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Utah Monthly State Temperature Records Narrative

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#1
Scott

Posted 21 October 2016 - 09:14 PM

Scott

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Mine won't be as good as the one from Chris, but here's what I have for Utah:

 

January

 

-Utah’s record high for the month is 80 at Lytle Ranch on 1/31/2003. This was a well known heat event, but for some reason online sites haven't updated the value yet.  Average daytime temperatures at Lytle Ranch are the hottest in Utah, beating Saint George.   Records at Lytle Ranch have only been kept since 1988, so eventually Lytle Ranch may exceed many of the older state records recorded at St George.  

 

-Honorable mention:

  • 76 at Lytle Ranch on 1/9/2015
  • 74 at Wah Wah Ranch on 1/7/1969
  • 74 at Lytle Ranch on 1/12/1996
  • 74 at Lytle Ranch on 1/18/1994
  • 74 La Verkin on 1/21/1971
  • 73 at Zion National Park on 1/20/1971
  • 73 at Lytle Ranch on 1/27/2015

 

-Utah’s official record low for the month is -50 at Strawberry Tunnel on 1/5/1913, but the Logan Canyon sinks have beaten this several times.   Strawberry Tunnel is a very cold location (average January low was -2.4 during the period of record), but unfortunately, the weather station only lasted a few years since the readings were taken by the construction crew for the tunnel between 1906 to 1917.

 

-Honorable mentions (the -65 at Woodruff is non-official):

  • -65 at Woodruff 1/14/1888 (this reading is in the History of Rich County available in public libraries)
  • -51 at Sage Creek Ranch on 1/31/1985 (If the -65F at Woodruff isn't valid, this may be the coldest temperature in Utah recorded at a place where someone was living).
  • -47 at Woodruff on 1/29/1949 (Perhaps the coldest official reading at a Utah town in January).
  • -45 at Scofield Dam on 1/8/1982
  • -45 at Woodruff on 1/25/1949
  • -44 at Lewiston on 1/21/1937
  • -44 at Woodruff on 1/21/1930
  • -43 at Ouray on 1/2/1979
  • -43 at Woorduff on 1/1/1979
  • -43 at Woodruff on 1/22/1930
  • -43 at Duchene on 1/9/1937
  • -42F at Green River on 1/22/1937 (honorable because it was recorded at a low elevation desert location that is extremely hot in the summer).

-Utah Sinks:

  • -65 at Peter Sinks on 1/31/1985
  • -64 at Peter Sinks on 1/18/1984
  • -65 at Peter Sinks on 1/31/1985
  • -64 at Peter Sinks on 1/18/1984
  • -62 at Middle Sink on 1/29/2002
  • -54 at Peter Sinks on 1/6/2017
  • -53 at Peter Sinks on 1/5/2017
  • -53 at Middle Sink on 1/4/2009
  • -46 at Middle Sink on 1/25/1989
  • -46 at Peter Sinks on 1/13/2013
  • -46 at Peter Sinks on 1/14/2013

 

February

 

-Utah’s record high for the month is probably 84 at St George on 2/25/1986, 2/26/1986, and 2/27/1986. Zion National Park has a reported 89 on 2/25/1904 and Green River has a reported 86 on 2/15/1907, but both of these seem dubious.

 

-Honorable mention:

  • 83 at St George on 2/28/1986
  • 81 at Zion National Park on 2/26/1986
  • 81 at St George on 2/24/1986
  • 81 at Lytle Ranch on 2/25/1989 (had the Lytle Ranch station existed in 1986, it would have likely beaten this).
  • 80 at La Verkin on 2/21/1995
  • 80 at La Verkin on 2/24/1989
  • 80 at La Verkin on 2/25/1986
  • 80 at La Verkin on 2/26/1986
  • 80 at Lytle Ranch on 2/16/2015
  • 80 at St George on 2/12/1996
  • 80 at St George on 2/13/1996
  • 80 at Zion National Park on 2/28/1921
  • 80 at La Verkin on 2/27/1986

-Utah’s record low for the month is either -50 at Woodruff on 2/6/1899 or -69.3 at Peter Sinks on 2/1/1985.   

               
 -Honorable mention:

  • -48 at Electric Lake on 2/5/1989
  • -48 at Scofield Dam on 2/6/1989
  • -47 at Roosevelt on 2/6/1989
  • -46 at Woodruff on 2/6/1989
  • -45 at Woodruff on 2/1/1985
  • -44 at Roosevelt on 2/7/1989
  • -44 at Randolf on 2/5/1982
  • -44 at Woodruff on 2/7/1989
  • -44 at Woodruff on 2/10/1933
  • -43 at Hardware Ranch on 2/5/1982
  • -43 at Duchesne on 1/9/1937
  • -43 at Woorduff on 2/18/1942
  • -43 at Randolf on 2/1/1985

-Utah Sinks

  • -54 at Middle Sink on 2/6/1989 (no readings were taken at Peter Sinks on that day)
  • -49 at Peter Sinks on 2/2/2011
  • -48 at Peter Sinks on 2/1/2011
  • -46 at Peter Sinks on 2/22/2010

 

March

 

-Utah’s record high for the month is 96 at Lytle Ranch on 3/18/2004.  All online sources and almanacs I have seen still say the record is 89 at St George on 3/27/1986, but the 90's were actually reached at several weather stations in March 2004 and March 2007, breaking all the old records.  

 

-Honorable mention:

  • 93 at La Verkin on 3/24/2004
  • 93 at La Verkin on 3/24/2007
  • 93 at Lytle Ranch on 3/22/2007
  • 92 at Lytle Ranch on 3/21/2004
  • 91 at Lytle Ranch on 3/17/2007
  • 91 at St George on 3/21/2004
  • 91 at Zion National Park on 3/17/2007
  • 90 at La Verkin on 3/27/2004
  • 90 at Zion National Park on 3/20/2004
  • 90 at Zion National Park on 3/21/2004
  • 90 at La Verkin on 3/20/2007
  • 90 at St George on 3/20/2004
  • 90 at Lytle Ranch on 3/29/2004

Green River has a reported 90F on 3/14/1904, but this seems dubious.

 

-Utah’s official record low for the month was -37 at Strawberry Tunnel on 3/2/1917, but has been exceeded at Peter Sinks.

 

-Honorable mention:

  •  -32 at Woodruff on 3/1/1903 (perhaps the coldest March temperature recorded in a town in Utah, tied 1966)
  •  -32 at Woodruff on 3/4/1966
  •  -32 at Strawberry Tunnel on 3/19/1906
  •  -31 at Woodruff on 3/3/1917
  •  -30 at Woodruff on 3/7/1964
  •  -30 at Woodruff on 3/8/1964
  •  -30 at Strawberry Highway Station 3/4/1966
  •  -27 at Black Rock on 3/4/1966 (honorable because it is in a very unexpected location in the desert, but is legitimate)

-Utah Sinks:

  •  -52 at Peter Sinks on 3/10/2002
  •  -51 at Peter Sinks on 3/9/2002
  •  -40 at Peter Sinks on 3/25/2013
  •  -37 at Peter Sinks on 3/1/2012
  •  -35 at Peter Sinks on 3/24/2013
  •  -34 at Peter Sinks on 3/5/2013
  •  -31 at Peter Sinks on 3/12/2004

 

April

 

-Utah’s record high for the month is probably 100 which occurred at St George on 4/25/1946 (some almanacs and online sources list the official April record high as 98 in 1898, but the 100 reading does seem legitimate).  Also, there were were two readings of 101 at the St George RAWS recorded on 4/23/2012 and 4/23/2012, but these readings may be a few degrees too high and are not considered to be official.  

