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Unusual weather trivia that is hard to google

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#551
wx_statman

Posted 02 September 2018 - 10:07 AM

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I'll take Indiana off the list. I just don't see how it could happen, but it's interesting how many meteorologist accept the report. Perhaps they didn't look at the temperature reports that day.

I also wonder about the Pennsylvania reports as well. The temperatures for the 1918 event seem too high. I don't see and reports of temperatures below the 50's.

Could hail have been reported as snow?

 

It's certainly possible. That seems to have happened a lot back in the day. Still happens a lot today for that matter.



#552
wx_statman

Posted 02 September 2018 - 10:23 AM

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It wouldn’t shock me if it snowed in the highlands of PA in July back then. The highest elevations of the Appalachians have come pretty close to getting snow even in modern times. Upslope flow/orographic lifting provides both a cooling and moisture source.

 

I agree that higher parts of PA probably saw legitimate snowfall in July in the old days. It would have been an extremely rare event, but it was certainly plausible in my opinion. 

 

Even in modern times, Coudersport (1,650') saw a high of 52 on July 5, 1979 during a notably cold July airmass that affected the Midwest. Go up to 3,200 feet ASL on Mount Davis, introduce a colder 19th century airmass (feeding off a more persistent, later-lasting snowcover to the north), and bring in steady precip during the morning hours. It may have happened.


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#553
Scott

Posted 03 September 2018 - 06:10 PM

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I agree that higher parts of PA probably saw legitimate snowfall in July in the old days. 

 

Probably, but the one on 7/2/1918 seems a bit of a stretch.

 

The highest point in Bradford County is 2450 feet and even in 1918 there were many weather stations in the area ranging in elevation of up to 1760 feet, only about 700 feet below the highest elevation in the county.

 

The coldest weather station on that day (Ridgeway) had a high of 73 and a low of 46.  Most stations had lows in the 50's or lower 60's.

 

700 feet doesn't seem enough elevation to produce temperatures cold enough to produce snow, but it can snow at such temperatures on rare occasions.  Perhaps possible, but at least a bit of a stretch.  

 

There weren't enough stations around in 1859 to make a judgement. 


At home:

 

Coldest temperature thus far in 2018:   -26 on 2/21

 

Warmest temperature thus far in 2018:  99 on 7/8 (All time record high)

 

Precip thus far in 2018:   11.01 inches

 

Snowfall thus far in 2018:   38.7 inches

 

Last frost of early summer:  7/1

 

First frost of late summer:  8/29

 

Last snow of late spring:  5/1 

 

First snow of early fall:   10/6


#554
Phil

Posted 03 September 2018 - 07:06 PM

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It also depends on conditions aloft. Cold ULLs w/ 850mb temperatures well below zero would still produce highs well into in the 50s or low 60s in July (given the depth of the mixing layer) yet such a scenario could easily produce wet snow with some elevation, cold core convection, and orographic lifting cooling the surface boundary layer.

I was driving through Martinsburg during the month of May a few years back (during the 2013-14 period IIRC). It was around 60 degrees with a very hard NW wind (under a deep 500mb trough). A squall then blew through..it started as rain, flipped to sleet/graupel, then flipped to fluffy snow, despite the warm temps.

I’ll bet you the ridgetop areas from NY/PA to WV/NC all saw snowfall during July back in the 18th/19th centuries.
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#555
Scott

Posted 03 September 2018 - 07:14 PM

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It still seems a stretch for the 1918 date, but remotely possible.

 

Anyway, the official record snow for the state of Pennsylvania in June is only a trace (and zero in July and August), but I believe June 1816 did see accumulated snowfall in parts of the state.

 

http://climate.met.p...taterecords.php

 

Of course there isn't a weather station on the highest peaks.  


At home:

 

Coldest temperature thus far in 2018:   -26 on 2/21

 

Warmest temperature thus far in 2018:  99 on 7/8 (All time record high)

 

Precip thus far in 2018:   11.01 inches

 

Snowfall thus far in 2018:   38.7 inches

 

Last frost of early summer:  7/1

 

First frost of late summer:  8/29

 

Last snow of late spring:  5/1 

 

First snow of early fall:   10/6


#556
Phil

Posted 03 September 2018 - 07:24 PM

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It still seems a stretch, but remotely possible.

