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Unusual weather trivia that is hard to google

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#51
wx_statman

Posted 16 September 2016 - 04:07 PM

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Now that I look at it though, even the Attu readings do look a bit strange in the link you provided.   It says that the current temperature at the time of the reading was 29F and there are a several other days with diurnal changes close to or exceeding 30F (March 9, 12, 15, 17, 18, and 21).  I wouldn't think that could happen often (or at all) in the Aleutians, but maybe it really is the case?   

 

 

 

I would chalk that up to snowcover/decoupling on clear nights. Also, I'm willing to bet that Bering sea ice was at seasonal maximum around that time which helped create the more continental temperature profile that you see. 

 

Regarding observation times, they appear to be in the afternoon @ this location so they wouldn't have any relation to overnight lows. 



#52
wx_statman

Posted 16 September 2016 - 04:26 PM

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PS, since Hawaii was mentioned, do you know what the lowest legitimate temperature in Hawaii is?   I believe Chris Burt checked into the 12F May 17 1979 reading and found it to be inaccurate (it was supposed to be 21F).

 

WRCC has another 12F on February 25 1977, but I don't know if that one is legitimate or not.   If possible, I'd like to correct any erroneous values on the webpage below:

http://www.summitpos...-summits/171585

The Hawaii Atlas actually has a 9F low for January, but doesn't give a source or date, so it seems very suspect.  
 

 

Yeah Christopher Burt researched state temperature records a few years ago. He had a very interesting two-part blog post on the subject:

 

https://www.wundergr...tml?entrynum=18

 

https://www.wundergr...tml?entrynum=19

 

Unfortunately I can't add any more to what he laid out:

 

The coldest temperatures on record for Hawaii are, of course, reported from the several mountaintop observatories in the state. Mauna Kea Observatory located near the summit of said mountain at 13,796’ has had a potted history of weather observations. I say potted because for some reason the COOP forms from this site have been stamped as “unreliable” for several years (1976-1978) of observations during the 1970s. This includes the month of January 1976 when a 9°F reading was made on January 12th of that month and a 12°F reading on Feb. 22, 1977. The ‘official’ low of 12°F on May 17th, 1979 is obviously an error when one looks at the COOP form for that month:

 

One can see the observer has circled the 12°F reading and replaced it with a 21°F note and question mark (see above). Furthermore, the low temperatures on both the day before and after May 17th were just 23°F lending further doubt to the 12°F reading.

 

So what might be the actual lowest temperature for Hawaii? A 14°F reading from the summit station at Haleakala, Maui (elevation 10,023’) on Jan. 2, 1961 is the 2nd coldest reading from the state. This, however, is also unbelievable since the low temperature from the previous and following days was just 34°. Twenty-degree swings in minimum temperatures from one day to the next are highly improbable in tropical environments like Hawaii. This leaves a 15°F reading from Mauna Kea Observatory on Jan. 5, 1975 as the mostly likely reliably measured temperature in the state on record.


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#53
Scott

Posted 16 September 2016 - 08:04 PM

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It looks like Attu is the winner. There are a couple other interesting examples. The second coldest reading on record @ Dutch Harbor was -5F on 4/1/1997. Only colder reading was -8F on 1/22/1986. Appears legit based on the original COOP observation form:

 

http://www1.ncdc.noa...F5D0EC8220A.pdf

 

Wales, AK - on the tip of the Seward Peninsula to the west of Nome - recorded -42F on 3/26/77 which is only 2F from their all-time record low. 

 

There might be one possible later one at Cape Hinchinbrook.  WRCC says a record low of -15F on March 26 1963, but it looks dubious?  



#54
wx_statman

Posted 16 September 2016 - 11:46 PM

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There might be one possible later one at Cape Hinchinbrook.  WRCC says a record low of -15F on March 26 1963, but it looks dubious?  

 

Interesting. It shows up in the COOP form but it looks dubious there as well:

 

http://www1.ncdc.noa...F59C13ED53A.pdf

 

The nearest station "Cordova North" was 24 degrees that morning:

 

http://www1.ncdc.noa...7BE95CD3C53.pdf

 

I'm trying to wrap my mind around this one. The observer hand-wrote -15F on the form. Did he make it up? Was he drunk? Did the thermo read -15F erroneously for whatever reason? I honestly don't know what to think here. And this begs the question of how accurate the other hand-written observations that we discussed actually are, i.e. the -5F at Attu on 3/21/1985 or the -5F at Dutch Harbor on 4/1/1997. Although I still tend to believe the latter two, since they fall within the realm of possibility. 



#55
Scott

Posted 17 September 2016 - 07:20 AM

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Although I still tend to believe the latter two, since they fall within the realm of possibility. 

 

 

 
Yes, I don't think the Cape Hinchinbrook is reading is accurate.   Alaska does seem to have quite a few dubious readings at some of the weather stations (more so than other areas in the US).   It can be said for sure though, many stations along the Bering Sea, the western section of the Arctic Ocean, the Aleutian Islands and the Gulf of Alaska have their record lows in March. 


#56
IbrChris

Posted 19 September 2016 - 06:22 PM

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I have thought of those readings as well, but I believe the August one at least to be legitimate (see below discussion).  

 

Yes I am very aware of the late Aug 1910 cold snap...I just wasn't sure of the location. Bowen Camp/Lake seems like the best bet for the location, especially if it is near other very cold spots in SW Montana. Often the station name was shortened in the records. I think I will stick the Hebgen Lake value in there since there's an exact date for it.


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#57
IbrChris

Posted 19 September 2016 - 06:23 PM

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Interesting. It shows up in the COOP form but it looks dubious there as well:

 

http://www1.ncdc.noa...F59C13ED53A.pdf

 

The nearest station "Cordova North" was 24 degrees that morning:

 

http://www1.ncdc.noa...7BE95CD3C53.pdf

 

I'm trying to wrap my mind around this one. The observer hand-wrote -15F on the form. Did he make it up? Was he drunk? Did the thermo read -15F erroneously for whatever reason? I honestly don't know what to think here. And this begs the question of how accurate the other hand-written observations that we discussed actually are, i.e. the -5F at Attu on 3/21/1985 or the -5F at Dutch Harbor on 4/1/1997. Although I still tend to believe the latter two, since they fall within the realm of possibility. 

Cape Hinchinbrook is near Prince William Sound in south-central AK, at sea level. I'm going to say no way it was -15 there in mid-late March.


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#58
wx_statman

Posted 19 September 2016 - 10:31 PM

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Cape Hinchinbrook is near Prince William Sound in south-central AK, at sea level. I'm going to say no way it was -15 there in mid-late March.

 

I agree. I don't buy that reading either. I will say though, its really unusual seeing a clearly visible (not smudged or corrected), relatively modern (not late 19th century/early 20th century) hand-written observation on a COOP form appear to be so far out of wack. This might be the worst example I've seen yet. I wonder what the story was that day, and what motivated that observer to write down -15. 



#59
wx_statman

Posted 20 September 2016 - 11:08 PM

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For Montana I have the following monthly record lows in my database:

Jan: -70 Rogers Pass on 20/1954
Feb: -66 Riverside RS (near W Yellowstone) on 9/1933 (erroneously placed as WY state record but station was located on MT side of border)
Mar: -45 Fort Logan on 15/1906
Apr: -30 Summit on 2/1935
May: -5 Polebridge on 1/1954
Jun: 11 Kings Hill on 6/1943
Jul: 15 Bowen in 1919 (would like a better source for these readings...may be apocryphal).
Aug: 5 Bowen in 1910
Sept: -9 Riverside RS on 24/1926
Oct: -30 Summit on 31/1935 (major late Oct cold blast in PNW)
Nov: -53 Lincoln in 1919
Dec: -59 Riverside RS in 1924

 

Also, it should be noted that Gates Park RAWS recorded -33 on 4/2/2002. 