 

-Honorable mention:

  • 98 at St George on 4/26/1898
  • 97 at St George on 4/19/1994
  • 97 at St George on 4/20/1994
  • 97 at Lytle Ranch on 4/23/2012
  • 97 at Lytle Ranch on 4/24/2012
  • 97 at Lytle Ranch on 4/29/2007
  • 97 at La Verkin on 4/28/2007
  • 97 at Zion National Park on 4/23/2012

-Utahs’s official record low for the month is -19 recorded at Strawberry Tunnel in 1917, but this has been exceeded several times at non-official stations.  

In 2006, I compiled all the SNOTEL data in the Uinta Mountains for average and extremes between 1983 and 2006, but unfortunately I did not record the dates for the extremes.  I will list them anyway.   Maybe in the future I'll update the data with the dates and include the years since 2006.  Some of the June, August, and September readings at the SNOTELs high in the Uinta Mountains approach the readings at Peter Sinks (though not in the winter) and exceed the official records).

 

-Honorable mention:

  • -18 at Soldier Summit on 4/1/1958 (Soldier Summit was a town until 1984, so this may be the coldest April temperature recorded at a town in Utah)
  • -18 at Blacks Fork on 4/4/1918
  • -16 at Electric Lake on 4/6/1983
  • -14 at Blacks Fork on 4/5/1918
  • -13 at Blacks Fork on 4/1/1917
  • -13 at Blacks Fork on 4/3/1918
  • -12 at Scofield on 4/1/1980
  • -11 at Brighton on 4/3/1945
  • -10 at Scofield on 4/8/1982
  • -10 at Brighton on 4/5/1983
  • -10 at Scofield Dam on 4/4/1973
  • -10 at Uintalands on 4/6/1983
  • -10 at Woodruff on 4/2/1936
  • -10 at Blacks Fork on 4/23/1920

-Utah Sinks and SNOTELS:

  • -41 at Middle Sink on 4/1/2008
  • -26 at Peter Sinks on 4/7/2010
  • -23 at Peter Sinks on 4/14/2013
  • -22 at Peter Sinks on 4/13/2013
  • -20 at Lake Fork #1 SNOTEL (elevation 10,415) on 4/13/1997
  • -19 at Peter Sinks on 4/2/2014
  • -19 at Peter Sinks on 4/3/2014
  • -18 at Peter Sinks on 4/7/2013
  • -16 at Hewinta SNOTEL (elevation 9500) on 4/12/1997
  • -16 at Peter Sinks on 4/4/2014
  • -15 at Lake Fork Basin SNOTEL (elevation 10,966) on 4/11/1997
  • -14 at Five Point SNOTEL (elevation 10,940) on 4/12/1997
  • -12 at Brown Duck SNOTEL (elevation 10,600) on 4/13/1997
  • -11 at Trial Lake SNOTEL (elevation 9992) 
  • -11 at Lily Lake SNOTEL (elevation 9050)
  • -11 at Chepeta Lake SNOTEL (elevation 10,300) on 4/13/1997

 

May

 

-Utah’s record high for the month is 110 at Lytle Ranch on 5/27/2003.    Almanacs and online sources have not updated this yet and list the 108 recorded at St George.

 

-Honorable mention:

  • 109 at Lytle Ranch on 5/16/1997
  • 108 at St George on 5/31/1910
  • 108 at St George on 5/28/2003
  • 108 at Lytle Ranch on 5/26/2003
  • 107 at St George on 5/30/1910
  • 106 at La Verkin on 5/28/2003
  • 106 at Zion National Park on 5/28/2003
  • 106 at Lytle Ranch on 5/28/2003
  • 106 at Lytle Ranch on 5/30/2002
  • 106 at Lytle Ranch on 5/31/2002

 

-Utah’s official record low for the month is -1 at Blowhard Mountain on 5/6/2001, but once again this has been exceeded many times at the SNOTEL's and at Peter Sinks.  The reading appears to be legitimate.  Almanacs and online sources haven't been updated yet and still list the 0 at Brighton on 5/6/1965 as the record (this would also be the lowest temperature in Utah recorded at a populated location).

 

-Honorable mention:

  • 1 at Blacks Fork Junction on 5/2/2013
  • 2 at Blacks Fork on 5/3/1917
  • 2 at Blacks Fork on 5/6/1917
  • 2 at Blowhard Mountain on 5/2/1967
  • 4 at Brian Head on 5/1/1995
  • 4 at Strawberry Highway Station on 5/6/1965
  • 4 at Bryce Canyon Airport on 5/2/1951
  • 4 at Blacks Fork on 5/30/1919 (next to Peters Sink, probably the coldest reading in Utah this late in the season).

-Utah Sinks and SNOTELS:

  • -19 at Peter Sinks on 5/12/1983
  • -13 at Peter Sinks on 5/7/2010
  • -8 at Peter Sinks on 5/2/2011
  • -5 at Peter Sinks on 5/2/2011
  • -5 at Lake Fork Basin SNOTEL (elevation 10,966) on 5/11/1999
  • -4 at Lake Fork #1 SNOTEL (elevation 10,415) on 5/1/1990
  • -4 at Lower Hewinta SNOTEL (elevation 6500) on 5/1/2011
  • -2 at Hewinta SNOTEL (elevation 9500) on 5/1/2011
  • -3 at Five Point SNOTEL (elevation 10,940) on 5/11/1999
  • -3 at Peter Sinks on 5/5/2010
  • 0 at Brown Duck SNOTEL (elevation 10,600) on 5/11/1999
  • 0 at Chepeta Lake SNOTEL (elevation 10,300) on 5/11/1999
  • 1 at Trial Lake SNOTEL (elevation 9992) on 5/11/1999
  • 1 at Haystack SNOTEL (elevation 9212) 
  • 1 at Lily Lake SNOTEL (elevation 9050) 
  • 2 at Chepeta Peak (elevation 12,120) on 5/1/2008

 

June

 

-Utahs’s record high for the month is 116 at Saint George on 6/28/1892.   Also, there were were two readings of 117 at the St George RAWS recorded on 6/29/2013 and 6/30/2013, but these readings may be a few degrees too high and are not considered to be official.  

