
wx_statman

Posted 22 May 2018 - 09:37 AM

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I'm wondering about the RAWS readings up in Alaska during the mid-June 2004 heat wave. Thorne Bay hit 101 on 6/18, and Helm hit 99 on 6/19. These are the same RAWS stations that hit 76 in March 2016, so it seems as though they're especially favored for downslope warming. The June 2004 heat wave had credible readings of 93 in Annette (all-time record) and 98 at Mayo Road in the Yukon, which appears to be the all-time record for the Yukon Territory (thanks to "Glacier" for digging up this info and posting it a couple years ago on this forum). Both Tok & Tok School COOP's hit 96 during that heat wave, and Eagle reached 94. It's certainly possible that downslope warming would have produced readings close to 100 in favored spots. 

 

It's very possible that the 101 @ Thorne Bay on 6/18/2004 represents the highest reliably measured maximum in Alaskan history. That's assuming there was a downslope breeze blowing to ventilate the thermistor, and that it was properly calibrated to begin with. Good reasons for this reading to be unofficial, as all RAWS readings are, but it does make me wonder. 

 

None of the 100's measured at old COOP's in Alaska are reliable, it isn't even a question in my opinion. We have:

 

104 on 6/7/1936 @ Ruby

102 on 6/26/1916 @ Camp #6

100 on 6/20/1915 @ Anchorage

100 on 6/27/1915 @ Fort Yukon

100 on 7/30/1907 @ Teikhill

 

In addition:

 

99 on 7/28/1919 @ University Exp. Station (aka Fairbanks)

99 on 7/28/1915 @ Klukwan

98 on 6/17/1936 @ Nenana

 

All of these readings are clearly over-exposed, in my opinion. It's funny that the Fort Yukon reading got singled out and placed on a pedestal as the state record - when it was just one of many unreliable readings in Alaska from that era. Why not go with the 104 at Ruby or the 102 at Camp #6, if we're sticking with bogus COOP readings? 

 

The most reliable candidates that we have are:

 

99 on 8/1/1976 @ Tenakee Springs COOP (possibly occurred on 7/31)

98 on 7/31/1976 @ Haines Airport

98 on 6/16/1969 @ Richardson COOP

 

Also of note, the June 2013 heat wave produced 98 at both Bentalit Lodge Snotel & Bentalit RAWS, as well as 97 at Amber Lake COOP. 

 

 

 



#504
wx_statman

Posted 22 May 2018 - 09:44 AM

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https://www.infoplea...rature-extremes

 

For Alaska, I can add these (preliminary) candidates right away:

 

JAN: 66 in 2018 (Annette & Metlakatla 6S)

MAY: 92 in 1947 (Fort Wainwright & Eielson Field), in addition to 92 in 1960 at Ladd AFB

JUN: 98 in 1969 (Richardson)

OCT: 76 in 2003 (Dry Creek, Fairbanks 9ENE, Delta Junction 20SE)

 

Also, Allakaket hit -68 in March 1911, in addition to -68 in Kobuk in March 1971. 


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#505
Scott

Posted 22 May 2018 - 10:13 AM

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It's very possible that the 101 @ Thorne Bay on 6/18/2004 represents the highest reliably measured maximum in Alaskan history. That's assuming there was a downslope breeze blowing to ventilate the thermistor, and that it was properly calibrated to begin with. Good reasons for this reading to be unofficial, as all RAWS readings are, but it does make me wonder.


It seems that it may have been overexposed or under ventilated. There are several weather stations in the vicinity. The next highest reading I can find is 92 at Klawok Airport on 6/20/2004? Were there any higher than this?

It's funny that the Fort Yukon reading got singled out and placed on a pedestal as the state record - when it was just one of many unreliable readings in Alaska from that era. Why not go with the 104 at Ruby or the 102 at Camp #6, if we're sticking with bogus COOP readings?