Anyway, the official record snow for the state of Pennsylvania in June is only a trace (and zero in July and August), but I believe June 1816 did see accumulated snowfall in parts of the state.

http://climate.met.p...taterecords.php

Of course there isn't a weather station on the highest peaks either.


I’ll have to look at the topography at the location in question before I jump to conclusions, but I know this region pretty well...it would not shock me (at all) if locations above ~ 1500ft in W-PA/WV saw snow in July in the 18th/19th centuries.

It snows regularly in the late May/early June timeframe down into WV even today. It’s snowed in May at Snowcrest during each of the last 7 years.

Nowadays it’s a huge challenge to see snow in July given the warmer climate and broad z-cells/+NAM background state, but back in those waning LIA years, things were quite different.
Personal Weather Station, Live Stream on Wunderground: https://www.wundergr...pwsdash#history

#557
Scott

Posted 03 September 2018 - 07:43 PM

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I’ll have to look at the topography at the location in question before I jump to conclusions, but I know this region pretty well...it would not shock me (at all) if locations above ~ 1500ft in W-PA/WV saw snow in July in the 18th/19th centuries.

 

 

I could see it on the highest peaks on some days, but 7/2/1918 seems a stretch given the records for that day.   1816 is a good candidate for snow in July. 

 

It snows regularly in the late May/early June timeframe down into WV even today. 

 

 

It snows here until mid-June at times, but never in July.  Late May and early June is more common.   


At home:

 

Coldest temperature thus far in 2018:   -26 on 2/21

 

Warmest temperature thus far in 2018:  99 on 7/8 (All time record high)

 

Precip thus far in 2018:   11.01 inches

 

Snowfall thus far in 2018:   38.7 inches

 

Last frost of early summer:  7/1

 

First frost of late summer:  8/29

 

Last snow of late spring:  5/1 

 

First snow of early fall:   10/6


#558
Scott

Posted 04 September 2018 - 05:41 PM

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Perhaps this question is too easy, but which US state has it's all time record high in both June and September?


At home:

 

Coldest temperature thus far in 2018:   -26 on 2/21

 

Warmest temperature thus far in 2018:  99 on 7/8 (All time record high)

 

Precip thus far in 2018:   11.01 inches

 

Snowfall thus far in 2018:   38.7 inches

 

Last frost of early summer:  7/1

 

First frost of late summer:  8/29

 

Last snow of late spring:  5/1 

 

First snow of early fall:   10/6


#559
Scott

Posted 09 September 2018 - 07:31 PM

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Perhaps this question is too easy, but which US state has it's all time record high in both June and September?

 

The answer was South Carolina for anyone interested.


At home:

 

Coldest temperature thus far in 2018:   -26 on 2/21

 

Warmest temperature thus far in 2018:  99 on 7/8 (All time record high)

 

Precip thus far in 2018:   11.01 inches

 

Snowfall thus far in 2018:   38.7 inches

 

Last frost of early summer:  7/1

 

First frost of late summer:  8/29

 

Last snow of late spring:  5/1 

 

First snow of early fall:   10/6


#560
Scott

Posted 09 September 2018 - 07:32 PM

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Here's another question just for fun.   

 

Which locations have glaciers in places that seldom have snow fall?  I can think of a few.  They are outside the US though.  Some are obvious, while some are surprising.  The reasons are different for different locations. 


At home:

 

Coldest temperature thus far in 2018:   -26 on 2/21

 

Warmest temperature thus far in 2018:  99 on 7/8 (All time record high)

 

Precip thus far in 2018:   11.01 inches

 

Snowfall thus far in 2018:   38.7 inches

 

Last frost of early summer:  7/1

 

First frost of late summer:  8/29

 

Last snow of late spring:  5/1 

 

First snow of early fall:   10/6


#561
wx_statman

Posted 12 September 2018 - 09:07 PM

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The answer was South Carolina for anyone interested.

 

Ah. I actually checked Tennessee and Alabama, because of the September 1925 heat wave in that region. Didn't check South Carolina. 



#562
wx_statman

Posted 12 September 2018 - 09:09 PM

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Here's another question just for fun.   

 

Which locations have glaciers in places that seldom have snow fall?  I can think of a few.  They are outside the US though.  Some are obvious, while some are surprising.  The reasons are different for different locations. 

 

Franz Josef glacier in NZ immediately came to mind, thanks to its low-elevation reach in a maritime climate. 