 

-Honorable mention:

  • 115 at St George on 6/12/1918
  • 115 at St George on 6/25/1970
  • 115 at St George on 6/26/1970
  • 114 has been reached many times at St George in June and on 6/22/1954 at Zion National Park

 

-Utah’s record low for the month is probably 3 at Soldier Summit on 6/10/2002, but almanacs and online sources have not been updated yet. Given the cold snap in June 2002, the reading recorded there may be legitimate, but it does seem too cold, even for there.  If the reading is not legitimate, the record is 10 at Blacks Fork in 6/1/1919.   Blacks Fork is a ranger station in the Uinta Mountains and is a very cold location, event though there is no weather station there (other than the nearby SNOTELS) in present times.

 

-Honorable mentions:

  • 11 at Strawberry Tunnel on 6/7/1914
  • 14 at Scofield on 6/9/2011 (this may be the coldest June reading at a town in Utah since even if the Soldier Summit reading is accurate, Soldier Summit cease to be a town in 1984).
  • 15 at Woodruff on 6/1/1927
  • 15 at Scofield on 6/14/1976
  • 15 at Soldier Summit on 6/21/1960
  • 15 at Soldier Summit on 6/7/1954

-Utah Sinks and SNOTELS:

  • 3 at Peter Sinks on 6/5/2001
  • 7 at Lake Fork Basin SNOTEL (elevation 10,966) 
  • 10 at Brown Duck SNOTEL (elevation 10,600) 
  • 10 at Peter Sinks on 6/17/2011
  • 11 at Lake Fork #1 SNOTEL (elevation 10,415) on 6/10/2002
  • 12 at Chepeta Lake SNOTEL (elevation 10,300) on 6/2/1990
  • 12 at Five Point SNOTEL (elevation 10,940) on 6/9/1995
  • 13 at Chepeta Peak (elevation 12,120) on 6/10/2012
  • 15 at Hewinta (elevation 9500) on 6/13/2001

July

 

-Utahs’s official record high for the month is 117 at Saint George on 7/5/1985.  Another possible record is 118 at the St George RAWS on 7/4/2007.   The reading was deemed accurate by some (others dispute the reading), but RAWS are not considered to be official weather stations.   Also of interest, the Wahweap Arizona weather station is only located a few feet from the Utah border and recorded a 120 on 7/16/1997.

 

-Honorable mention:

  • 116 at Arches National Park on 7/13/2003.   (If accurate, this may be the hottest temperature recorded at any station in the United states that is more than 4000 feet in elevation.  The reading might questionable however, as Moab USGS was 110 on that day.  Hansksville did record a 114 during the same heat event).
  • 116 at St George on 7/20/1910
  • 115 at Zion National Park on 7/1/1950
  • 115 at Lytle Ranch on 7/2/2001
  • 115 at Lytle Ranch on 7/10/2003
  • 115 at St George on 7/4/1985
  • 115 at St George on 7/6/1985
  • 115 at St George on 7/16/1925
  • 115 at St George on 7/29/1898
  • 114 at Hanksville on 7/8/1989 (Hanksville is at 4460 feet elevation.  The 1980-2010 average July high is 100.1.   The location gets very hot in summer and very cold in winter.  Hanksville drops below zero several times a year and records temperatures below -30 on occasion).
  • 114 at Hanksville on 7/11/2003
  • 114 at Moab on 7/7/1989 (Moab is at 4000 feet)
  • 114 has also been reached several times at Lytle Ranch and St George.

Hite also had a reading of 115 on 7/10/1901, but it seems dubious.  

 

-Utah’s official record low for the month is often listed as 17 at Tropic on 7/3/1902.   This is an incredible reading at the location, but it seems collaborated by other nearby stations.  I believe that I did find a lower record low though.  There was a 16 at Blacks Fork on 7/3/1921.   This seems to be collaborated by other very cold readings during the cold snap.  Morgan at only 5070 feet and about 3900 feet lower than Blacks Fork recorded a 26 on the same day, which is the coldest July reading at that location.  Manila also has a 28 on the same day.  Myton recorded a 32, colder than the August record low.  Vernal recorded a remarkable 25, which is 7 degrees colder than the August record and only 1 degree warmer than the June record.

 

-Honorable mention:

  • 18 at Antimony on 7/6/1901 (WRCC says 1901, but this might have actually been in 1902?).
  • 18 at Randolf on 7/3/1902
  • 19 at Loa on 7/2/1902
  • 19 at Soldier Creek on 7/5/1971 (this location has some of the coldest nights in Utah, but unfortunately, the weather station only lasted 4 years between 1968-1973.   The station was at the location of the new dam constructed for Strawberry Reservoir during that time period and was very near the Strawberry Tunnel location that produced the official record lows for Utah in January, March, and April).
  • 21 at Park City on 7/7/1913
  • 21 at Woodruff on 7/8/1911
  • 21 at Woodruff at 7/12/1911
  • 21 at Woodruff on 7/3/1902
  • 21 at Blacks Fork on 7/4/1921

-Utah Sinks and Uinta Mountain readings:

  • 13 at Peter Sinks on 7/29/2015
  • 15 at Peter Sinks on 7/11/1984
  • 15 at Henrys Fork Basin on 7/5/1987.  (This temperature was recorded by me at an elevation of 11,050 feet on a clear night after a snowstorm.  The area was subject to cold air pooling).
  • 15 at Amethyst Lake on 7/24/1995.  (This temperature was recorded by me at an elevation of 10,800 feet.   The area is very subject to cold air pooling.  1995 was a heavy snow year with a very cool May and June.   The lake was still mostly frozen over.   By morning, the part of the lake that was not frozen over the previous evening has a fresh layer of ice on it).

 

August

 

-Utahs’s record high for the month is 113 at Saint George on 8/5/1895 and at Lytle Ranch on 8/1/1993 (interestingly during what was an overall cool summer) and on 8/12/2004.  Interestingly, Utah has never recorded a 114 in August, even though that reading has been recorded many times in June and July.   Also of interest, the Wahweap Arizona weather station is only located a few feet from the Utah border and recorded a 115 on 8/7/1995.

 

-Honorable mention:

  • 112 at Zion National Park on 8/16/1939
  • 112 at Lytle Ranch on 8/3/1994
  • 112 at Lytle Ranch on 8/10/2004
  • 112 at Lytle Ranch on 8/11/2004
  • 112 at Lytle Ranch on 8/14/2002
  • 112 at St George on 8/1/1995
  • 112 at St George on 8/2/1995
  • 112 at St George on 8/4/1893
  • 112 at St George at 8/11/1940
  • 111 at Hite on 8/22/1991
  • 111 at La Verkin on 8/7/1981
  • 111 has been reached many times in August at Lytle Ranch and St George

-Utah’s official record low for the month is 17 at Randolf on 8/26/1992, but once again this has been beaten several times at Peter Sinks and at the SNOTELs in the Uinta Mountains.