I also think the Fort Yukon reading was over exposed, but at least FY is in a location that could see temperatures near 100 (unlike the 100 reported in Anchorage). Unfortunately, the Fort Yukon station stopped operating in 1990. It would have been interesting see see what the station would have read during some of the impressive heat waves since 1990.



99 on 8/1/1976 @ Tenakee Springs COOP (possibly occurred on 7/31)

98 on 7/31/1976 @ Haines Airport

98 on 6/16/1969 @ Richardson COOP



I still go with the 98 at Richardson myself. The Haines reading might be accurate, but is still a bit of a stretch in my opinion. I just don't see the 99 at Tenakee Springs, even with down sloping. None of the other weather stations (there are several) in the vicinity have even gotten close to 99. The next highest reading I know of was the 88 at Sitka (which is still very impressive for the location).

---------------------------------------------------------

Anyway, Livengood Alaska has an official all time high of 91 on 4/3/1965. I wonder how that one slipped through the cracks and is still on record? I remember seeing it in a weather almanac decades ago and before the internet existed. I wonder why it wasn't purged long ago, especially when the data was converted to digital.

At home:

 

Coldest temperature thus far in 2018:   -26 on 2/21

Warmest temperature thus far in 2018:  87 on 5/26

Precip thus far in 2018:   6.17 inches

Snowfall thus far in 2018:   35.7 inches


#506
BLI snowman

Posted 22 May 2018 - 10:21 AM

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1944-1945 had 89.9 inches, which is above normal, but not off the charts.

 

You may be thinking of the 1950's?  They had two very high snow years.    105.5 inches in 1951-1952 and 166.5 inches in 1955-1956. At the time, the 1955-1956 season was close to record breaking, but then the 1970-1971 came and shattered all records with 141.5.

 

That still wouldn't explain why no such outlying occurrences were recorded before the early 1940's or after the early 1950's in the same location (unless the weather station was moved significantly).  For sure the station has been in close to the same location since 1940.   

 

The COOP station is only about one mile from the airport station.  

Before and after that time period, the cold snaps at Portland align nicely and so does the collaboration with other stations.

 

Anyway, I did find some collaboration on the 3/1950 reading.   Belfast, also on the coast recorded a -18 in 3/1950.

 

 

In regards to 2/1943, Brunswick, ME did report a -35 minimum on 2/16. The Portland reading seems low, but it was likely at least in the neighborhood of being correct.


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#507
wx_statman

Posted 22 May 2018 - 02:13 PM

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It seems that it may have been overexposed or under ventilated.  There are several weather stations in the vicinity.  The next highest reading I can find is 92 at Klawok Airport on 6/20/2004?  Were there any higher than this?

 

None that I can see. Downsloping can be highly localized though...I'm always hesitant to outright dismiss high readings in downsloping zones, unless the high pressure ridge in place clearly doesn't support those readings.

 

I also think the Fort Yukon reading was over exposed, but at least FY is in a location that could see temperatures near 100 (unlike the 100 reported in Anchorage).   Unfortunately, the Fort Yukon station stopped operating in 1990.  It would have been interesting see see what the station would have read during some of the impressive heat waves since 1990.

 

 

Yeah, it's a shame that station went offline. They also went offline in early January 1934, right before the big cold wave that supposedly dropped that area to -78 (when Fairbanks hit -66). They came back online in 1938. Fort Yukon has what I consider a legitimate 97 degree reading on the books, on 7/25/1955. 

 

By the way, a newer station does exist in Fort Yukon. Its maximum happened to occur during the June 2004 heat wave, but only 90 degrees. It's possible that this particular spot in town has different microclimate tendencies than the other location, where the original station was located. 

 

I still go with the 98 at Richardson myself.  The Haines reading might be accurate, but is still a bit of a stretch in my opinion.  I just don't see the 99 at Tenakee Springs, even with down sloping.  None of the other weather stations (there are several) in the vicinity have even gotten close to 99.