#563
Scott

Posted 13 September 2018 - 07:04 AM

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Franz Josef glacier in NZ immediately came to mind, thanks to its low-elevation reach in a maritime climate. 

 

Yes, there.   The lowest parts of Fox and Franz Joseph Glaciers seldom have snowfall, even in winter, but the mountains above see a tremendous amount.   It's enough to push the glaciers almost down almost to sea level.

 

Here are the other places I was thinking of:
 

The Atacama Desert is the driest desert in the world (though parts of Antarctica may be just as dry), but a few glaciers do exist (at least for now).  Above 20,000 feet or so, it's cold enough that what (rare) snow does fall has formed glaciers over thousands of years.

 

Parts of northern Greenland see almost no snow (much of Greenland does see snow though), but it's too cold to melt what does fall, thus glaciers are formed.

 

Much of Antarctica is the same way.   Most of Antarctica sees very little snow (the exceptions are in places near the coast along the Antarctic Peninsula). Since the temperature never reaches freezing in most places in Antarctica, glaciers have formed over millions of years of accumulation. 

 

Another possible answer is parts of Mongolia, though summers are wet enough (all other seasons see almost no precipitation in much of the country) that it is a stretch to say that snow is seldom since summer does see snow on occasion in the areas where glaciers exist (the highest mountains of the Altai are actually wet by Mongolia standards-though still very dry [snow does fall in the Altai somewhat frequently], but some other areas in Mongolia with glaciers are much drier).


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At home:

 

Coldest temperature thus far in 2018:   -26 on 2/21

 

Warmest temperature thus far in 2018:  99 on 7/8 (All time record high)

 

Precip thus far in 2018:   11.01 inches

 

Snowfall thus far in 2018:   38.7 inches

 

Last frost of early summer:  7/1

 

First frost of late summer:  8/29

 

Last snow of late spring:  5/1 

 

First snow of early fall:   10/6


#564
wx_statman

Posted 19 September 2018 - 09:58 AM

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The answer was South Carolina for anyone interested.

 

By the way, SC broke their state record high in 2012. So the June/September quirk is no longer true in that state.  :P



#565
Scott

Posted 19 September 2018 - 05:27 PM

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Yes; I missed that one for some reason. That leaves Alabama as the last state with its record high in September.

At home:

 

Coldest temperature thus far in 2018:   -26 on 2/21

 

Warmest temperature thus far in 2018:  99 on 7/8 (All time record high)

 

Precip thus far in 2018:   11.01 inches

 

Snowfall thus far in 2018:   38.7 inches

 

Last frost of early summer:  7/1

 

First frost of late summer:  8/29

 

Last snow of late spring:  5/1 

 

First snow of early fall:   10/6


#566
wx_statman

Posted 31 October 2018 - 10:24 PM

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RE: Alaska state monthly records.

 

I found another interesting one. Beaver RAWS hit -48 in the October 1996 cold wave (lowest official reading was -41 in Tok). This reading tied the official October record for the state, -48 at Clear Water in 1975. 


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#567
Scott

Posted 14 November 2018 - 11:52 AM

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Another trivia question:

 

In which US state is does the permanent snowline generally increase in elevation as you move south to north.  


At home:

 

Coldest temperature thus far in 2018:   -26 on 2/21

 

Warmest temperature thus far in 2018:  99 on 7/8 (All time record high)

 

Precip thus far in 2018:   11.01 inches

 

Snowfall thus far in 2018:   38.7 inches

 

Last frost of early summer:  7/1

 

First frost of late summer:  8/29

 

Last snow of late spring:  5/1 

 

First snow of early fall:   10/6


#568
Phil

Posted 14 November 2018 - 12:25 PM

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Another trivia question:

In which US state is does the permanent snowline generally increase in elevation as you move south to north.


Is it outside the lower-48? ;)

If it’s not Alaska, then maybe Idaho or Wyoming?
Personal Weather Station, Live Stream on Wunderground: https://www.wundergr...pwsdash#history

#569
wx_statman

Posted 14 November 2018 - 08:43 PM

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Alaska makes the most sense, given the huge snowfall totals in the south vs. relatively dry north...