 

-Honorable mention:

  • 18 at Hardware Ranch on 8/30/1964
  • 19 at Hardware Ranch on 8/27/1996
  • 19 at Hardware Ranch on 8/31/1962
  • 19 at Strawberry Highway Station on 8/29/1964
  • 20 at Strawberry Tunnel on 8/23/1960
  • 20 at Woodruff on 8/26/1992
  • 20 at Woodruff on 8/27/1992
  • 20 at Woodruff on 8/30/1910
  • 20 at Woodruff on 8/31/1965
  • 21 at Randolf on 8/24/1992
  • 21 at Randolf on 8/27/1992
  • 21 at Soldier Summit on 8/22/1974
  • 21 at Ibapah on 8/21/1920
  • 21 at Ibapah on 8/30/1969
  • 21 at Strawberry Tunnel on 8/17/1960
  • 21 at Strawberry Tunnel on 8/31/1962
  • 21 at Blacks Fork on 8/30/1920

-Utah Sinks, SNOTELS, and Uinta Mountain readings:

  • 6 at Peter Sinks on 8/31/2005
  • 7 at Peter Sinks on 8/19/1995
  • 10 at Lake Fork Basin SNOTEL (elevation 10,966)
  • 14 at Peter Sinks on 8/4/2016
  • 16 at Lily Lake SNOTEL (elevation 9050)
  • 18 at Shaler Lake on 8/13/2000 (This temperature was recorded by me at an elevation of 11,000 feet on a clear night.  The area was subject to cold air pooling).
  • 18 at Windy Lake early August 1990 (This temperature was recorded by me at an elevation of 10,400 feet on a clear night.  The area was subject to cold air pooling).
  • 17 at Lower Hewinta SNOTEL (elevation 6500)
  • 18 at Hewinta SNOTEL (elevation 9500) 
  • 21 at Trial Lake SNOTEL (elevation 9992)
  • 21 at Haystack SNOTEL (elevation 9212) 

 

September

 

-Utahs’s record high for the month is 110 at  Zion National Park on 9/1/1950, at Hite on 9/5/1945, and at St George Interm Field on 9/1/1950 (this station only lasted 6 years between 1948 and 1954).

 

-Honorable mention:

  • 109 at Zion National Park on 9/2/1950
  • 109 at Zion National Park on 9/3/1950
  • 109 at St George on 9/1/1995
  • 109 at St George on 9/3/1995
  • 108 at Moab on 9/6/1976
  • 108 at St George Interm Field on 9/2/1950
  • 108 at St George Interm Field on 9/3/1950
  • 108 at St George on 9/4/1995
  • 108 at St George on 9/7/1924
  • 108 at St George on 9/1/1950

-Utah’s official record low for the month is 2 at Woodruff on 9/25/1926, but once again this has been beaten several times at Peter Sinks and at the SNOTELs in the Uinta Mountains.

 

-Honorable mention, including non-official readings:

  • 6 at Clear Creek on 9/18/1965
  • 6 at Brighton on 9/18/1965
  • 7 at Allen S Ranch on 9/18/1965 (as cold as April record)
  • 8 at Scipio on 9/18/1965
  • 8 at Hanna on 9/18/1965
  • 8 at Moon Lake on 9/18/1965
  • 8 at Scofield Dam on 9/18/1965
  • 8 at Randolf on 9/30/1985
  • 8 at Woodruff on 9/19/1978
  • 8 at Woodruff on 9/29/1985

-Utah Sinks and SNOTELS:

  • -10 at Peter Sinks on 9/25/200
  • -3 at Lake Fork Basin SNOTEL (elevation 10,966) on 9/30/1986.  (If this reading is accurate, it is one of the coldest September temperatures ever recorded in the Lower 48, even though SNOTELs aren't considered to be official stations).   
  • -1 at Lower Hewinta SNOTEL (elevation 6500)
  • 2 at Lake Fork #1 SNOTEL (elevation 10,415) on 9/28/1986
  • 4 at Lake Fork Basin SNOTEL (elevation 10,966) on 9/25/1984
  • 6 at Brown Duck SNOTEL (elevation 10,600) on 9/28/1986
  • 7 at Trial Lake SNOTEL (elevation 9992) 
  • 7 at Five Point SNOTEL (elevation 10,940) on 9/18/1996
  • 7 at Peter Sinks on 9/10/2016

 

October

 

-Utahs’s record high for the month is 99 at Zion National Park on 10/4/1999, Hite on 10/2/1953, and at St George on 10/1/1980, 10/2/1963, and 10/4/1917.   All of these values appear to be legitimate.  There was also a reading of 99 at the St George RAWS on 10/2/2010, but the reading may be a few degrees too warm and is not considered to be official. 

NCDC has records listed on 10/1/2010 as 108 at Lytle Ranch and St George, and 103 at La Verkin, but these are very dubious.

 

-Honorable mention:

  • 98 at Lytle Ranch on 10/2/2010
  • 98 at Lytle Ranch on 10/4/2000
  • 98 at Lytle Ranch on 10/1/2010
  • 98 at St George on 10/7/1996
  • 98 at St George on 10/9/1996
  • 98 at St George on 10/10/1996

Note:  There are two readings on 99 at Zion National Park on 10/29/1906 and 10/30/1906, but these seem very dubious.

 

-Utah’s official record low for the month is -16 at Woodruff on 10/31/1972, but once again this has been beaten  at Peter Sinks.  Although an impressive reading, even more impressive were the readings from Central and Southern Utah during the October cold snap of 1971.  This is one of the most impressive out of season cold snaps anywhere.  Even the low elevation desert locations (such as Hanksville) reported sub-zero temperatures. Several of these October records are colder than November and March records. 

 

-Honorable mention:

  • -13 at Antimony on 10/30/1971 (tie with November record low set in 1902 and colder than March record by 10 degrees)
  • -12 at Circleville Utah on 10/30/1971 (colder than November record by 2 degrees and March record by 8 degrees)
  • -12 at Modena on 10/30/1971 (Colder than November record by 5 degrees and March record by 7 degrees)
  • -10 at Panguich on 10/30/1971
  • -9 at Loa on 10/30/1971
  • -8 at Blacks Fork on 10/29/1917
  • -7 at Cedar City on 10/30/1971 (tie with November record low and 6 degrees colder than March record).
  • -6 at Hanksville on 10/30/1971 (10 degrees colder than March record)
  • -6 at Gunnison on 10/30/1971
  • -6 at Koosharem at 10/30/1971
  • -6 at Allen S Ranch on 10/30/1971 (4 degrees colder than March record)
  • -6 at Scofield on 10/22/1908 
  • -6 at Blacks Fork on 10/24/1920

-Utah Sinks and SNOTELS:

 

  • -32 at Peter Sinks on 10/31/2002
  • -21 at Peter Sinks on 10/28/2010
  • -17 at Peter Sinks on 10/27/2010
  • -16 at Lower Hewinta SNOTEL (elevation 6500) on 10/30/1991
  • -16 at Hewinta SNOTEL (elevation 9500) on 10/30/1991
  • -13 at Lake Fork #1 SNOTEL (elevation 10,415) on 10/28/1991
  • -13 at Brown Duck SNOTEL (elevation 10,600)
  • -12 at Peter Sinks on 10/26/2012
  • -11 at Lily Lake SNOTEL (elevation 9050)
  • -9 at Chepeta Lake SNOTEL (elevation 10,300) on 10/29/1991
  • -8 at Five Point SNOTEL (elevation 10,940)
  • -8 at Haystack SNOTEL (elevation 9212)

November

 

-Utahs’s record high for the month is either 90 at Zion National Park on 11/14/1999 or 88 at St George on 11/2/1945.   Online sources and almanacs still list one of the readings at St George as being the record, but the 90 at Zion National Park is in the WRCC database.  Some of the earlier readings (before 1920) at Zion National Park seem dubious. These are marked with an asterisk.   