 

This was an excellent cold spot that unfortunately only had a full-time operating sensor between October 2001 and October 2007, and part time data (mostly during the warm season) since then.

 

http://www.raws.dri....wMAIN.pl?mtMGAT

 

Other notable readings @ this site:

 

-41 on 3/8/2002

-50 on 2/24/2003 

-46 on 1/14/2005

-54 on 2/17/2006


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#60
Scott

Posted 21 September 2016 - 11:55 AM

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Also, it should be noted that Gates Park RAWS recorded -33 on 4/2/2002. 

 

This was an excellent cold spot that unfortunately only had a full-time operating sensor between October 2001 and October 2007, and part time data (mostly during the warm season) since then.

 

http://www.raws.dri....wMAIN.pl?mtMGAT

 

Other notable readings @ this site:

 

-41 on 3/8/2002

-50 on 2/24/2003 

-46 on 1/14/2005

-54 on 2/17/2006

 

Since we're on April, I wonder what the coldest reliable April temperature is for the Lower 48 (besides Peter Sinks of course)?

 

Some sites say Eagle Nest (New Mexico), with a reading of -36F.   This is apparently an unreliable reading as the WRCC has the revised reading at no lower than -21F.

 

Bergland (Michigan) supposedly had a -34F during an April cold snap in 1923.   Breckenridge (Colorado) has a very old April reading of -35F in 1891, but if it is accurate, I assume that it was probably recorded at one of the high mountain mines around Breckenridge, of which many exist.   White Mountain 2 (California), and Fraser (Colorado) both have reliable readings of -30F in April, and of course there is the one for Summit (Montana).

 

There aren't that many -30F or lower readings in the lower 48 for April. 



#61
wx_statman

Posted 21 September 2016 - 11:48 PM

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Since we're on April, I wonder what the coldest reliable April temperature is for the Lower 48 (besides Peter Sinks of course)?

 

Some sites say Eagle Nest (New Mexico), with a reading of -36F.   This is apparently an unreliable reading as the WRCC has the revised reading at no lower than -21F.

 

Bergland (Michigan) supposedly had a -34F during an April cold snap in 1923.   Breckenridge (Colorado) has a very old April reading of -35F in 1891, but if it is accurate, I assume that it was probably recorded at one of the high mountain mines around Breckenridge, of which many exist.   White Mountain 2 (California), and Fraser (Colorado) both have reliable readings of -30F in April, and of course there is the one for Summit (Montana).

 

There aren't that many -30F or lower readings in the lower 48 for April. 

 

I'm inclined to believe the Eagle Nest reading, although I'm not 100% sure of its accuracy with regards to equipment calibration and placement. It appears very clearly in the original COOP form that month, both under April 5th and as the monthly low circled off to the right:

 

http://www1.ncdc.noa...28FF2388E3D.pdf

 

Its somewhat corroborated by readings of -29F in Taylor Park, CO and -28F in Moran, WY during that same cold wave. Both are monthly records with the latter reading within 1F of the WY state record for April. But its not very well corroborated by other readings in northern NM. The nearest station to Eagle Nest is Elizabethtown, which recorded -15F that morning (4/5/1945). That station only existed from 1904-1948 and has a very spotty period of record. A cursory comparison of the two stations reveals a 5F gap in the cold wave of January 27-28, 1948. Eagle Nest bottomed out at -43F during that event while Elizabethtown fell to -38F. Both locations are at over 8,000 feet and within 5 miles of each other. So just going by that example one can see how a 21F gap on 4/5/1945 is questionable, though not impossible. Other typical cold spots in northern NM were even warmer that morning. Chama fell to -10F on the 4th but only fell to 8F on the morning of the 5th, when Eagle Nest was supposedly -36F. Gavilan (the state record holder @ -50F on 2/1/1951) only fell to 6F on the 4th and 8F on the 5th. Though it should be noted that both Chama and Gavilan are quite a bit further west from Eagle Nest/Elizabethtown, where the morning of the 5th was apparently much colder judging by readings at both stations. I would say the closest we have to corroborating evidence for the Eagle Nest reading is the Taylor Park reading that morning (-29F), which proves that readings in the -30F range were possible in that general region on 4/5/1945. A high altitude, cold sink environment can produce significantly colder readings than other locations just a few miles away, and that may be what happened on the morning of 4/5/1945 at Eagle Nest.

 

Regarding Bergland, MI - I've looked at that reading before. I think its legit. That was a historic cold wave for early April. Bergland also hit -29F on 3/27/1913, another historic late season cold wave. Nearby Kenton hit -31F on 3/24/1965, another top tier cold airmass for that time of year. So -34F on 4/1/1923 is not out of the realm of possibility, IMO. 

 

You can see the -34F on the 1st listed as the monthly low on the right side:

 

http://www1.ncdc.noa...91E23BF3D48.pdf



#62
IbrChris

Posted 22 September 2016 - 12:59 AM

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Since we're on April, I wonder what the coldest reliable April temperature is for the Lower 48 (besides Peter Sinks of course)?

 

Some sites say Eagle Nest (New Mexico), with a reading of -36F.   This is apparently an unreliable reading as the WRCC has the revised reading at no lower than -21F.

 

Bergland (Michigan) supposedly had a -34F during an April cold snap in 1923.   Breckenridge (Colorado) has a very old April reading of -35F in 1891, but if it is accurate, I assume that it was probably recorded at one of the high mountain mines around Breckenridge, of which many exist.   White Mountain 2 (California), and Fraser (Colorado) both have reliable readings of -30F in April, and of course there is the one for Summit (Montana).

 

There aren't that many -30F or lower readings in the lower 48 for April. 

Probably the -41 recorded at Peter Sink, Utah on 4/1/2008. The -34 at Bergland is hard to believe due to the fact that the provincial April record lows for Manitoba and Ontario are -35, Minnesota -22 and Wisconsin -17. It's possible this was an ideal situation and the temperature was measured in some sort of frost hollow.


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#63
IbrChris

Posted 22 September 2016 - 01:14 AM

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Also, it should be noted that Gates Park RAWS recorded -33 on 4/2/2002. 

 

This was an excellent cold spot that unfortunately only had a full-time operating sensor between October 2001 and October 2007, and part time data (mostly during the warm season) since then.

 

http://www.raws.dri....wMAIN.pl?mtMGAT

 

Other notable readings @ this site:

 

-41 on 3/8/2002

-50 on 2/24/2003 

-46 on 1/14/2005

-54 on 2/17/2006

Gates Park topographically is a great spot for cold air pooling with the downstream outlet being constricted by multiple ridges. Gibson Dam is known as a cold spot as well. The -54 on 2/17/2006 beats anything recorded at famous cold spot Peter Sinks, UT in the 2010-2016 period (coldest -51).

I don't have any issue with RAWS low temps...so IMO Gates Park is the MT April record.


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#64
wx_statman

Posted 22 September 2016 - 10:03 AM

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Gates Park topographically is a great spot for cold air pooling with the downstream outlet being constricted by multiple ridges. Gibson Dam is known as a cold spot as well. The -54 on 2/17/2006 beats anything recorded at famous cold spot Peter Sinks, UT in the 2010-2016 period (coldest -51).

I don't have any issue with RAWS low temps...so IMO Gates Park is the MT April record.