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#570
Scott

Posted 14 November 2018 - 09:26 PM

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Yes, it's Alaska. Southern Alaska (as far as I know all of it) has a lower perpetual snow line than the Brooks Range. Central Alaska has a snow line between the two.
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At home:

 

Coldest temperature thus far in 2018:   -26 on 2/21

 

Warmest temperature thus far in 2018:  99 on 7/8 (All time record high)

 

Precip thus far in 2018:   11.01 inches

 

Snowfall thus far in 2018:   38.7 inches

 

Last frost of early summer:  7/1

 

First frost of late summer:  8/29

 

Last snow of late spring:  5/1 

 

First snow of early fall:   10/6


#571
Scott

Posted 27 November 2018 - 11:15 AM

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Just for fun:

Which location is thought that wind speeds can exceed 1300 mph?

At home:

 

Coldest temperature thus far in 2018:   -26 on 2/21

 

Warmest temperature thus far in 2018:  99 on 7/8 (All time record high)

 

Precip thus far in 2018:   11.01 inches

 

Snowfall thus far in 2018:   38.7 inches

 

Last frost of early summer:  7/1

 

First frost of late summer:  8/29

 

Last snow of late spring:  5/1 

 

First snow of early fall:   10/6


#572
wx_statman

Posted 27 November 2018 - 05:26 PM

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Just for fun:

Which location is thought that wind speeds can exceed 1300 mph?

 

Is this a trick question? I.e. factoring in the rotation speed of the earth or something?


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#573
Phil

Posted 27 November 2018 - 05:31 PM

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Is this a trick question? I.e. factoring in the rotation speed of the earth or something?


Has to be somewhere above the mesopause.
Personal Weather Station, Live Stream on Wunderground: https://www.wundergr...pwsdash#history

#574
Scott

Posted 27 November 2018 - 05:52 PM

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Is this a trick question? I.e. factoring in the rotation speed of the earth or something?


It's sort of a trick question, but the wind speeds are real. They don't include rotation.

Has to be somewhere above the mesopause


Even in the mesopause, wind speeds don't approach that high.

At home:

 

Coldest temperature thus far in 2018:   -26 on 2/21

 

Warmest temperature thus far in 2018:  99 on 7/8 (All time record high)

 

Precip thus far in 2018:   11.01 inches

 

Snowfall thus far in 2018:   38.7 inches

 

Last frost of early summer:  7/1

 

First frost of late summer:  8/29

 

Last snow of late spring:  5/1 

 

First snow of early fall:   10/6


#575
GHweatherChris

Posted 27 November 2018 - 07:19 PM

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When an asteroid hits? Other than that, no where on earth.

#576
Scott

Posted 27 November 2018 - 07:55 PM

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When an asteroid hits? Other than that, no where on earth.


Nowhere on earth is the key. One of the planets in our solar system has winds that can exceed 1300 mph.

At home:

 

Coldest temperature thus far in 2018:   -26 on 2/21

 

Warmest temperature thus far in 2018:  99 on 7/8 (All time record high)

 

Precip thus far in 2018:   11.01 inches

 

Snowfall thus far in 2018:   38.7 inches

 

Last frost of early summer:  7/1

 

First frost of late summer:  8/29

 

Last snow of late spring:  5/1 

 

First snow of early fall:   10/6


#577
Phil

Posted 27 November 2018 - 08:46 PM

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Nowhere on earth is the key. One of the planets in our solar system has winds that can exceed 1300 mph.


Ahh, important little detail there.

Neptune.
Personal Weather Station, Live Stream on Wunderground: https://www.wundergr...pwsdash#history

#578
Scott

Posted 27 November 2018 - 08:59 PM

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Neptune


Correct. I wonder what the windchill would be with a -353F temperature and a 1300 mph wind? ;)

At home:

 

Coldest temperature thus far in 2018:   -26 on 2/21

 

Warmest temperature thus far in 2018:  99 on 7/8 (All time record high)

 

Precip thus far in 2018:   11.01 inches

 

Snowfall thus far in 2018:   38.7 inches

 

Last frost of early summer:  7/1

 

First frost of late summer:  8/29

 

Last snow of late spring:  5/1 

 

First snow of early fall:   10/6


#579
GHweatherChris

Posted 27 November 2018 - 11:04 PM

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You are welcome Phil!
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#580
wx_statman

Posted 28 November 2018 - 12:14 AM

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Nowhere on earth is the key. One of the planets in our solar system has winds that can exceed 1300 mph.