 

 

I have the same reasoning here as with the June 2004 readings. It's hard to dismiss downslope maximums due to their highly localized nature. But yeah, this could have certainly been a bogus reading just the same. If I had to apply any sort of statistical rigor, I would probably dismiss the Tenakee Springs reading. Since it does stick out so much.

 

Basically, I would apply the same logic that ACIS uses in their QC algorithm. The 99 at Tenakee Springs was QC'd out and no longer appears in the WRCC database (or xmACIS monthly summaries) for that reason. It sucks to see extreme readings removed from a weather hobbyist perspective, especially ones which may have actually been legitimate, but it's the appropriate thing to do from a scientific/statistical analysis perspective. 

 

So yeah, long story short, you're probably right that the 99 @ Tenakee Springs needs to be dismissed/asterisked. 


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#508
Scott

Posted 22 May 2018 - 07:37 PM

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In regards to 2/1943, Brunswick, ME did report a -35 minimum on 2/16. The Portland reading seems low, but it was likely at least in the neighborhood of being correct.

 

Yes, I'll think I'll just admit that Portland really did hit -39 in 2/1943.


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At home:

 

Coldest temperature thus far in 2018:   -26 on 2/21

Warmest temperature thus far in 2018:  87 on 5/26

Precip thus far in 2018:   6.17 inches

Snowfall thus far in 2018:   35.7 inches


#509
Scott

Posted 22 May 2018 - 08:25 PM

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So yeah, long story short, you're probably right that the 99 @ Tenakee Springs needs to be dismissed/asterisked

 

 

I wonder what the high in August would be if the Tanakee Springs reading is dismissed.   This is more complicated than it should be.

I did find the highest reading recorded in Alaska though.   Eielson Visitor Center high 140 in 8/2005, making this the highest reading on earth!  It should be the true state record.

 

Anyway,  Matanuska Valley 16 supposedly record a 98 on 8/6/1966, but this seems very dubious.  The next highest Alaska reading was 85.

McKinley River (RAWS) had a 98 in 8/1995, but this one is not valid.   No other readings in Alaska were above 83 that month.   

 

Haines supposedly had a 95 on 8/1/1978, but looking through the data, I really believe that the Haines station may have had over-exposed readings between 1976 and 1978.   Haines had several readings in the low to mid 90's in August those years and then none since then.  Though they did happen during known warm spells, they don't seem that well collaborated with other stations.  I wouldn't rule them out completely, but I'm guessing that the readings were probably over exposed by at least a few degrees.  Other places in interior Alaska did get almost or as warm though, so there is is a possibility that they might be valid. 

 

Mankomen Lake supposedly record a 94 on 8/12/2005, but the record high in July is only 84.   There were a lot of high readings in 8/1995 though, so maybe some are valid.  It seems like this one might be valid.  

 

Some high readings (Some were mentioned earlier):

Upper Tsaina River Snotel = 99

Thorne Bay RAWS = 95

Maybe some are valid?  Which ones though?  It's hard to say, especially with RAWS and Snotels.

 

At least three locations have recorded temperature of 93 in August: 

 

College Observatory on 8/6/1994 

Eagle on 8/6/1977

Tok on 8/6/1994
 

These are almost certainly valid.  
 


At home:

 

Coldest temperature thus far in 2018:   -26 on 2/21

Warmest temperature thus far in 2018:  87 on 5/26

Precip thus far in 2018:   6.17 inches

Snowfall thus far in 2018:   35.7 inches


#510
wx_statman

Posted 22 May 2018 - 09:11 PM

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Haines supposedly had a 95 on 8/1/1978, but looking through the data, I really believe that the Haines station may have had over-exposed readings between 1976 and 1978.   Haines had several readings in the low to mid 90's in August those years and then none since then.  Though they did happen during known warm spells, they don't seem that well collaborated with other stations.  I wouldn't rule them out completely, but I'm guessing that the readings were probably over exposed by at least a few degrees.  Other places in interior Alaska did get almost or as warm though, so there is is a possibility that they might be valid. 