 

-Honorable mention:

  • 88 at St George on 11/2/1945
  • 87 at Lytle Ranch on 11/14/1999
  • 87 at St George on 11/1/1945
  • 86 at Grouse Creek on 11/4/1966 (dubious)
  • 86 at Zion National Park on 11/5/1915*
  • 86 at Zion National Park on 11/3/1921*
  • 86 at Zion National Park on 11/7/2007
  • 86 at St George on 11/3/1924
  • 85 at Little Sahara on 11/11/1983
  • 85 at Bluff on 11/6/1915
  • 85 at Lytle Ranch on 11/2/1999
  • 85 at Lytle Ranch on 11/3/2001
  • 85 at Lytle Ranch on 11/5/1999
  • 85 at Lytle Ranch on 11/12/1999
  • 85 at Lytle Ranch on 11/13/1999
  • 85 at Zion National Park on 11/1/1910*
  • 85 at Zion National Park on 11/2/1918*
  • 85 at Zion National Park on 11/4/1910*
  • 85 at Zion National Park on 11/8/2006
  • 85 at Zion National Park on 11/6/1934
  • 85 at St George on 11/6/1934

 

-Utah’s official record low for the month is -30 at Woodruff on 11/30/1979, but once again this has been beaten at the Sinks.  

 

-Honorable mention:

  • -28 at Woodruff on 11/29/1979
  • -27 at Woodruff on 11/16/1955
  • -26 at Lewiston on 11/16/1955
  • -26 at Fort Duchene on 11/29/1919
  • -26 at Woodruff on 11/25/1993
  • -26 at Woodruff on 11/28/1979
  • -25 at Woodruff on 11/30/2004
  • -25 at Randolf on 11/26/1993
  • -25 at Scofield on 11/28/1979
  • -25 at Blacks Fork on 11/23/1918
  • -24 at Scipio on 11/20/1977
  • -23 at Scofield on 11/23/1982
  • -23 at Scofield on 11/29/1979
  • -23 at Scipio on 11/26/1918
  • -23 at Woodruff on 11/24/2010

-Utah Sinks and SNOTELS:

  • -52 at Peter Sinks in 11/1998 (maybe dubious?) 
  • -47 at Middle Sink on 11/23/2003
  • -44 at Peter Sinks on 11/16/2014
  • -37 at Peter Sinks on 11/15/2014
  • -36 at Peter Sinks on 11/17/2014
  • -35 at Peter Sinks on 11/21/2015
  • -24 at Lake Fork #1 SNOTEL (elevation 10,415)

December

 

-December is a tough one as far as the record high goes.   Maybe there was too much Christmas eggnog shared among weather observers?   Utah's record high for the month is probably  75 at Zion National Park on 12/5/1939 and at St George on 12/3/1941.

 

In almanacs and online sites, Utah’s official record high for the month is listed as 76 at Rockdale in 1906, supposedly on 12/3/1906.  Rockdale is between La Verkin and Zion National Park, so the reading might be possible sometime in history, but St. George was only 58 that day, so the reading is almost certainly not legitimate.   (The Rockdale reading is sometimes attributed to Zion National Park, but the station was in Rockdale from 1904 to 1907).   No other stations in the state recorded a temperature of 70 that month (St George had a maximum of 66), so the 76 probably isn't legitimate.

 

Zion National Park actually has a few 80 or higher readings in December 1904 and 1910 but these readings are very dubious.  

A reading of 77 at La Verkin on 12/9/2006 was also reported, but doesn't seem to be collaborated in the nearby weather stations.  Unfortunately the St George data for that day is missing.  

 

Vernon, south of Tooele also supposedly recorded a 76 on 12/6/1965, but this reading seems very dubious.  Tooele only reached 45 that day.

 

-Honorable mention:

  • 74 at Zion National Park on 12/1/1995
  • 74 at La Verkin on 12/12/1957
  • 74 at Kanab on 12/10/1950
  • 73 at Richfield on 12/13/1921
  • 73 at La Verkin on 12/3/1980
  • 73 at La Verkin on 12/5/1977
  • 73 at Lytle Ranch on 12/1/1995
  • 73 at St George on 12/5/1977

-Utah’s official record low for the month is -49 at Woodruff on 12/12/1932, but once again this has been beaten at the Sinks.  

 

-Honorable mention:

  • -47 at Woodruff on 12/24/1924
  • -47 at Woodruff on 12/24/1924
  • -46 at Woodruff on 12/31/1978
  • -44 at Woodruff on 12/26/1924
  • -44 at Woodruff on 12/23/1990
  • -44 at Logan 5 SW Experimental Farm on 12/24/1990
  • -44 at Woodruff on 12/19/1924
  • -44 at Woodruff on 12/20/1924
  • -43 at Flowell on 12/23/1990 (a hot desert location in summer)
  • -43 at Logan 5 SW Experimental Farm on 12/23/1990
  • -42 at Woodruff on 12/10/1972
  • -41 at Randolf on 12/23/1990

-Utah Sinks and SNOTELS:

  • -57 at Middle Sink on 12/23/1990
  • -51 at Peter Sinks on 12/31/2014
  • -46 at Peter Sinks on 12/27/2015
  • -45 at Rock Creek SNOTEL (elevation 7900) probably on 12/23/1990
  • -45 at Peter Sinks on 12/30/2014
  • -44 at Peter Sinks on 12/31/2015
  • -44 at Peter Sinks on 12/26/2015
  • -44 at Peter Sinks on 12/19/2012

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#2
wx_statman

Posted 21 October 2016 - 11:01 PM

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Awesome! I'm loving all the info. 



#3
IbrChris

Posted 24 October 2016 - 11:40 AM

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Excited to see the last few months. Nice work here and several records I wasn't aware of. I'm working nights this week and if it's slow I'll put together a report for WA.

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#4
IbrChris

Posted 24 October 2016 - 11:56 AM

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The values for Peter Sinks in the Campbell Scientific era (2010 to present) should be considered fully valid records. The instrumentation on site, including siting, is impeccable. The station was set up and is monitored by the Utah Climate Center in Logan. Pre-2010 readings were done by observers who traveled to the Sinks in instances where records seemed likely and in some cases were taken with sling psychrometers (think Kestrel) and aren't on par with established station values...but are worthy of inclusion in a comprehensive report such as this.