 

I knew it! Trick question after all.  :P



#581
Phil

Posted 28 November 2018 - 01:43 PM

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Correct. I wonder what the windchill would be with a -353F temperature and a 1300 mph wind? ;)


Whatever it is, I’m sure it’s worse in Tim’s backyard.
Personal Weather Station, Live Stream on Wunderground: https://www.wundergr...pwsdash#history

#582
Scott

Posted 03 December 2018 - 11:11 AM

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Hard:

 

Here are a few questions that might be hard, but they are interesting.

 

1.  Which towns or cities have recorded both the nation's (or at least in the Lower 48) high and low temperatures in the same year?

 

2.  Which town or city has recorded the nation's (Lower 48) low and high at least twice?

 

Easier:

 

3.  Which city has recorded temperatures of at least 40 or colder every month of the year?

 

A = Denver

B = Salt Lake City

C = Minneapolis

D = Chicago

 

4.  Which city has recorded subzero temperatures seven months of the year?  

 

A = Denver

B = International Falls

C = Caribou, Maine

D = Burlington, Vermont

 

5.  Which city has recorded temperatures over 90 degrees in April?

 

A = Salt Lake City

B = International Falls

C = Pocatello, Idaho

D = Elko, Nevada

 

6.  Which city has the warmest all time extreme low temperature?

 

A = Salt Lake City

B = Denver

C = Milwaukee 

D = Chicago


At home:

 

Coldest temperature thus far in 2018:   -26 on 2/21

 

Warmest temperature thus far in 2018:  99 on 7/8 (All time record high)

 

Precip thus far in 2018:   11.01 inches

 

Snowfall thus far in 2018:   38.7 inches

 

Last frost of early summer:  7/1

 

First frost of late summer:  8/29

 

Last snow of late spring:  5/1 

 

First snow of early fall:   10/6


#583
Phil

Posted 03 December 2018 - 02:33 PM

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1 & 2: Somewhere in the Dakotas or eastern Montana?

3) Denver

4) Denver

5) International Falls, I think?

6) Either Milwaukee or Chicago.
Personal Weather Station, Live Stream on Wunderground: https://www.wundergr...pwsdash#history

#584
Scott

Posted 03 December 2018 - 04:03 PM

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1 & 2: Somewhere in the Dakotas or eastern Montana?

 

 

For #1, one of the locations is in Eastern Montana.  In 1988, Glasgow had the nation's high on 6/5/1988 with 108 and the nation's low on 11/17/1988 with -7 and 12/24/1988 with -6.

 

The other location is Elk City Idaho, but looking closer, I think the high is dubious. For 8/26/1986, the nation's high is listed as 106 at Elk City and on 10/18/1986 Elk City had the nation's low with 14.  Looking closer, I don't think the 106 is valid though.   

 

I would assume that in 1936, it could have happened in the Dakotas as well, but I don't know where or even if the daily nation high and low information can be obtained that far back (without going through all of the weather records by hand!).

 

2006 in South Dakota would be a good candidate as well, though I can't find any.

 

Edit:  International Falls should almost certainly be on the list.   It had the nation's high on 6/17/1995.   It's a sure bet that it also had the nation's low sometime in 1995.

 

Two Harbors Minnesota also had the nation's high on 5/6/2016.   It's possible that it may have had the nation's low the same year, but I'd have to go through the records.  

 

For #2, the location isn't in the Dakotas or Eastern Montana.

 

3) Denver

 

 

Nope.   Denver (surprisingly perhaps) has never dropped to 40 or below in July.

 

4) Denver

 

 

Yes.   Denver has relatively mild winters, but they do sometimes have early and late season cold snaps.  Even International Falls hasn't dropped below zero in as many months as Denver.

 

5) International Falls, I think?

 

 

Yes.   International Falls has had three April days at or above 90.   On 4/21/1980 it was 90; on 4/27/1952 it was 93; and on 4/28/1952 it was 91. 

 

6) Either Milwaukee or Chicago. 

 

 

Yes.   I was thinking Milwaukee, but it could also be Chicago if you use the Midway Airport.