 

Good info on Haines. I wasn't aware of the possible issues at that station. Good thing you checked...I got lazy!

 

Indeed, something weird was happening at Haines in the 1970s. They hit 93+ in 4 straight years (1975-78), and never once since then. That's odd. Either the station was moved or the equipment was fixed/better sheltered after 1978. Very unlikely that all those 1970's readings were valid, even though they occurred during known heat waves. 

 

Regarding the "real" August record for Alaska, here are the most-likely-to-be-reliable candidates IMO (from official stations):

 

94 on 8/1/1976 @ Copper Center

93 on 8/6/1994 @ Tok

93 on 8/5/1994 @ Clearwater

93 on 8/5/1994 @ Fairbanks Int'l

93 on 8/6/1994 @ College Observatory

93 on 8/5/2017 @ Skagway Airport

 

There's a chance the Copper Center reading was actually recorded on 7/31. I would need to look into it. 

 

The Mankomen Lake reading from 2005 looks iffy, although Haines 40NW did hit 92 on 8/13/2005. Honorable mention - North Pole COOP had an impressively late 92 on 8/15/2010, along with two other COOP's hitting 92 that day (Ester 5NE & Aurora).


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#511
wx_statman

Posted 22 May 2018 - 09:23 PM

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BTW, Scott & Erik (and anyone else who might be interested) - it just dawned on me today that I can easily run a monthly extremes report in xmACIS for any given state, for any month. Maybe you guys have already figured it out? Either way, on the xmACIS site (http://xmacis.rcc-acis.org/):

 

-go to multi-station

-then multi-station extremes

-set stations active to por-2018

-set analysis period to por-2018

-choose your variable

-set length of period to 1 day (highest avg for a day = the record high!)

-choose highest or lowest

-click more options

-use restrict date range to set whatever period you wish

-sort ascending/descending, etc. It's cool to sort by year too to see which records are the newest, which are the oldest, etc. 

-you can sort by state, county, CWA, climate zone, etc. 

 

I just did that for AK for 8/1 to 8/31 in order to isolate the highest temperatures for Aug. Worked like a charm! Should greatly help in looking up monthly extremes for each state. The only downside is that this approach won't capture readings that have been flagged and QC'd out. You'd still need to check the original state monthly climo reports to corroborate those. 


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#512
Scott

Posted 22 May 2018 - 09:59 PM

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Indeed, something weird was happening at Haines in the 1970s. They hit 93+ in 4 straight years (1975-78), and never once since then. That's odd. Either the station was moved or the equipment was fixed/better sheltered after 1978. Very unlikely that all those 1970's readings were valid, even though they occurred during known heat waves. 

 

 

The station looks like it was in the same location since 1973 at least, so I would guess that it would be the equipment.


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At home:

 

Coldest temperature thus far in 2018:   -26 on 2/21

Warmest temperature thus far in 2018:  87 on 5/26

Precip thus far in 2018:   6.17 inches

Snowfall thus far in 2018:   35.7 inches


#513
wx_statman

Posted 24 May 2018 - 05:28 PM

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I looked at Feb. in Alaska. Was wondering if the 66 from 1992 @ Petersburg was the real monthly record or not, considering AK just hit 66 at two locations this past January...February should theoretically produce warmer readings than January. 

 

Nope. The (most-likely-to-be-reliable) candidates are:

 

66 on 2/27/1992 @ Petersburg

65 on 2/27/1992 @ Wrangell

65 on 2/9/1993 @ Annette

 

It looks like the Jan. 2018 warm spell was just really anomalous. 



#514
wx_statman

Posted 24 May 2018 - 06:06 PM

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April was worth a look, and July as well.