 

I don't either. I would like RAWS readings to be eligible for official record purposes...maybe it will happen someday. 



#65
Scott

Posted 22 September 2016 - 05:20 PM

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The -34 at Bergland is hard to believe due to the fact that the provincial April record lows for Manitoba and Ontario are -35, Minnesota -22 and Wisconsin -17. It's possible this was an ideal situation and the temperature was measured in some sort of frost hollow.

 

 

 
Regarding Bergland, MI - I've looked at that reading before. I think its legit. That was a historic cold wave for early April. Bergland also hit -29F on 3/27/1913, another historic late season cold wave. Nearby Kenton hit -31F on 3/24/1965, another top tier cold airmass for that time of year. So -34F on 4/1/1923 is not out of the realm of possibility, IMO

 

 

I think it might be legit, even though very impressive for April.  By way of comparison, the record low in Michigan for November is -23F.

The April 1923 cold snap was probably the most severe April cold from Michigan to upstate New York.  

 

North Lake in upstate New York recorded a -24.   Below zero temperatures were reported at least as far south as West Virginia.   Wisconsin and New York recorded temps in the -20's.  
 

I'm inclined to believe the Eagle Nest reading, although I'm not 100% sure of its accuracy with regards to equipment calibration and placement. 

 

 

WRCC revised the record to -21F for some reason.  I don't know why.



#66
Scott

Posted 22 September 2016 - 05:22 PM

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Gates Park topographically is a great spot for cold air pooling with the downstream outlet being constricted by multiple ridges. Gibson Dam is known as a cold spot as well. The -54 on 2/17/2006 beats anything recorded at famous cold spot Peter Sinks, UT in the 2010-2016 period (coldest -51).

 

 

 

If you are interested, Antero Reservoir in Colorado also recorded a -51F last December:

http://www.upi.com/T.../6451450804077/
 


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#67
Scott

Posted 22 September 2016 - 05:41 PM

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On the other side of the calendar, the earliest record low I know of in the US outside of Hawaii is Antelope Island, Utah with November 16, 1955, but alas, there is only 20 years of data available so it might not count.

 

 

 

As a follow up, for stations that have many decades of data, a few New Mexico stations have their record lows in November.

 

Socorro:  -13F on November 29 1976
Ocate: -31F on November 27 1976

The same cold snap produced a 1F in El Paso Texas!  



#68
Scott

Posted 22 September 2016 - 05:52 PM

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Now for another trivia question:

 

Which location in North America has the biggest spread between the record low and record high temperature?  



#69
BLI snowman

Posted 22 September 2016 - 06:34 PM

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Now for another trivia question:

 

Which location in North America has the biggest spread between the record low and record high temperature?  

 

 

This area has to be close

 

http://www.wrcc.dri....iMAIN.pl?nd6867

 

112 and -60 for a 172 degree spread. Of course both of those extremes were in the same year (1936).



#70
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Posted 22 September 2016 - 07:14 PM

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This area has to be close

 

http://www.wrcc.dri....iMAIN.pl?nd6867

 

112 and -60 for a 172 degree spread. Of course both of those extremes were in the same year (1936).

 

Very impressive spread, but there are some places with even a greater spread, though not by much.



#71
wx_statman

Posted 22 September 2016 - 07:21 PM

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Very impressive spread, but there are some places with even a greater spread.

 

The biggest one I'm aware of is Fort Vermillion, Alberta at 181F. High of 103F and low of -78F.

 

Iroquois Falls, Ontario at 179F. High of 106F and low of -73F. 

 

Fort Yukon, AK at 178F. High of 100F and low of -78F. 

 

Medicine Lake, MT at 176F. High of 117F and low of -59F. 

 

Is the answer Fort Vermillion?



#72
wx_statman

Posted 22 September 2016 - 07:23 PM

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I think it might be legit, even though very impressive for April.  By way of comparison, the record low in Michigan for November is -23F.

The April 1923 cold snap was probably the most severe April cold from Michigan to upstate New York.  

 

North Lake in upstate New York recorded a -24.   Below zero temperatures were reported at least as far south as West Virginia.   Wisconsin and New York recorded temps in the -20's.  
 

 

WRCC revised the record to -21F for some reason.  I don't know why.

 

 

That's just the reading on the 4th. They're missing the reading on the 5th, which was when the -36F supposedly occurred. 



#73
wx_statman

Posted 22 September 2016 - 07:32 PM

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As a follow up, for stations that have many decades of data, a few New Mexico stations have their record lows in November.

 

Socorro:  -13F on November 29 1976
Ocate: -31F on November 27 1976

The same cold snap produced a 1F in El Paso Texas!  

 

That was a hell of a cold wave in the Rockies. Produced monthly state record lows in WY (-46F at Darwin Ranch), NM (-38F at Eagle Nest), OK (-15F at Kenton), and TX (-10F at Stratford). 

 

Another good example of a November cold wave producing top-tier cold is 1950 in the SE:

 

-1F at Nashville, TN

1F at Huntsville, AL

5F at Birmingham, AL

 

All three readings occurred on 11/25/1950. None of those locations have seen sub-10F cold that early in the season in any other year. 



#74
IbrChris

Posted 22 September 2016 - 07:56 PM

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This is what I have for April record lows across northern tier states (as well as southern Canada)...corrections welcome.

Washington: -7 Lake Keechelus 4/1/1936
Oregon: -23 Meacham 4/1/1936
Idaho: -22 Copper Basin 4/5/1997
Montana: -33 Gates Park 4/2/2002
Wyoming: -29 Lake Yellowstone 4/1/1920
North Dakota: -24 Powers Lake 4/2/1975
South Dakota: -16 Deerfield 4/3/1951
Minnesota: -22 Karlstad 4/6/1979
Wisconsin: -17 Rest Lake 4/1/1923
Michigan: -17 Champion Van Riper Park 4/4/1954 (official), Bergland -34 4/1/1923 (unofficial)
New York: -24 North Lake 4/1/1923
Vermont: -13 Mt Mansfield 4/7/1982
New Hampshire: -20 Mt Washington 4/5/1995
Maine: -14 Clayton Lake 4/2/1964

BC: -31 Smith River 4/1/1954
Alberta: -38 Peace River 4/2/1954
Saskatchewan: -40 Key Lake 4/1/1996
Manitoba: -35 Port Nelson 4/14/1923
Ontario: -35 Hornepayne 4/2/1932
Quebec: -35 Doucet 4/1/1923
 


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#75
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Posted 22 September 2016 - 07:57 PM

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I think it might be legit, even though very impressive for April.  By way of comparison, the record low in Michigan for November is -23F.

The April 1923 cold snap was probably the most severe April cold from Michigan to upstate New York.  

 

North Lake in upstate New York recorded a -24.   Below zero temperatures were reported at least as far south as West Virginia.   Wisconsin and New York recorded temps in the -20's.  
 

 

WRCC revised the record to -21F for some reason.  I don't know why.

 

Where was the Wisconsin value recorded?


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#76
Scott

Posted 22 September 2016 - 08:26 PM

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The biggest one I'm aware of is Fort Vermillion, Alberta at 181F. High of 103F and low of -78F.

 

Iroquois Falls, Ontario at 179F. High of 106F and low of -73F. 

 

Fort Yukon, AK at 178F. High of 100F and low of -78F. 

 

Medicine Lake, MT at 176F. High of 117F and low of -59F. 

 

Is the answer Fort Vermillion?

 

I was thinking it was a tie between Fort Vermilion and Iroquois Falls, but I was unaware of the 103F in Fort Vermilion (I have only seen records up to 101F).  When was the 103F recorded?