 

Here are the all time record lows for each location (at least at the airports):

 

Salt Lake City = -30 on 2/9/1933

Denver = -29 (some almanacs say -30, but don't give a date) on 1/9/1875

Milwaukee = -26 on 1/17/1982 and 2/3/1996

Chicago O'Hare = -27 on 1/20/1985

Chicago Midway = -25 on 1/20/1985 (some almanacs say -26, but don't give a date) 


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At home:

 

Coldest temperature thus far in 2018:   -26 on 2/21

 

Warmest temperature thus far in 2018:  99 on 7/8 (All time record high)

 

Precip thus far in 2018:   11.01 inches

 

Snowfall thus far in 2018:   38.7 inches

 

Last frost of early summer:  7/1

 

First frost of late summer:  8/29

 

Last snow of late spring:  5/1 

 

First snow of early fall:   10/6


#585
Phil

Posted 03 December 2018 - 04:55 PM

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I think it’s interesting how the majority of the big cold/snow records west of the Rockies occurred more than a half century ago, while many of the cold/snow records east of the Rockies were set after the 1970s.
Personal Weather Station, Live Stream on Wunderground: https://www.wundergr...pwsdash#history

#586
Scott

Posted 03 December 2018 - 06:03 PM

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I think it’s interesting how the majority of the big cold/snow records west of the Rockies occurred more than a half century ago, while many of the cold/snow records east of the Rockies were set after the 1970s.

 

Yes, especially the all time records in the bigger cities.  

 

From the Rockies and westward there really haven't been many all time records set since December 1990.

 

In the last 50 years, there were some big cold snaps that set several all time records (1/1971; 2/1985; 2/1989; 12/1990 come immediately to mind), but they seemed to have disappeared in the last few decades. 

 

A few impressive cold snaps in recent years have produced some impressive monthly records, but not all time records.   Some impressive cold snaps in the West since 1990 include 10/1991; 11/1991; 8/1992; 7/1993; 11/1993; 6/1995; 2/1996; 6/1998; 11/2000; 10/2002; 11/2004; 11/2006; 4/2008; 12/2009; 2/2011; 11/2014; and 1/2017, but none of those (to my knowledge at least) produced all time records.   

 

While places like Salt Lake City dropped to -30 in 1933 and to the -20's several times in the 1930's and 1940's, it is extremely unlikely (in my opinion at least) that Salt Lake City will see any temperatures reaching -20 in my lifetime.   

 

Chicago or Milwaukee haven't recorded temperatures of -30, but I fully suspect that they will drop to the -20's again in the future and within our lifetimes.   


At home:

 

Coldest temperature thus far in 2018:   -26 on 2/21

 

Warmest temperature thus far in 2018:  99 on 7/8 (All time record high)

 

Precip thus far in 2018:   11.01 inches

 

Snowfall thus far in 2018:   38.7 inches

 

Last frost of early summer:  7/1

 

First frost of late summer:  8/29

 

Last snow of late spring:  5/1 

 

First snow of early fall:   10/6


#587
Scott

Posted 04 December 2018 - 09:04 AM

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For those interested in the answers, Phil got most of them, but here are the answers to the ones still unanswered.

 

 

3.  Which city has recorded temperatures of at least 40 or colder every month of the year?

 

A = Denver

B = Salt Lake City

C = Minneapolis

D = Chicago

 

 

The answer is Salt Lake City.   Salt Lake City has dropped to 40 twice in July and August has dropped to 37 twice.

 

It is surprising that Denver hasn't gotten as cold as Salt Lake City in July and August, since summer nights average colder there, but perhaps the higher humidity (in comparison to Salt Lake in summer) has prevented it from happening. 

 

Minneapolis and Chicago are very close to dropping to 40 in every month, but the record low for August in Chicago is 41 and the record low for July in Minneapolis is 43.   For these locations, for sure it is the humidity that has prevented colder temperatures in the summer.

 

2.  Which town or city has recorded the nation's (Lower 48) low and high at least twice?

 

 

 

 It is Valentine, Nebraska.   When it comes to averages, there are colder and hotter places on average, but the temperatures in Valentine fluctuate all over the place from one day to the next.   It is enough that Valentine has recorded the nation's high and low on at least two occasions, and possibly more.  