 

For April, the 82 @ Annette in 1976 still looks like the real monthly record. The (most-likely-to-be-reliable) candidates are:

 

82 on 4/29/1976 @ Annette

81 on 4/24/2005 @ Klawock

79 on 4/29/1976 @ Sitka

 

July is a question mark now, since apparently Haines wasn't a reliable station in the 1970s. The (most-likely-to-be-reliable) candidates for July are:

 

97 on 7/25/1955 @ Fort Yukon

96 on 7/9/2009 @ Glennallen

 

(actually, the Glennallen reading looks suspect now that I've taken a closer look)

 

Fort Yukon is the likely record, IMO. Other readings on 7/25/1955 were 95 @ Ladd AFB, 94 all the way up at Allakaket, and 93 @ Fairbanks. 


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#515
Scott

Posted 24 May 2018 - 09:13 PM

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I looked at Feb. in Alaska. Was wondering if the 66 from 1992 @ Petersburg was the real monthly record or not, considering AK just hit 66 at two locations this past January...February should theoretically produce warmer readings than January. 

 

 

This brings up a curiosity that I have had.  It is actually common for locations in Alaska to have higher records in January than in February, March, November, and December.   While this may be expected in places like St Paul Island, Barrow, or Prudhoe Bay, it is common all over Alaska.  I haven't gone through all the WRCC basis, but before the internet existed, I hand copied all the station records I could find for Alaska using sources at the library.

 

I had a total of 51 stations.  Here are the months that had the lowest monthly record high for the stations:

 

January = 8  lowest monthly record highs

February = 10 lowest monthly record highs

March = 5 lowest monthly record highs

November = 3 lowest monthly record highs

December = 25 lowest monthly record highs

 

I don't know why it is so common for January to have higher record highs than February, March, November, and December, but it is.  You would think that it might be one or two state wide warm spells tipping the balance, but it isn't.  

 

This is true in all parts of Alaska.  Here are random examples from most regions of the state:
 

Attached File  Anchorage.JPG   131.38KB   0 downloads

 

Attached File  Barrow.JPG   131.14KB   0 downloads

Attached File  Bethel.JPG   142.81KB   0 downloads

Attached File  Bettles.JPG   121.64KB   0 downloads

Attached File  Fairbanks.JPG   126.92KB   0 downloads

Attached File  Juneau.JPG   126.42KB   0 downloads

Attached File  McGrath.JPG   124.32KB   0 downloads
 

These aren't isolated anomalies either and it seems to be at least as common as not.

 


At home:

 

Coldest temperature thus far in 2018:   -26 on 2/21

Warmest temperature thus far in 2018:  87 on 5/26

Precip thus far in 2018:   6.17 inches

Snowfall thus far in 2018:   35.7 inches


#516
wx_statman

Posted 24 May 2018 - 09:55 PM

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This brings up a curiosity that I have had.  It is actually common for locations in Alaska to have higher records in January than in February, March, November, and December.   While this may be expected in places like St Paul Island, Barrow, or Prudhoe Bay, it is common all over Alaska.  I haven't gone through all the WRCC basis, but before the internet existed, I hand copied all the station records I could find for Alaska using sources at the library.

 

I had a total of 51 stations.  Here are the months that had the lowest monthly record high for the stations:

 

January = 8  lowest monthly record highs

February = 10 lowest monthly record highs

March = 5 lowest monthly record highs

November = 3 lowest monthly record highs

December = 25 lowest monthly record highs

 

I don't know why it is so common for January to have higher record highs than February, March, November, and December, but it is.  You would think that it might be one or two state wide warm spells tipping the balance, but it isn't.  

 

This is true in all parts of Alaska.  Here are random examples from most regions of the state:
 

attachicon.gifAnchorage.JPG

 

attachicon.gifBarrow.JPG

attachicon.gifBethel.JPG

attachicon.gifBettles.JPG

attachicon.gifFairbanks.JPG

attachicon.gifJuneau.JPG

attachicon.gifMcGrath.JPG
 

These aren't isolated anomalies either and it seems to be at least as common as not.