 

Some other large ranges:

Fort Good Hope:   -79F to 95F

Fort Smith:  -71F to 103

Parshall, ND:  -60F to 112F

Steele, ND:  -46F to 121F (probably the most impressive record high of any location I can think of and it appears legitimate)

Mc Intosh, SD:  -58F to 112F

 

I live just east of Maybell Colorado.   The range isn't quite as large here, but is still fairly impressive with -61F to 102F.  

Many places in Alaska have huge ranges.   Just a few are below.

Allakaket:  -75F to 94F

Aniak:  -72F to 87F

Bettles:  -70F to 93F

Chandlar Lake:  -74F to 90F

Chicken:  -72F to 91F

Circle:  -67F to 94F

Coldfoot:  -74F to 88F (impressive since the weather station was only operable for 7 years)

College:  -66F to 94F

Eagle:  -71F to 95F

Fairbanks:  -66F to 99F (if the 99F is accurate?)

Galena:  -70F to 92F

Hughes:  -68F to 90F

Kobuk:  -68F to 92F

Minchumina:  -66F to 92F

North Pole:  -67F to 95F

Northway:  -72F to 91F

Prospect Creek:  -80F to 87F (impressive since only 9 years of data is available)

Tanana:  -76F to 94F

Tok:  -71F to 96F

 

Outside of the Western US and Northern Plains, I always thought Warsaw Missouri, with -40F to 118F has a pretty impressive spread.



#77
Scott

Posted 22 September 2016 - 08:29 PM

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Where was the Wisconsin value recorded?

 

Rest Lake supposedly recorded a -20F April in 1923.



#78
Scott

Posted 22 September 2016 - 08:36 PM

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This is what I have for April record lows across northern tier states (as well as southern Canada)...corrections welcome.

Washington: -7 Lake Keechelus 4/1/1936
Oregon: -23 Meacham 4/1/1936
Idaho: -22 Copper Basin 4/5/1997
Montana: -33 Gates Park 4/2/2002
Wyoming: -29 Lake Yellowstone 4/1/1920
North Dakota: -24 Powers Lake 4/2/1975
South Dakota: -16 Deerfield 4/3/1951
Minnesota: -22 Karlstad 4/6/1979
Wisconsin: -17 Rest Lake 4/1/1923
Michigan: -17 Champion Van Riper Park 4/4/1954 (official), Bergland -34 4/1/1923 (unofficial)
New York: -24 North Lake 4/1/1923
Vermont: -13 Mt Mansfield 4/7/1982
New Hampshire: -20 Mt Washington 4/5/1995
Maine: -14 Clayton Lake 4/2/1964

BC: -31 Smith River 4/1/1954
Alberta: -38 Peace River 4/2/1954
Saskatchewan: -40 Key Lake 4/1/1996
Manitoba: -35 Port Nelson 4/14/1923
Ontario: -35 Hornepayne 4/2/1932
Quebec: -35 Doucet 4/1/1923
 

 

Other states in the lower 48:

 

Colorado:  -35F at Breckenridge 1891 (other places in Colorado have recorded -30F) 

California:  -30F at White Mountain 2 1970 (though this one might be questionable?)

The Weather Almanac says -17F for Deerfield, SD

Tower, MN also recorded a -22F in 1982



#79
Scott

Posted 22 September 2016 - 08:40 PM

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That was a hell of a cold wave in the Rockies. Produced monthly state record lows in WY (-46F at Darwin Ranch), NM (-38F at Eagle Nest), OK (-15F at Kenton), and TX (-10F at Stratford). 

 

Another good example of a November cold wave producing top-tier cold is 1950 in the SE:

 

-1F at Nashville, TN

1F at Huntsville, AL

5F at Birmingham, AL

 

All three readings occurred on 11/25/1950. None of those locations have seen sub-10F cold that early in the season in any other year. 

 

Another impressive one was mid November 1955 for the Pacific Northwest and the west side of the Rockies.  Even Salt Lake City dropped down to -14F.   Seattle dropped to 6F and Olympia -1F.  No other November cold snap even comes close.   It was especially impressive since it happened on November 15-16 rather than late in the month.  



#80
Scott

Posted 22 September 2016 - 08:50 PM

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That's just the reading on the 4th. They're missing the reading on the 5th, which was when the -36F supposedly occurred. 

 

Yes.   The -36F record from the 5th used to be in there, but it was purged in recent years.  I just assumed that there was something wrong with the reading, but I don't know the reason that it was purged.   Maybe is was just purged by mistake?  

Also, some sources purge all the really low April readings in 1945 and list -12F in 1973 as the record low for April.  

 

If it is real, then it would be a very impressive reading since if you eliminate the 1945 readings, the next coldest reading is -12F and there are 85 years of records available.  

 

Also, as you mention, the Elisabethtown station was operating in that same time period and is only five miles away.   Normally they have similar temperatures, but during that cold snap Elisabethtown was -15F.   It seems strange that Eagle Nest would be 21F colder for just that cold snap, when they usually have similar temperatures.  

 

I suspect that there may have been something wrong with the Eagle Nest readings in April 1945.  If it is legitimate though, it is an incredibly impressive reading. 



#81
Scott

Posted 22 September 2016 - 09:22 PM

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On the flip side, which location in the Lower 48 has the least spread between it's record high and record low?

 

It is probably a tougher one to answer.  



#82
wx_statman

Posted 22 September 2016 - 09:54 PM

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This is what I have for April record lows across northern tier states (as well as southern Canada)...corrections welcome.

Washington: -7 Lake Keechelus 4/1/1936
Oregon: -23 Meacham 4/1/1936
Idaho: -22 Copper Basin 4/5/1997
Montana: -33 Gates Park 4/2/2002
Wyoming: -29 Lake Yellowstone 4/1/1920
North Dakota: -24 Powers Lake 4/2/1975
South Dakota: -16 Deerfield 4/3/1951
Minnesota: -22 Karlstad 4/6/1979
Wisconsin: -17 Rest Lake 4/1/1923
Michigan: -17 Champion Van Riper Park 4/4/1954 (official), Bergland -34 4/1/1923 (unofficial)
New York: -24 North Lake 4/1/1923
Vermont: -13 Mt Mansfield 4/7/1982
New Hampshire: -20 Mt Washington 4/5/1995
Maine: -14 Clayton Lake 4/2/1964

BC: -31 Smith River 4/1/1954
Alberta: -38 Peace River 4/2/1954
Saskatchewan: -40 Key Lake 4/1/1996
Manitoba: -35 Port Nelson 4/14/1923
Ontario: -35 Hornepayne 4/2/1932
Quebec: -35 Doucet 4/1/1923
 

 

FWIW I still consider the -34F at Bergland on 4/1/1923 the official state record low for MI for April, though I understand the skepticism. I'm certainly open to the idea that this reading was not taken with a properly calibrated/sited thermometer. Outside of that reading - Watersmeet, MI fell to -20F on 4/7/1982 (Champion Van Riper Park fell to -16F & Ironwood and Kenton both fell to -12F that day so I would say that reading is corroborated). Champion Van Riper Park also hit -17F on 4/10/1997 in addition to 4/4/1954. I also have a remarkably late -16F on 4/10/1909 at Lac View Desert, MI.