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At home:

 

Coldest temperature thus far in 2018:   -26 on 2/21

 

Warmest temperature thus far in 2018:  99 on 7/8 (All time record high)

 

Precip thus far in 2018:   11.01 inches

 

Snowfall thus far in 2018:   38.7 inches

 

Last frost of early summer:  7/1

 

First frost of late summer:  8/29

 

Last snow of late spring:  5/1 

 

First snow of early fall:   10/6


#588
Phil

Posted 04 December 2018 - 09:29 AM

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Fascinating stuff, man. I really appreciate it.
Personal Weather Station, Live Stream on Wunderground: https://www.wundergr...pwsdash#history

#589
Scott

Posted 04 December 2018 - 10:27 AM

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Fascinating stuff, man. I really appreciate it.

 

Here's a question that you may know the answer to.  I do not.

 

A weather almanac I have lists West Virginia as the state east of the Mississippi that has recorded the nation's high and low in the course of a single year, but it doesn't give the locations.

 

I have seen West Virginia record the nation's low, but not the high. 

Which place or places in West Virginia have recorded the nation's high?  


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At home:

 

Coldest temperature thus far in 2018:   -26 on 2/21

 

Warmest temperature thus far in 2018:  99 on 7/8 (All time record high)

 

Precip thus far in 2018:   11.01 inches

 

Snowfall thus far in 2018:   38.7 inches

 

Last frost of early summer:  7/1

 

First frost of late summer:  8/29

 

Last snow of late spring:  5/1 

 

First snow of early fall:   10/6


#590
Scott

Posted 06 December 2018 - 07:58 PM

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OK; one more Solar System question.

 

Which (there is more than one) of the following planets is known to have permanent ice:

 

A.  Mercury

B.  Venus

C.  Earth

D.  Mars


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At home:

 

Coldest temperature thus far in 2018:   -26 on 2/21

 

Warmest temperature thus far in 2018:  99 on 7/8 (All time record high)

 

Precip thus far in 2018:   11.01 inches

 

Snowfall thus far in 2018:   38.7 inches

 

Last frost of early summer:  7/1

 

First frost of late summer:  8/29

 

Last snow of late spring:  5/1 

 

First snow of early fall:   10/6


#591
Phil

Posted 06 December 2018 - 08:52 PM

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Mars and Earth do. I don’t know about the others.
Personal Weather Station, Live Stream on Wunderground: https://www.wundergr...pwsdash#history

#592
Phil

Posted 06 December 2018 - 08:59 PM

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Here's a question that you may know the answer to. I do not.

A weather almanac I have lists West Virginia as the state east of the Mississippi that has recorded the nation's high and low in the course of a single year, but it doesn't give the locations.

I have seen West Virginia record the nation's low, but not the high.

Which place or places in West Virginia have recorded the nation's high?


I actually don’t know the answer to this..and I find it hard to believe, tbh. I could see West Virginia featuring the largest temperature *spread* of any state east of the Mississippi given the extremely variable topography and the extreme adiabatic/upslope microclimate cooling effects during the winter.

Places like Snowshoe can easily drop below -20*F and have supposedly dropped to -45*F, while downslope locations like Martinsburg, WV can get extremely hot during the summer (they hit 110*F during the dust bowl of the 1930s).
Personal Weather Station, Live Stream on Wunderground: https://www.wundergr...pwsdash#history

#593
Scott

Posted 06 December 2018 - 09:37 PM

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Mars and Earth do. I don’t know about the others.


The other planet is (surprisingly) Mercury. Temperatures on Mercury average 335F and can reach 800F. Since Mercury has almost no atmosphere, night temperatures drop to -290F. Ice deep in craters and fissures survives near the poles in areas that are permanently shaded. Not bad for a planet that hits 800F in the sun! It's definitely an example of extreme microclimates. The temperature can change by a thousand degrees by simply seeking a nearby shaded area.
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At home:

 

Coldest temperature thus far in 2018:   -26 on 2/21

 

Warmest temperature thus far in 2018:  99 on 7/8 (All time record high)

 

Precip thus far in 2018:   11.01 inches

 

Snowfall thus far in 2018:   38.7 inches

 

Last frost of early summer:  7/1

 

First frost of late summer:  8/29

 

Last snow of late spring:  5/1 

 

First snow of early fall:   10/6


#594
Scott

Posted 06 December 2018 - 10:07 PM

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Places like Snowshoe can easily drop below -20*F

I remember the nation's daily low being in Canaan Valley before, but unfortunately that station isn't operating anymore. Next to Snowshoe, Canaan Valley seems to be one of the coldest locations in West Virginia, at least at night.