While NWS doesn't consider RAWS to be official data, the siting and instrumentation is usually quite good, however erroneous values can result from instruments breaking, battery issues and overexposure (since the thermistor isn't fan aspirated). I generally trust low temps on RAWS more than high temps, as all RAWS are sited at 2 meters AGL over natural ground cover. High temps can be accurate outside of summer extreme warm values if corroborated by nearby COOP or airport stations.
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#5
IbrChris

Posted 24 October 2016 - 12:02 PM

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Is there some corroborating readings for the Arches NP value of 116 in July 2003? I am aware that summer was a scorcher in Utah. I am just curious how nearby stations like Green River and Canyonlands Airport (Moab) fared during that heat episode. Seems potentially overexposed.

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#6
Scott

Posted 24 October 2016 - 12:40 PM

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 I am just curious how nearby stations like Green River and Canyonlands Airport (Moab) fared during that heat episode.

 

 

I wondered about that too.  

Unfortunately, the Green River weather station stopped operating in 2009.  (Green River's record high is 113 on 7/11/1994.    Surprising to some, the record low there is -42 on 1/22/1937).

 

Other stations in the area did have their record highs at the same time.  The Needles Ranger station, a cooler location than Arches National Park Headquarters hit and all time record of 107 on the 14th and 15th.   Hanksville hit 114 on the 11th, also the all time record high.   Grand Junction set their all time record on the 12th and 13th, but this was broken in 2005, by one degree.  

However, Moab USGS only hit 110 that day (I can't find the data for Canyonlands Airport for that time period), so it is possible that the Arches reading was overexposed.   On the other hand, Hanksville is 300 feet higher than Arches and hit 114, so the Arches reading might be possible, though it would strange that Moab wouldn't be hotter if Arches really was 116.  

 

If the Arches reading isn't accurate, 115 at Zion National Park (elevation 4050) might be the hottest temperature in the nation recorded at over 4000 feet.   Dewey (upriver from Moab and at elevation 4120), Moab (elevation 4020) and Hanksville (elevation 4460), all with 114 (at least twice at Hanksville) would be next.  Even though that region is above 4000 feet, it gets extremely hot in summer and the readings collaborate well with one another.


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Scott

Posted 24 October 2016 - 06:54 PM

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Finished!!  If anyone has some additions or corrections, please let me know.

 

All the cold records for each month seem to be accurate, though I do have question on where exactly the official July reading was taken.   There are questions about the high readings in October, November, and December, so if anyone has any input on this, it is certainly welcomed.  



#8
IbrChris

Posted 24 October 2016 - 10:57 PM

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Some errors on the SNOTEL values (I vetted them using the data tables over at Utah Climate Center) but other than that most everything seems to check out...there's a few values for Peter Sinks in the 2010-2016 timeframe that would qualify as honorable mention.


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#9
IbrChris

Posted 24 October 2016 - 11:02 PM

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Re: High temps for Oct, Nov, Dec

I am inclined to think the Oct record highs are dubious/overexposed. Looking at the St George airport data it was 97 on 10/1/2010 and Las Vegas (McCarran Airport) was 94 on 10/1 and 96 on 10/2. Bunkerville, NV was 101 on both dates.

Highs on 10/1 from nearby stations (highest temp recorded):

  • 102 Beaver Dam, AZ
  • 104 Mesquite 2NE, NV
  • 101 Bunkerville, NV
  • 97 St George Airport (94 at the St George COOP ID: 1080136, 2,857', 93 at St George 15NE at 3,416')
  • 94 Las Vegas McCarran, NV (showers/storms delivered a trace of rain)

In the 10/1/1980 event Phoenix hit it's Oct record of 107 and St George (COOP) reached 99. In my personal records I have 99 at Zion NP on 10/4/1999 as the state record.

Comparing Oct 2010 NCDC Utah state climatological report with Utah Climate Center data (UCC) for Oct 1, 2010:

Lytle Ranch COOP - NCDC: 108, UCC: 98
St George COOP - NCDC: 107, UCC: 94
La Verkin COOP - NCDC: 103, UCC: 93

I think I would tend to believe the UCC values personally...the Oct 1980 event seems warmer across most of the Desert SW.

Lastly, Phoenix has never hit 108 in October (record is 107 in Oct 1980) which seems pretty damning in terms of the chances SW Utah stations could get that warm in early Oct.

 

For November I'm inclined to go with the 88 at St George on 11/2/1945 as the state record but the 90 at Zion NP is plausible...the park seems to get slightly warmer than St George or Lytle Ranch at times in winter, perhaps due to the canyon environment or perhaps due to weak inversions at the lower elevations (yes the desert SW can get wintertime inversions though due to dry boundary layer there's not much in the way of clouds...however smog can get fairly bad in Phoenix during stagnant winter patterns).

 

I agree with the record being 75 in Dec, the 76 at Rockville was recorded on 12/3/1906 and looking at the Dec 1906 climatological publication for Utah there's no other stations in SW Utah that even reached 70 that month...and most of them were warmest on Dec 11th.


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#10
Scott

Posted 25 October 2016 - 06:33 AM

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Re: High temps for Oct, Nov, Dec

I am inclined to think the Oct record highs are dubious/overexposed. Looking at the St George airport data it was 97 on 10/1/2010 and Las Vegas (McCarran Airport) was 94 on 10/1 and 96 on 10/2. Bunkerville, NV was 101 on both dates.

Highs on 10/1 from nearby stations (highest temp recorded):

  • 102 Beaver Dam, AZ
  • 104 Mesquite 2NE, NV
  • 101 Bunkerville, NV
  • 97 St George Airport (94 at the St George COOP ID: 1080136, 2,857', 93 at St George 15NE at 3,416')
  • 94 Las Vegas McCarran, NV (showers/storms delivered a trace of rain)
In the 10/1/1980 event Phoenix hit it's Oct record of 107 and St George (COOP) reached 99. In my personal records I have 99 at Zion NP on 10/4/1999 as the state record.

Comparing Oct 2010 NCDC Utah state climatological report with Utah Climate Center data (UCC) for Oct 1, 2010:

Lytle Ranch COOP - NCDC: 108, UCC: 98
St George COOP - NCDC: 107, UCC: 94
La Verkin COOP - NCDC: 103, UCC: 93

I think I would tend to believe the UCC values personally...the Oct 1980 event seems warmer across most of the Desert SW.
Lastly, Phoenix has never hit 108 in October (record is 107 in Oct 1980) which seems pretty damning in terms of the chances SW Utah stations could get that warm in early Oct.

For November I'm inclined to go with the 88 at St George on 11/2/1945 as the state record but the 90 at Zion NP is plausible...the park seems to get slightly warmer than St George or Lytle Ranch at times in winter, perhaps due to the canyon environment or perhaps due to weak inversions at the lower elevations (yes the desert SW can get wintertime inversions though due to dry boundary layer there's not much in the way of clouds...however smog can get fairly bad in Phoenix during stagnant winter patterns).