 

 

That's interesting. I've noticed it before to some degree. I'm not sure what process explains this pattern either. I.e., why would warm air advection over Alaska be preferred in January over December or February? Slightly different storm tracks? Downstream/upstream jet stream configurations? Your guess is as good as mine. 



#517
BLI snowman

Posted 24 May 2018 - 10:20 PM

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That's interesting. I've noticed it before to some degree. I'm not sure what process explains this pattern either. I.e., why would warm air advection over Alaska be preferred in January over December or February? Slightly different storm tracks? Downstream/upstream jet stream configurations? Your guess is as good as mine. 

 

January seems to just have a penchant for delivering the most significant upper level blocks in the modern era. Take 2009, 1981, or 1961. Massive full latitude ridges that brought really extreme height anomalies to all of the West Coast.


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#518
Scott

Posted 24 May 2018 - 10:24 PM

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I'm not sure what process explains this pattern either. I.e., why would warm air advection over Alaska be preferred in January over December or February? Slightly different storm tracks? Downstream/upstream jet stream configurations? Your guess is as good as mine

 

 

I don't know, but it is strange.  In places like Barrow, it can be expected that January would often get warmer than February, but even then why December? 

Barrow Airport has risen above freezing (33 or above) 5 years in January, 2 years in February, 2 years in March, and 1 year in December.

 

The only area that I can think of a good explanation is the Yukon River Valley (including Fairbanks).  While January averages the coldest month, most or all of the warm spells come from Chinooks off the Alaska Range.  All winter months are probably equally prone to Chinooks.  Still, it is interesting that January is the only month between November and February that it has risen above 50 in more than one year. 

 

January seems to just have a penchant for delivering the most significant upper level blocks in the modern era.

 

True, but why?


At home:

 

Coldest temperature thus far in 2018:   -26 on 2/21

Warmest temperature thus far in 2018:  87 on 5/26

Precip thus far in 2018:   6.17 inches

Snowfall thus far in 2018:   35.7 inches


#519
BLI snowman

Posted 24 May 2018 - 11:10 PM

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True, but why?

January seems to just have a penchant for delivering the most significant upper level blocks in the modern era.

 

 

Better atmospheric and tropical forcings at that stage (mid-season), I would imagine. It's a relatively stable month from that standpoint with less inter-seasonal/solar transition, so things are really able to pop out when the conditions allow for it.

 

Historically January has definitely had the most dramatic swings across a large swath of Western North America.

 

Fairbanks is actually a great example. Their warmest January mean on record is 18.1 in 1981 and their coldest is -31.2 in 1934. That's a pretty stunning 49.1 degree spread. 

 

February on the other hand only has a 41.2 degree spread (15.9 in 1980 versus -25.3 in 1979). December has even less range with 37.2 (9.0 in 2017 versus -28.2 in 1956).

 

So January easily has the greatest range, warmest extreme, and coldest extreme. It seems to indicate that it's a month in which well rooted atmospheric blocking makes all the difference.



#520
erik1974

Posted 26 May 2018 - 05:58 AM

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Also at Red Feather Lakes (in the Front Range near the Wyoming border) in 1985.  Lots of impressive September lows happened that month including 17 in Denver, 8 in Cheyenne, and -2 in Laramie.  

       Thanks for the info Scott.  I will add to my list.



#521
OKwx2k4

Posted 27 May 2018 - 08:48 PM

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On Alaska, could the questionable readings be possible due to the great climate shift of the late 70s? It's just a thought. Been pretty solidly in a different climate era since then with the exception of a few huge ridging episodes in this decade but most of those occurred in winter months. Just my thoughts on maybe why they haven't been repeated since.

#522
Scott

Posted 29 May 2018 - 02:43 PM

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On Alaska, could the questionable readings be possible due to the great climate shift of the late 70s? It's just a thought. Been pretty solidly in a different climate era since then with the exception of a few huge ridging episodes in this decade but most of those occurred in winter months. Just my thoughts on maybe why they haven't been repeated since.