As far as the nation's daily high goes, if in West Virgina it probably wouldn't be in summer. I have seen Maryland have the nation's high before, so I guess it could happen in West Virgina during a freak heat wave, most likely in Spring or Fall. West Virgina did have a freak heat wave in December 1982 (with several locations in the 80's), but it probably want enough to beat Florida on any day because Florida was warm then too. Maybe it could have beat out Florida on one of the days though? I don't know and it would take a lot of digging.
  • Phil likes this

At home:

 

Coldest temperature thus far in 2018:   -26 on 2/21

 

Warmest temperature thus far in 2018:  99 on 7/8 (All time record high)

 

Precip thus far in 2018:   11.01 inches

 

Snowfall thus far in 2018:   38.7 inches

 

Last frost of early summer:  7/1

 

First frost of late summer:  8/29

 

Last snow of late spring:  5/1 

 

First snow of early fall:   10/6


#595
Phil

Posted 07 December 2018 - 06:03 AM

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The other planet is (surprisingly) Mercury. Temperatures on Mercury average 335F and can reach 800F. Since Mercury has almost no atmosphere, night temperatures drop to -290F. Ice deep in craters and fissures survives near the poles in areas that are permanently shaded. Not bad for a planet that hits 800F in the sun! It's definitely an example of extreme microclimates. The temperature can change by a thousand degrees by simply seeking a nearby shaded area.


Wow, I didn’t know that. That’s actually fascinating.

Are you into astronomy? You seem pretty loaded with knowledge about this stuff.
Personal Weather Station, Live Stream on Wunderground: https://www.wundergr...pwsdash#history

#596
Phil

Posted 07 December 2018 - 06:39 AM

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I remember the nation's daily low being in Canaan Valley before, but unfortunately that station isn't operating anymore. Next to Snowshoe, Canaan Valley seems to be one of the coldest locations in West Virginia, at least at night.

As far as the nation's daily high goes, if in West Virgina it probably wouldn't be in summer. I have seen Maryland have the nation's high before, so I guess it could happen in West Virgina during a freak heat wave, most likely in Spring or Fall. West Virgina did have a freak heat wave in December 1982 (with several locations in the 80's), but it probably want enough to beat Florida on any day because Florida was warm then too. Maybe it could have beat out Florida on one of the days though? I don't know and it would take a lot of digging.


I didn’t know that either, re: Canaan. It’s definitely less windy than Snowshoe, so perhaps they radiate better at night. The thing is, the coldest places in West Virginia are generally windy ridgetop communities that never decouple from streamflow, so they have almost no diurnal cycle whatsoever.

If there was a “coldest *high* temperature” contest, Snowshoe would win in a landslide, since cold advection produces upslope flow that smothers the mountain in thick freezing fog or ice crystal fog, so there’s almost no insolation to warm the surface. On January 4th last year, the high temperature at Snowshoe was -27*F, but the low wasn’t much different..only -29*F. So only a 2 degree spread there (oh, and the wind was gusting over 70mph on the summit that day...bet that felt icy 😶).

BTW, while it’s not an “official” station, there is a weather station up at Snowshoe, in a wind-protected location. They installed it last February near the Ballhooter lift. Since it’s sheltered from the powerful west winds, there’s less issue with damages to the station from rime ice accretion in the winds.

https://www.wundergr...SNOWS15#history

As for the heat, it’d have to occur during the Spring. The Gulf is too warm during the autumn and winter to compete with the southeastern states, and the summer pattern is too slow/stagnant to advect enough heat into WV to beat places farther to the southwest. So it would have to be an early/mid Spring heatwave, when the wavetrain is still energetic, and the Gulf/Atlantic waters are still chilly.
Personal Weather Station, Live Stream on Wunderground: https://www.wundergr...pwsdash#history

#597
Scott

Posted 07 December 2018 - 09:20 AM

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Are you into astronomy? You seem pretty loaded with knowledge about this stuff. 

 

 

Somewhat.  It is interesting.


At home:

 

Coldest temperature thus far in 2018:   -26 on 2/21

 

Warmest temperature thus far in 2018:  99 on 7/8 (All time record high)

 

Precip thus far in 2018:   11.01 inches

 

Snowfall thus far in 2018:   38.7 inches

 

Last frost of early summer:  7/1

 

First frost of late summer:  8/29

 

Last snow of late spring:  5/1 

 

First snow of early fall:   10/6