I agree with the record being 75 in Dec, the 76 at Rockville was recorded on 12/3/1906 and looking at the Dec 1906 climatological publication for Utah there's no other stations in SW Utah that even reached 70 that month...and most of them were warmest on Dec 11th.

Good to know. I agree with all of the above and made the edits. The five 99 values recorded in October do seem legitimate. I may add some 97 values as more honorable mentions.

Any more thoughts on the 116 at Arches? I added a note saying that it might be questionable.

I also don't know what to think of the 17 in July at Tropic. Loa did hit 19 during that same cold spell, but it is normally a much colder location than Tropic. I just can't see Tropic being 17 in July (Tropic was actually named because those who settled it said that the weather was tropical compared to Panguich, which is over the mountains to the west and which is normally much colder). Because of the Loa reading of 19 during the same cold snap, I am inclined to think that it could hit 17 in the region, but that it was probably somewhere around Bryce Canyon (which didn't exist as a National Park then), rather than Tropic.

The -65 reading at Woodruff on 1/14/1888 is also very interesting. That was a very extreme cold spell, but there weren't many weather stations around to record it. I wonder if it could actually be valid if the reading was taken down by the river? Woodruff does have verified temperatures down to -50. A while ago I sent the information on the -65 to Chris Burt and he thought that it might be possible.

(yes the desert SW can get wintertime inversions though due to dry boundary layer there's not much in the way of clouds


Yes. Hanskville, Green River, Moab (especially Canyonlands Airport), Cisco, and the Lower San Juan River Valley (Aneth, Mexican Hat, and Bluff) are very prone to inversions. St George seems to get spared most of the time, but the valleys north of there (Panguich, Modena, Enterprise, and Pine Valley), are quite prone to inversions.

Hanksville actually gets some extreme inversions at times. During January 1919, for example, the average low was -16.

Some errors on the SNOTEL values (I vetted them using the data tables over at Utah Climate Center) but other than that most everything seems to check out...there's a few values for Peter Sinks in the 2010-2016 timeframe that would qualify as honorable mention.


If you know which ones are errors, let me know and I will update them.


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#11
Black Hole

Posted 25 October 2016 - 09:51 AM

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Very interesting information guys. I love reading this stuff. 


BS Atmospheric Science University of Utah May 2015

PhD Candidate Atmospheric Sciences

 

--Emphasis on: Forecasting, Mountain Weather, Numerical Weather Prediction, Data Assimilation

 

Winter 2016/17 Snow:
Nov 17: 3.2", 23: 1.6", 28: 9.2" (14)

Dec 1: .5", 16: 2.5", 25: 13" (16)

Jan 2: 5", 3: 2.4", 4: 7.7", 12: 1", 19: 1.2", 21: 13", 23: 6", 24: 1", 25: 3.7", 26: 2.5" (43.5) 

Feb 11: .5", 23: 6.5", 27: 4.5" (13.5)

Mar 5: 5.5" (5.5)

Apr 8: 2", 9: 1.8" (3.8)

May 17: 1" (1)
Total: 96.3"

Lowest Temp: 2F


#12
IbrChris

Posted 25 October 2016 - 12:23 PM

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I listed the Arches NP 116 as potentially overexposed but didn't fully dismiss it. I'll check the NCDC reports tonight.

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#13
IbrChris

Posted 25 October 2016 - 12:26 PM

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For Tropic I can dig up Lat/Lon coordinates for the station and its elevation. Then just dump into google maps.

Loa may be the authentic record there.
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#14
IbrChris

Posted 25 October 2016 - 06:14 PM

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Additional notable Peter Sink (Utah Climate Center/Campbell Scientific) values:

-46 on 1/13/2013 and 1/14/2013
-49 on 2/2/2011

-48 on 2/1/2011

-46 on 2/22/2010

-40 on 3/25/2013

-37 on 3/1/2012

-35 on 3/24/2013

-34 on 3/5/2013

-31 on 3/12/2014

-26 on 4/7/2010

-23 on 4/14/2013

-22 on 4/13/2013

-19 on 4/2/2014 and 4/3/2014

-18 on 4/17/2013

-16 on 4/4/2014

-13 on 5/7/2010

-8 on 5/1/2011

-5 on 5/2/2011

-3 on 5/5/2010

10 on 6/17/2011

12 on 6/10/2011

17 on 7/12/2016

17 on 7/28/2015 and 7/30/2015

14 on 8/4/2016

17 on 8/24/2016

18 on 8/27/2016

18 on 8/25/2012

7 on 9/10/2016

-21 on 10/28/2010

-17 on 10/27/2010

-12 on 10/26/2012

-44 on 11/16/2014

-37 on 11/29/2015

-37 on 11/15/2014

-36 on 11/17/2014

-35 on 11/21/2015

-51 on 12/31/2014

-46 on 12/27/2015

-45 on 12/30/2014

-44 on 12/31/2015

-44 on 12/26/2015

-44 on 12/19/2012


SNOTEL values w/ dates:

-20 at Lake Fork #1 on 4/13/1997
-16 at Hewinta (9,500') on 4/12/1997
-15 at Lake Fork Basin on 4/11/1997
-14 at Five Point Lake on 4/12/1997
-12 at Brown Duck on 4/13/1997

-11 at Chepeta (10,300') on 4/13/1997
-5 at Lake Fork Basin on 5/11/1999
-4 at Hewinta (6,500') on 5/1/2011
-4 at Lake Fork #1 on 5/1/1990
-3 at Five Point Lake on 5/11/1999
-2 at Hewinta (9,500') on 5/1/2011
0 at Brown Duck on 5/11/1999
0 at Chepeta (10,300') on 5/11/1999
1 at Blacks Fork Jct on 5/2/2013
1 at Trial Lake on 5/11/1999
2 at Chepeta (12,120') on 5/1/2008
11 at Lake Fork #1 on 6/10/2002
12 at Chepeta (10,300') on 6/2/1990
12 at Five Point Lake on 6/9/1995
13 at Chepeta (12,120') on 6/10/2012
15 at Hewinta (9,500') on 6/13/2001
17 at Hewinta (6,500') on 8/26/1992
-3 at Lake Fork Basin on 9/30/1986 (lows were upper teens on 9/30/1985)
-1 at Hewinta (6,500') on 9/25/1984
2 at Lake Fork #1 on 9/28/1986
4 at Lake Fork Basin on 9/25/1984
6 at Brown Duck on 9/28/1986
7 at Five Point Lake on 9/18/1996
-16 at Hewinta (both 6,500' and 9,500' stations) on 10/30/1991

-13 at Lake Fork #1 on 10/28/1991

-9 at Chepeta (10,590') on 10/29/1991

I'm sure there's dates for the others you have listed, though some seem errors when consulting the Utah Climate Center data (difference perhaps due to QC?)