 

Which ones are you referring to?  These ones?

 

None of the 100's measured at old COOP's in Alaska are reliable, it isn't even a question in my opinion. We have:

 

104 on 6/7/1936 @ Ruby

102 on 6/26/1916 @ Camp #6

100 on 6/20/1915 @ Anchorage

100 on 6/27/1915 @ Fort Yukon

100 on 7/30/1907 @ Teikhill

 

No, I don't think they are due to a shift in climate.  The 100 in Anchorage, for example just isn't plausible climate shift or not.  


At home:

 

Coldest temperature thus far in 2018:   -26 on 2/21

Warmest temperature thus far in 2018:  87 on 5/26

Precip thus far in 2018:   6.17 inches

Snowfall thus far in 2018:   35.7 inches


#523
OKwx2k4

Posted 29 May 2018 - 03:56 PM

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Which ones are you referring to? These ones?

None of the 100's measured at old COOP's in Alaska are reliable, it isn't even a question in my opinion. We have:


104 on 6/7/1936 @ Ruby

102 on 6/26/1916 @ Camp #6

100 on 6/20/1915 @ Anchorage

100 on 6/27/1915 @ Fort Yukon

100 on 7/30/1907 @ Teikhill


No, I don't think they are due to a shift in climate. The 100 in Anchorage, for example just isn't plausible climate shift or not.


Nope. You're right. Not even a question at all. Carry on!

#524
wx_statman

Posted 30 May 2018 - 11:13 AM

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Nope. You're right. Not even a question at all. Carry on!

 

There's no physical reason for Alaskan temps hitting 100 degrees back in the early 20th century....and not doing it in the last 50+ years. If that's what you're wondering. The climate there is warming. The only plausible explanation is that thermometers back in the old days weren't properly sheltered. So those 100 degree readings aren't real shade temperatures. 



#525
OKwx2k4

Posted 30 May 2018 - 12:54 PM

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A couple of the temps I was thinking of were the Haines readings between 1976-78. If you have clarified that they were most likely overexposed, then that is fine. My thoughts were that it factually does fit with a climate pattern that was actually in play during that era. Would've coincided well with the climate shift over the NPAC.

#526
wx_statman

Posted 30 May 2018 - 02:45 PM

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A couple of the temps I was thinking of were the Haines readings between 1976-78. If you have clarified that they were most likely overexposed, then that is fine. My thoughts were that it factually does fit with a climate pattern that was actually in play during that era. Would've coincided well with the climate shift over the NPAC.

 

The coincident timing to the PDO flip in 1976-77 is interesting, for sure. 



#527
OKwx2k4

Posted 30 May 2018 - 11:32 PM

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Can someone tell me where to find the climate maps like NCDC anomalies maps for the US?

#528
Scott

Posted 31 May 2018 - 04:26 PM

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A couple of the temps I was thinking of were the Haines readings between 1976-78. If you have clarified that they were most likely overexposed, then that is fine

 

 

I'd say overexposed.

 

Between 1976 and 1979 Haines was at or near the top of the list when it came to warm temperatures in Alaska in the summer months.  From 1980 onward, it drops way down the list and doesn't have anywhere close to the warmest readings in Alaska for any summer month.  There was definitely something going on with the weather station during that time period.    


At home:

 

Coldest temperature thus far in 2018:   -26 on 2/21

Warmest temperature thus far in 2018:  87 on 5/26

Precip thus far in 2018:   6.17 inches

Snowfall thus far in 2018:   35.7 inches


#529
erik1974

Posted 31 May 2018 - 04:39 PM

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   We seem to have Alaska pretty well settled now.  Someome asked about Montana, so here is my version:

 

Jan 79 1919 Choteau   -60 1963 West Yellowstone (-70 at Rogers Pass in 1954 is questionable)