 

Rest Lake, WI supposedly fell to -20F in April 1924 but their daily summary stats show -17F on 4/1/1923 as the monthly record, which is what you have. The monthly state records table @ Infoplease has the -20F reading:

 

http://www.infopleas...a/A0930270.html

 

Upon closer inspection this appears to be a typographical error. Unfortunately those Infoplease tables are full of errors and inaccurate/unverifiable readings. The original COOP form for April 1924 shows -15F on the 1st. Its pretty remarkable that Rest Lake was that cold exactly a year to the date after 4/1/1923, but no -20F reading can be found:

 

http://www1.ncdc.noa...30312108575.pdf

 

Interestingly enough, Stanley, ID hit -30F in the same cold wave (on 3/30/1924). Just two days later and this reading would have blown away the official state record low for April of -21F in 1936 @ Alpha. 

 

Wyoming has had a couple close calls with the official state record of -29F @ Lake Yellowstone on 4/1/1920. Old Faithful was -28F on 4/5/1936 and Moran was -28F on 4/3/1945.

 

Dubois, WY hit a ridiculously late -13F on 4/30/1909. This may be a legitimate reading as Cheyenne was 10F that morning and Dubois is a colder location.

 

For South Dakota, Deerfield 4NW has a reading of -22F on the books on 4/2/1975. I notice you have -16F as the state record low for April? I also have Rochford with a ridiculously late -15F on 4/13/1997.

 

For Minnesota, also -22F at Tower on 4/6/1982. And an incredible -32F on 3/31/1975 at Tower (corroborated by -24F at Gunflint Lake 10NW that morning).

 

For Maine, also -14F @ Squa Pan Dam on 4/2/1964. The Clayton Lake reading appears to be from 4/1/1964, not 4/2/1964 as you have listed. I see Clayton Lake has also hit -24F on 3/29/1974.

 

For Alberta, I also have -38.9C (-38F) at Fort Vermillion on 4/4/1920. Identical to the -38.9C (-38F) at Peace River on 4/2/1954 that you have.

 

For Manitoba, I have a close call @ Brochet with -34F on 4/11/1961 and -33F at Wanless on 4/4/1936.

 

Also worth noting that Wabush Lake, Labrador has seen -35F on 4/7/1969.


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#83
wx_statman

Posted 22 September 2016 - 10:12 PM

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I was thinking it was a tie between Fort Vermilion and Iroquois Falls, but I was unaware of the 103F in Fort Vermilion (I have only seen records up to 101F).  When was the 103F recorded?

 

Supposedly on May 15, 1912. Yeah that definitely looks bogus. Too early in the season to be that hot so far north. Now that I'm taking a closer look at that station, summer 1912 appears suspiciously hot since monthly record highs were supposedly set in May, June, and August. I'm guess an over-exposed thermo? The legitimate all-time record high appears to be 100F on 7/18/1941 (a verifiable historic heat wave), giving this station a range of 178F.



#84
wx_statman

Posted 22 September 2016 - 10:15 PM

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I was thinking it was a tie between Fort Vermilion and Iroquois Falls, but I was unaware of the 103F in Fort Vermilion (I have only seen records up to 101F).  When was the 103F recorded?

 

Some other large ranges:

Fort Good Hope:   -79F to 95F

Fort Smith:  -71F to 103

Parshall, ND:  -60F to 112F

Steele, ND:  -46F to 121F (probably the most impressive record high of any location I can think of and it appears legitimate)

Mc Intosh, SD:  -58F to 112F

 

I live just east of Maybell Colorado.   The range isn't quite as large here, but is still fairly impressive with -61F to 102F.  

Many places in Alaska have huge ranges.   Just a few are below.

Allakaket:  -75F to 94F

Aniak:  -72F to 87F

Bettles:  -70F to 93F

Chandlar Lake:  -74F to 90F

Chicken:  -72F to 91F

Circle:  -67F to 94F

Coldfoot:  -74F to 88F (impressive since the weather station was only operable for 7 years)

College:  -66F to 94F

Eagle:  -71F to 95F

Fairbanks:  -66F to 99F (if the 99F is accurate?)

Galena:  -70F to 92F

Hughes:  -68F to 90F

Kobuk:  -68F to 92F

Minchumina:  -66F to 92F

North Pole:  -67F to 95F

Northway:  -72F to 91F

Prospect Creek:  -80F to 87F (impressive since only 9 years of data is available)

Tanana:  -76F to 94F

Tok:  -71F to 96F

 

Outside of the Western US and Northern Plains, I always thought Warsaw Missouri, with -40F to 118F has a pretty impressive spread.

 

There are some outstanding ranges in the Yukon as well. Mayo has a 177F spread between its all-time records of 97F and -80F.



#85
wx_statman

Posted 22 September 2016 - 10:24 PM

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On the flip side, which location in the Lower 48 has the least spread between it's record high and record low?

 

It is probably a tougher one to answer.  

 

Key West? The spread there is 56F (97 to 41).

 

On the west coast probably Eureka @ 67F (87 to 20). At least among stations with a long POR. There are probably other coastal CA stations with shorter POR's that have a smaller spread though.



#86
BLI snowman

Posted 22 September 2016 - 10:29 PM

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Key West? The spread there is 56F (97 to 41).

 

On the west coast probably Eureka @ 67F (87 to 20). At least among stations with a long POR. There are probably other coastal CA stations with shorter POR's that have a smaller spread though.

 

Yeah, I would think it would have to be Key West.

 

The Keys are the only stretch of the lower 48 that hasn't seen a freeze (up to Tavernier) in modern records.



#87
wx_statman

Posted 22 September 2016 - 10:42 PM

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Yeah, I would think it would have to be Key West.

 

The Keys are the only stretch of the lower 48 that hasn't seen a freeze (up to Tavernier) in modern records.

 

I would be shocked if it was any other location. Looks like I was off by 1F though. Spread appears to be 57F (98 to 41). 



#88
wx_statman

Posted 22 September 2016 - 10:54 PM

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Another impressive one was mid November 1955 for the Pacific Northwest and the west side of the Rockies.  Even Salt Lake City dropped down to -14F.   Seattle dropped to 6F and Olympia -1F.  No other November cold snap even comes close.   It was especially impressive since it happened on November 15-16 rather than late in the month.  

 

Well yeah, that's the most impressive one of them all. I thought we were trying to bring to light other out-of-season cold waves, since 1955 was so obvious. 


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#89
IbrChris

Posted 23 September 2016 - 12:05 AM

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FWIW I still consider the -34F at Bergland on 4/1/1923 the official state record low for MI for April, though I understand the skepticism. I'm certainly open to the idea that this reading was not taken with a properly calibrated/sited thermometer. Outside of that reading - Watersmeet, MI fell to -20F on 4/7/1982 (Champion Van Riper Park fell to -16F & Ironwood and Kenton both fell to -12F that day so I would say that reading is corroborated). Champion Van Riper Park also hit -17F on 4/10/1997 in addition to 4/4/1954. I also have a remarkably late -16F on 4/10/1909 at Lac View Desert, MI.

 

Rest Lake, WI supposedly fell to -20F in April 1924 but their daily summary stats show -17F on 4/1/1923 as the monthly record, which is what you have. The monthly state records table @ Infoplease has the -20F reading:

 

http://www.infopleas...a/A0930270.html

 

Upon closer inspection this appears to be a typographical error. Unfortunately those Infoplease tables are full of errors and inaccurate/unverifiable readings. The original COOP form for April 1924 shows -15F on the 1st. Its pretty remarkable that Rest Lake was that cold exactly a year to the date after 4/1/1923, but no -20F reading can be found:

 

http://www1.ncdc.noa...30312108575.pdf

 

Interestingly enough, Stanley, ID hit -30F in the same cold wave (on 3/30/1924). Just two days later and this reading would have blown away the official state record low for April of -21F in 1936 @ Alpha. 