Feb 79 1932 Columbus   -66 1933 West Yellowstone

Mar 88 1910 Miles City   -45 1906, 1897 Fort Logan, Glasgow

Apr 97 1980, 1939 Poplar, Winfried   -30 1935 Summit

May 105 1937 Rock Springs   -5 1954 Polebridge

June 112 2002, 1988 Baker, Wolf Point   11 1943 Kings Hill

July 117 1937 Medicine Lake   15 1919 Bowen

Aug 112 1961 Iliad   5 1910 Bowen

Sept 107 2003, 1983, 1950 Ridgway, Poplar, Jordan/Garland   -9 1926 West Yellowstone

Oct 99 2011, 1910 Melstone, Springbrook   -30 1935 Summit

Nov 85 1975 Grassrange   -53 1959 Lincoln 14NE

Dec 78 1939 Crow Agency/Grassrange   -59 1924 West Yellowstone

    The 117 reading at Medicine Lake has been questioned recently.  It may or may not be legit.  What about 117 degree reading at Glendive in 1893??



#530
Scott

Posted 31 May 2018 - 10:11 PM

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The 117 reading at Medicine Lake has been questioned recently.  It may or may not be legit.  What about 117 degree reading at Glendive in 1893??

 

 

I'd say both are questionable, but not entirely impossible.   Both seem overexposed in relation to other readings in Montana during those two heat waves.

 

Personally, I believe  that these 113's are all plausible:

 

Hysham 25 SSE on 7/15/2002

Garland on 7/17/1923

Miles City on 7/16/1966

Culbertson on 7/5/1937

Glasgow on 7/31/1900

The 115 at Outlook on 7/5/1937 seems a little overexposed compared to the surrounding areas.  Same with the 114 at Radersburg on 7/13/1896. 

 

It is also interesting that there have been no readings below 11 in Montana in June.  

 

 5 1910 Bowen

 

 

Hegben Dam as well.  


At home:

 

Coldest temperature thus far in 2018:   -26 on 2/21

Warmest temperature thus far in 2018:  87 on 5/26

Precip thus far in 2018:   6.17 inches

Snowfall thus far in 2018:   35.7 inches


#531
erik1974

Posted 01 June 2018 - 09:09 AM

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BTW, Scott & Erik (and anyone else who might be interested) - it just dawned on me today that I can easily run a monthly extremes report in xmACIS for any given state, for any month. Maybe you guys have already figured it out? Either way, on the xmACIS site (http://xmacis.rcc-acis.org/):

 

-go to multi-station

-then multi-station extremes

-set stations active to por-2018

-set analysis period to por-2018

-choose your variable

-set length of period to 1 day (highest avg for a day = the record high!)

-choose highest or lowest

-click more options

-use restrict date range to set whatever period you wish

-sort ascending/descending, etc. It's cool to sort by year too to see which records are the newest, which are the oldest, etc. 

-you can sort by state, county, CWA, climate zone, etc. 

 

I just did that for AK for 8/1 to 8/31 in order to isolate the highest temperatures for Aug. Worked like a charm! Should greatly help in looking up monthly extremes for each state. The only downside is that this approach won't capture readings that have been flagged and QC'd out. You'd still need to check the original state monthly climo reports to corroborate those. 

     Thanks for the info WxStatsman!  Will be checking out various states east of Rockies for dubious readings in the next few weeks.


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#532
Phil

Posted 14 June 2018 - 11:24 PM

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There's no physical reason for Alaskan temps hitting 100 degrees back in the early 20th century....and not doing it in the last 50+ years. If that's what you're wondering. The climate there is warming. The only plausible explanation is that thermometers back in the old days weren't properly sheltered. So those 100 degree readings aren't real shade temperatures.


Well, a cooler global climate, by itself, wouldn’t preclude 100*F from occurring if the large scale circulation was different.

That said, I do agree with you here, because there has been a definite eastward migration of the North American cold vortex over the last three centuries, which has resulted in dramatic warming across western North America and northeast Siberia, even relative to the rest of the planet.
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