 

Wyoming has had a couple close calls with the official state record of -29F @ Lake Yellowstone on 4/1/1920. Old Faithful was -28F on 4/5/1936 and Moran was -28F on 4/3/1945.

 

Dubois, WY hit a ridiculously late -13F on 4/30/1909. This may be a legitimate reading as Cheyenne was 10F that morning and Dubois is a colder location.

 

For South Dakota, Deerfield 4NW has a reading of -22F on the books on 4/2/1975. I notice you have -16F as the state record low for April? I also have Rochford with a ridiculously late -15F on 4/13/1997.

 

For Minnesota, also -22F at Tower on 4/6/1982. And an incredible -32F on 3/31/1975 at Tower (corroborated by -24F at Gunflint Lake 10NW that morning).

 

For Maine, also -14F @ Squa Pan Dam on 4/2/1964. The Clayton Lake reading appears to be from 4/1/1964, not 4/2/1964 as you have listed. I see Clayton Lake has also hit -24F on 3/29/1974.

 

For Alberta, I also have -38.9C (-38F) at Fort Vermillion on 4/4/1920. Identical to the -38.9C (-38F) at Peace River on 4/2/1954 that you have.

 

For Manitoba, I have a close call @ Brochet with -34F on 4/11/1961 and -33F at Wanless on 4/4/1936.

 

Also worth noting that Wabush Lake, Labrador has seen -35F on 4/7/1969.

Thanks. Don't know how I missed that April record at Watersmeet...I have the Sept record low as 9 on 28/1942 at Watersmeet yet the April record evaded me somehow.

The Bergland reading just seems a stretch given other areas in the Arrowhead of MN which are generally colder weren't in the -30s in that event...however I noted it. Would be an interesting case study for Christopher Burt but most people don't seem to care about record temps unless they are superlatives for the entire year (all-time records).

As an aside the data from Hornepayne, Ontario is worth looking at...at face value it appears to be the "Stanley" or "Fraser" of the east...considering its fairly low latitude for Canada (49 N). The station is located east of Lake Superior in south-central Ontario. Some notable records:

-62 2/1/1957
-35 4/2/1932
10 6/2/1919
15 7/8/1922
19 8/29/1922
-17 10/28/1933
-62 12/27/1933

The location seems to be absolutely frigid in every season.


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#90
Scott

Posted 23 September 2016 - 06:29 AM

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I would be shocked if it was any other location. Looks like I was off by 1F though. Spread appears to be 57F (98 to 41). 

 

Key West is a possible answer since it has a weather station spanning more than 100 years, but there are some other places that vary even less.

 

The Farallon Island weather station is no longer operating, but there is about 30 years of data available.  Since it was a climate study, the data seems very accurate.  

 

The Farallon Islands are 26 miles off the coast of the Golden Gate Bridge.   Since they are 26 miles off the coast, they are protected from the occasional down slope winds that cause heat waves in San Francisco and being 26 miles from the mainland, they are protected from cold snaps as well.

 

The record low in the Farallon Islands was 38F and the record high is 81F.     Since the temperature varies so little there, even if the weather station did last more than 100 years, it seems doubtful that the range could be as great as that of Key West.
 

 

On the west coast probably Eureka @ 67F (87 to 20). At least among stations with a long POR. There are probably other coastal CA stations with shorter POR's that have a smaller spread though.

 

 

On the mainland, Chris Burt says that Point Pierdas Blancas in California has a record low of 29 and a record high of 85F, but WRCC says that a 91F was recorded on October 21 1965.  Point Pierdas Blancas has 55 years of data, so it might win out over Eureka, even if the 91F is legitimate.  

 

On another note, if the 91F is not legitimate, that would make the record high of 85F on December 6 1959!

 

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

Outside the Lower 48, the least variable place in Alaska with a fairly long period of record might be the Shemya Air Force Base in the Aleutian Islands with a range of 7F to 64F (46 years of data).    

 

Amchitka, also in the Aleutians has a record low of 16F and a record high of 60F, and the temperature on average does vary less than Shemya, but the station has too much missing data to say that temperatures don't vary from those ranges.  

 

In Hawaii, the range at Honomu Mauka is only 35F, with a range of 49F to 84F with 26 years of record.   Even if the weather station lasted longer, temperatures probably wouldn't stray much from this range since they don't vary much from year to year.   It might have the least variable temperature range in Hawaii and the US.


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#91
wx_statman

Posted 23 September 2016 - 01:29 PM

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Thanks. Don't know how I missed that April record at Watersmeet...I have the Sept record low as 9 on 28/1942 at Watersmeet yet the April record evaded me somehow.

The Bergland reading just seems a stretch given other areas in the Arrowhead of MN which are generally colder weren't in the -30s in that event...however I noted it. Would be an interesting case study for Christopher Burt but most people don't seem to care about record temps unless they are superlatives for the entire year (all-time records).

As an aside the data from Hornepayne, Ontario is worth looking at...at face value it appears to be the "Stanley" or "Fraser" of the east...considering its fairly low latitude for Canada (49 N). The station is located east of Lake Superior in south-central Ontario. Some notable records:

-62 2/1/1957
-35 4/2/1932
10 6/2/1919
15 7/8/1922
19 8/29/1922
-17 10/28/1933
-62 12/27/1933

The location seems to be absolutely frigid in every season.

 

Thanks for bringing Hornepayne to my attention. I had never heard of that town before. Armstrong at 50N seems to be another cold spot. Hit -50F on 3/2/1943. Also -33F on 4/2/1932, just 2F from the reading in Hornepayne that morning.

 

Regarding April 1923, there are a number of readings from ON to possibly lend credibility to the Bergland reading:

 

-32F at Savanne (49N) on the 1st

-30F at Hornepayne (49N) on the 1st

-30F at Sioux Lookout (50N) on the 2nd

 

Also -35F at Doucet, QC (48N) on the 1st which you already have as the April record for Quebec. Just something to consider.

 

Digging around some more, I've found readings from April 1982 that exceed the provincial records you have listed for both SK and MB. Carswell Lake, SK at -41F on 4/1/1982. This station only existed from 1980-85 and is located in the far north @ 58.5 latitude. And Ruttan Lake, MB at -36F on 4/2/1982. I also found another -35F in MB @ Laurie River Power Site on 4/11/1961.

 

I've found colder readings for BC and AB as well. Dawson Creek, BC at -37F on 4/2/1954 and Beatton River, BC at -33F on 4/1/1954. In Alberta, the morning of 4/2/1954 brought -41F to Springdale, -40F to Keg River, and -39F to Embarras. 

 

I've located a colder reading for Ontario as well. A station called "Central Patricia" hit -37F on 4/6/1972. This reading is corroborated by -33F at Geraldton as well as several other readings in the -25F to -30F range. 


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#92
wx_statman

Posted 23 September 2016 - 02:03 PM

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Key West is a possible answer since it has a weather station spanning more than 100 years, but there are some other places that vary even less.

 

The Farallon Island weather station is no longer operating, but there is about 30 years of data available.  Since it was a climate study, the data seems very accurate.  

 

The Farallon Islands are 26 miles off the coast of the Golden Gate Bridge.   Since they are 26 miles off the coast, they are protected from the occasional down slope winds that cause heat waves in San Francisco and being 26 miles from the mainland, they are protected from cold snaps as well.

 

The record low in the Farallon Islands was 38F and the record high is 81F.     Since the temperature varies so little there, even if the weather station did last more than 100 years, it seems doubtful that the range could be as great as that of Key West.
 

 

On the mainland, Chris Burt says that Point Pierdas Blancas in California has a record low of 29 and a record high of 85F, but WRCC says that a 91F was recorded on October 21 1965.  Point Pierdas Blancas has 55 years of data, so it might win out over Eureka, even if the 91F is legitimate.  

 

On another note, if the 91F is not legitimate, that would make the record high of 85F on December 6 1959!

 

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

Outside the Lower 48, the least variable place in Alaska with a fairly long period of record might be the Shemya Air Force Base in the Aleutian Islands with a range of 7F to 64F (46 years of data).    

 

Amchitka, also in the Aleutians has a record low of 16F and a record high of 60F, and the temperature on average does vary less than Shemya, but the station has too much missing data to say that temperatures don't vary from those ranges.  

 

In Hawaii, the range at Honomu Mauka is only 35F, with a range of 49F to 84F with 26 years of record.   Even if the weather station lasted longer, temperatures probably wouldn't stray much from this range since they don't vary much from year to year.   It might have the least variable temperature range in Hawaii and the US.

 

Very interesting information about the Farallon Islands. I'm very familiar with that area (I was an Earth Science major @ UC-Santa Cruz) but I've never seen official weather data for the Farallons. That seems like a believable range though. I have a hard time seeing that location rising much above 80 or dropping much below 35 or so, even without seeing any data first hand. That may very well be the "champion" in the lower 48. 

 

Regarding Point Piedras Blanca, I definitely consider the 91F on 10/21/1965 to be legitimate. That was an impressive ridge of high pressure w/downslope heating. I'm aware of other all-time record highs further up the coast during that event, including 96F at Fort Bragg on the 23rd (period of record 1948-1972). 

 

Looking around the CA coast - Point Reyes only ranged from 90 to 31 in a period of record from 1914-1943. That's a very exposed location. 



#93
wx_statman

Posted 23 September 2016 - 02:15 PM

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BTW the world record for lowest temperature spread over a 30 year baseline was supposedly 22F at Garapan, on the island of Saipan in the Northern Mariana Islands. Range of 68 to 90 degrees. I remember reading this information in my 1994 Guinness Book of World Records, a book that I read cover to cover in the days before the Internet. The Garapan entry was under "Most Equable Temperature in the World." Looking at the data on Wikipedia shows an all-time spread of 27F, from 63 to 90 degrees. 

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saipan

 

There is little seasonal temperature variation and Saipan has been cited by the Guinness Book of World Recordsas having the least fluctuating temperatures in the world.



#94
wx_statman

Posted 23 September 2016 - 02:50 PM

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On the subject of outrageously cold readings late in the season, I like the -30F at Helena, MT on 3/25/1955. A monthly record low set on the 25th! In a period of record going back to 1880, their next coldest March reading is -26F on 3/8/1951. Their next-latest reading even as low as -20F is on 3/15/1906. 



#95
Scott

Posted 23 September 2016 - 03:56 PM

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On the subject of outrageously cold readings late in the season, I like the -30F at Helena, MT on 3/25/1955. A monthly record low set on the 25th! In a period of record going back to 1880, their next coldest March reading is -26F on 3/8/1951. Their next-latest reading even as low as -20F is on 3/15/1906. 

 

Any thoughts of the -30F reading on April 27 1970 at White Mountain 2?  I suspect that it isn't legitimate, but if it is, it is the perhaps the most impressive out of season cold snap that I have seen for a weather station:

 

 

983465.JPG

 

The next impressive would be the one in April at Eagle Nest, if that reading really is correct.  You would have to go back to February 12 to find a colder daily record at that station.  

Another impressive out of season cold snap in the one along the Front Range of Colorado in April 1975.  Even Denver dropped below zero and some stations had readings almost as cold as the March records.

 

I've never seen official weather data for the Farallons.

 

 

Christopher Burt has some of the data (including the extremes) in his book, if you have that one (at least it's in the updated revised edition; the only one I have):

https://www.amazon.c...asap_bc?ie=UTF8



#96
Front Ranger

Posted 23 September 2016 - 04:13 PM

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Since we're on April, I wonder what the coldest reliable April temperature is for the Lower 48 (besides Peter Sinks of course)?

 

Some sites say Eagle Nest (New Mexico), with a reading of -36F.   This is apparently an unreliable reading as the WRCC has the revised reading at no lower than -21F.

 

Bergland (Michigan) supposedly had a -34F during an April cold snap in 1923.   Breckenridge (Colorado) has a very old April reading of -35F in 1891, but if it is accurate, I assume that it was probably recorded at one of the high mountain mines around Breckenridge, of which many exist.   White Mountain 2 (California), and Fraser (Colorado) both have reliable readings of -30F in April, and of course there is the one for Summit (Montana).

 

There aren't that many -30F or lower readings in the lower 48 for April. 

 

It's interesting, looking on the WRCC site, the data only goes back to 1893, and the April record is listed as -16, so I very much doubt that -35. However, the March record is listed as -66, 26 degrees colder than their January record!  :lol:

 

http://www.wrcc.dri....iMAIN.pl?co0909


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#97
Front Ranger

Posted 23 September 2016 - 04:30 PM

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As far as top-tier out of peak season cold waves are concerned, Nov 11-13, 2014 was a doozy. 

 

A sampling...

 

-27 at Casper, their November record by 6 degrees. And it occurred on the 12th.

 

-27 at Douglas, WY, their November record by 4 degrees and coldest temp until 12/9

 

-21 at Riverton, WY, their earliest temp that cold on record

 

-10 at DEN, November record and coldest temp until 12/5. Also November record low max of 5.

 

-11 at Boulder, coldest temp before 11/27 (records back to 1893)

 

High of 7 in Colorado Springs, earliest that cold by far, and tying their November record.

 

High of 11 at Pueblo, record for November and coldest until 12/6


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#98
Scott

Posted 23 September 2016 - 04:30 PM

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It's interesting, looking on the WRCC site, the data only goes back to 1893, and the April record is listed as -16, so I very much doubt that -35. However, the March record is listed as -66, 26 degrees colder than their January record!  :lol:

 

http://www.wrcc.dri....iMAIN.pl?co0909

 

If you look at that link though, it says that temperatures were only taken 1.5% of the time.  It's hard to establish any records in places where temperatures are only taken 1.5% of the time.   I wouldn't trust the temperatures from that station (including the -66F).   For that area, the Dillon station is a much better one to look at since it has temperatures taken 97.5% of the time:

 

http://www.wrcc.dri....iMAIN.pl?co2281

 

I suspect that if the -35F (official Colorado state record for April) is accurate, it was probably taken at one of the high elevation mines and not in the town itself.  Some of the basins in that area actually have recorded verified April temperatures not much warmer than that reading, such as the -29F at Antero Reservoir on April 4 1970.  Dillon, near Breckenridge recorded a -25F on April 1 1924.  Fraser recorded a -30F on April 4 1970.  Based on verified readings, -35F is plausible in the high mountain basins, but I suspect the Breckenridge reading wasn't taken in town.



#99
IbrChris

Posted 23 September 2016 - 06:02 PM

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Thanks for bringing Hornepayne to my attention. I had never heard of that town before. Armstrong at 50N seems to be another cold spot. Hit -50F on 3/2/1943. Also -33F on 4/2/1932, just 2F from the reading in Hornepayne that morning.

 

Regarding April 1923, there are a number of readings from ON to possibly lend credibility to the Bergland reading:

 

-32F at Savanne (49N) on the 1st

-30F at Hornepayne (49N) on the 1st

-30F at Sioux Lookout (50N) on the 2nd

 

Also -35F at Doucet, QC (48N) on the 1st which you already have as the April record for Quebec. Just something to consider.

 

Digging around some more, I've found readings from April 1982 that exceed the provincial records you have listed for both SK and MB. Carswell Lake, SK at -41F on 4/1/1982. This station only existed from 1980-85 and is located in the far north @ 58.5 latitude. And Ruttan Lake, MB at -36F on 4/2/1982. I also found another -35F in MB @ Laurie River Power Site on 4/11/1961.

 

I've found colder readings for BC and AB as well. Dawson Creek, BC at -37F on 4/2/1954 and Beatton River, BC at -33F on 4/1/1954. In Alberta, the morning of 4/2/1954 brought -41F to Springdale, -40F to Keg River, and -39F to Embarras. 

 

I've located a colder reading for Ontario as well. A station called "Central Patricia" hit -37F on 4/6/1972. This reading is corroborated by -33F at Geraldton as well as several other readings in the -25F to -30F range. 

Thanks for the new info...I admit my examination of provincial records wasn't comprehensive due to the massive amount of time necessary to gather and vet each station's data. Any trick you use to find the absolute values quickly?


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#100
IbrChris

Posted 23 September 2016 - 06:41 PM

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I'll post what I have on the provincial monthly max/mins and if WxStatman would like he can examine them:

Alberta

Jan: 70 Pekisko 25/1906; -78 Ft Vermilion 11/1911
Feb: 77 Pekisko 2/1906; -71 Ft Vermilion 1/1917
Mar: 84 Medicine Hat 23/1911; -53 Ft Vermilion 4/1955
Apr: 96 Medicine Hat 26/1910; -41 Springdale 2/1954 (thx WxStatman)

May: 99 Medicine Hat 5/1911; -18 Lake Louise 1/1954
Jun: 107 Medicine Hat 21/1900; 14 Lake Louise 1/1919
Jul: 110  Ft Macleod 18/1941; 19 Lake Louise 8/1981
Aug: 107 Empress 5/1961; 18 Lake Louise 28/1995
Sep: 101 Empress 5/1967; -13 Lake Louise 24/1926
Oct: 93 Medicine Hat 6/1889; -33 High Level 31/1984
Nov: 80 Pekisko 15/1905; -52 Sion 30/1919
Dec: 77 Ft Macleod 8/1903; -72 Ft Vermilion 31/1933

British Columbia

Jan: 69 Port Alice & Dawsons Ldg 12/1986; -74 Smith River 31/1947
Feb: 69 Abbotsford 27/1968; -62 Smith River 2/1968
Mar: 75 Barriere 30/1994; -58 Arras 2/1976
Apr: 97 Lillooet 21/1934; -37 Dawson Creek 2/1954
May: 107 Lillooet 30/1936; 2 Sierra 2/1974
Jun: 108 Hedley 27/2015; 21 Whistler Roundhouse 1/1984
Jul: 112 Lillooet; Lytton & Barriere 17/1941; 24 Whistler Roundhouse 13/1984
Aug: 107 Lytton 9/1981; 16 Yoho NP Wapta Lake 12/1975
Sep: 102 Lytton 3/1988; -2 Smith River 26/1951
Oct: 88 Kamloops 6/1980; -35 Yoyo 30/1984
Nov: 74 Lillooet 3/1927; -54 Smith River 24/1955
Dec: 72 Lillooet 3/1933; -63 Puntzi Mountain 29/1968

Manitoba:

Jan: 50 Indian Bay 22/1942; -63 Norway House 9/1899
Feb: 60 Emerson 25/1958; -61 Brochet 18/1966
Mar: 76 Dauphin 24/1993; -56 Bird 10/1963
Apr: 99 Emerson 27/1952; -36 Ruttan Lake 2/1982
May: 106 Emerson & Deloraine 30/1934; -13 Churchill 4/1983
Jun: 108 Brandon & Minnedosa 17/1931; 14 Gillam 2/1977
Jul: 112 Emerson & St Albans 11/1936; 24 Birtle 6/1934
Aug: 106 Starbuck 6/1988; 16 Russell 31/1886
Sep: 103 Starbuck 2/1983; 6 Russell 28/1945
Oct: 92 Altona 1/1992; -25 Brochet 27/1972
Nov: 77 Altona 5/1975; -44 Brochet 27/1966
Dec: 61 Deloraine 3/1925; -60 York Factory 31/1900

Ontario

Jan: 64 Windsor 25/1950; -73 Iroquois Falls 23/1935
Feb: 69 Windsor 26/2000; -62 Hornepayne 1/1957
Mar: 80 Windsor 30/1986; -50 Crystal Falls 3/1950
Apr: 90 Toronto 22/1842; -37 Central Patricia 6/1972
May: 97 Owen Sound 19/1911; -11 White River 1/1903
Jun: 104 Pickle Lake 19/1933; 10 Hornepayne 2/1919
Jul: 108 Ft Frances 13/1936; 15 Hornepayne 8/1922
Aug: 104 Harrow 6/1918; 19 Hornepayne 29/1922
Sep: 100 Toronto 2/1953; 0 Ft Frances 21/1949
Oct: 90 Windsor 6/1963; -17 Hornepayne 28/1933
Nov: 79 Windsor 1/1950; -47 Emo Radbourne 29/1985
Dec: 68 Toronto 3/1982; -62 Hornepayne 27/1933

Quebec

Jan: 63 Ormstown 15/1995; -60 Ft McKenzie 19/1946
Feb: 64 Ormstown 22/1981; -66 Doucet 5/1923
Mar: 78 Oka 28/1945; -53 Poste Montagnais 13/1984
Apr: 87 Ste Martine 27/1990; -35 Doucet 1/1923
May: 96 Ville Marie 29/1929; -20 Ft McKenzie 1/1947
Jun: 100 Ville Marie 11/1956; 14 Poste Montagnais 5/1992
Jul: 104 Ville Marie 6/1921; 20 Inukjuak 8/1937
Aug: 98 Ste Martine 2/1975; 23 Fermont 31/1996
Sep: 93 Ormstown 5/1973; 5 Fermont 30/1992
Oct: 85 Ste Martine 2/1968; -9 Poste Montagnais 22/1974
Nov: 75 Oka 8/1938; -35 Poste Montagnais 20/1986
Dec: 68 Ormstown 5/2001; -56 Poste Montagnais 13/1980

Saskatchewan

Jan: 64 Maple Creek North 22/1981; -67 Butte St Pierre 25/1972
Feb: 67 Maple Creek North 27/1992; -70 Prince Albert 1/1893
Mar: 77 Midale 27/1946; -59 Key Lake 4/1995
Apr: 94 Beechy 29/1939; -41 Carswell Lake 1/1982

May: 105 Cypress Hills 29/1988; -16 Uranium City 4/2002
Jun: 110 Kincaid 5/1988; 18 Waseca 2/1919

Jul: 113 Midale & Yellow Grass 5/1937; 25 Waseca 24/1918
Aug: 110 Maple Creek North 5/1961; 23 Midale 24/1934
Sep: 104 Lost River 4/1940; -4 Cameo 30/1961
Oct: 93 Abbey 1/1957; -22 Val-Marie 29/1991
Nov: 78 Beechy 7/1999; -49 Prince Albert 23/1884
Dec: 69 Aneroid 5/1939; -59 Pilger 28/1917

I'll add the Arctic and the Maritimes tomorrow. Any corrections welcome :)
 


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