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#15
IbrChris

Posted 25 October 2016 - 06:20 PM

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Tropic, UT station
ID: USC00428847
Latitude: 37.6258
Longitude: -112.081
Elevation: 6279.86 ft

Period of Record 1893-1999

Just punched the coordinates into Google Maps...it's located in the NE corner of Tropic, within the town proper.

Another station in the vicinity with limited data:

Tropic 9 SE
ID: USW00003081
Latitude: 37.5175
Longitude: -111.978
Elevation: 5895.01 ft

Period of Record 2009-2014


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#16
Scott

Posted 25 October 2016 - 06:30 PM

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SNOTEL values w/ dates:

 

 

 

Thanks.  I'll update them.

 

The 3 on 6/10/2002 at Soldier Summit is another one looking into.    Soldier Summit does get cold in June and Utah did have a cold snap on the 10th (Salt Lake dropped to 36, the coldest June reading since 1962), but the value almost seems a little too cold.



#17
IbrChris

Posted 25 October 2016 - 06:34 PM

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July 1-7, 1902 at Tropic:

85/42

76/35

76/17

72/24

74/19

80/19

83/25

Some wild swings there!

Monthly average 86.3/38.1

Looking at NCDC report for July 1902...definitely some cold temps in south-central UT early in the month:

Coyote (Garfield Co.) 23 on 7/4
Loa (Wayne Co.) 19 on 7/2
Marysvale (Piute Co.) 29 on 7/3
Minersville (Beaver Co.) 36 on 7/3 (Sevier Desert)
Modena (Iron Co.) 31 on 7/3
Plateau (Sevier Co.) 30 on 7/3
Richfield (Sevier Co.) 32 on 7/2
Parowan (Iron Co.) 29 on 7/3
Ranch (Kane Co.) 25 on 7/3
St George (Washington Co.) 41 on 7/3 (this is a remarkable reading for Utah's Dixie in July!)

Seems like there's a good chance it's legitimate...at the very least I'd say plausible. Siting is the biggest issue with these old records...often the shelter was not sited to 6 ft (2 meter) specifications and was closer to an observer's chest or head height resulting in lower readings than a 2 meter observation.


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#18
IbrChris

Posted 25 October 2016 - 06:46 PM

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Thanks.  I'll update them.

 

The 3 on 6/10/2002 at Soldier Summit is another one looking into.    Soldier Summit does get cold in June and Utah did have a cold snap on the 10th (Salt Lake dropped to 36, the coldest June reading since 1962), but the value almost seems a little too cold.

 

6/10/2002 was definitely a cold morning in the central UT mountains up through the Wasatch Back.

16 at Electric Lake
17 at Currant Creek SNOTEL (8,000')
18 at Randolph
19 at Coalville 13 E and Trial Lake SNOTEL (9,992')
21 at Woodruff, Park City and Scofield
22 at Daniels-Strawberry

23 at White River #1 SNOTEL (8,641') closest station to Soldier Summit
24 at Wanship Dam

Does seem a little on the cold side at Soldier Summit however. The Utah Climate Center data is spotty for June 2002 at Soldier Summit but it shows a low of only 29 on 6/10, coldest low during the month is 16 on 6/12 and 6/13. The UCC data seems suspect. Seems like they QC'd out the really low values.

The COOP data from the 6/2002 NCDC report shows the following for Soldier Summit from June 1-15, 2002:

81/31

69/21

66/20

65/14

60/20

65/21

81/30

79/32

60/30

63/3

60/11

66/16

79/16

80/20

82/19

Utah Climate Center data for the same 15 days:

81/31

69/31

M/30

65/31

60/20
65/31

69/30

65/M
60/30

63/29

70/25

80/16

79/16

80/20

82/19

Seems like the value may be dubious...but I highly doubt the UCC data is more accurate. It's a known cold spot as well, so I'm hesitant to completely dismiss the value, but it seems unrealistically cold compared to readings at other stations in the region that night.


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#19
Scott

Posted 25 October 2016 - 07:49 PM

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Tropic, UT station
ID: USC00428847
Latitude: 37.6258
Longitude: -112.081
Elevation: 6279.86 ft

Period of Record 1893-1999

Just punched the coordinates into Google Maps...it's located in the NE corner of Tropic, within the town proper.

Another station in the vicinity with limited data:

Tropic 9 SE
ID: USW00003081
Latitude: 37.5175
Longitude: -111.978
Elevation: 5895.01 ft

Period of Record 2009-2014

 

The NWS Cooperative Network says that the station was moved three times between 1948 and 1999 (same ID number), but gives no station coordinates or elevation are given before that before that.  The elevation changed slightly as well (6240 to 6310 feet for each of the four locations between 1948 and 1999).  The location doesn't seem to have moved that much, so probably wouldn't make a difference.

 

Either way, a 17 reading in July in Tropic seems incredible, almost too hard to believe.   I assumed that reading either must be an error or was taken somewhere else and wrongly attributed to Tropic, but I dug up some more information.

 

 

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

(Note, I was writing this at the same time that Chris was also writing his post, and posted it before I saw his post, so some information below is redundant).  

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

Here's what I dug up:

 

Unfortunately, there weren't that many weather stations in the area during that time period.   I can find only three and all of them had some really cold readings then.

 

23 (or 18, see below) at Antimony (average July low = 45.5)

19 at Loa (average July low = 46.7)

17 at Tropic (average July low = 50.8)

 

Tropic probably did get very cold on that day (at least for July!), but on average is actually the warmest location of the three reporting station during that time period.  One glitch though, daily low records for Antimony report a 18 during the same cold snap, but listed in 1901.   The reading might be correct (and is collaborated by the other surrounding sites), but should be  attributed to 1902, rather than 1901.   (I missed the Antimony reading in the initial post).

 

Further afield, the other stations that existed at the time (1902) in the same general region, but that aren't that close did report some very cold out of season lows.   All of these were in warmer locations though.

 

Parowan, which has never had another freeze in July (and still doesn't have one for August) recorded a 29.  St George recorded a 41 (it hasn't dropped to even 50 in St George since 1932).  Deseret recorded their only July frost on record.  Castle Dale recorded a 29, the only time it has ever frozen in July there.  Richfield also froze, one of only two frost ever to occur in July there.  Manti also had it's only July frost then.  Scipio hit 31, the 2nd coldest July temperature.

 

Unfortunately, the above are all the stations I can dig up for the region that were operating in 1902.

 

I guess the Tropic reading, even if incredible, might be legitimate.  


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#20
Scott

Posted 25 October 2016 - 08:13 PM

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Additional notable Peter Sink (Utah Climate Center/Campbell Scientific) values:

 

I'm sure there's dates for the others you have listed, though some seem errors when consulting the Utah Climate Center data (difference perhaps due to QC?)

 

 

That's some really great information.  Thanks for doing that.  For the SNOTELs, I actually went through all the information by hand for each day to obtain the records and averages (in the library before 2001 and on the internet after that).  It was quite a project.  They were listed as preliminary only and may or may not have been QC'd yet.   Also, they were all in Celsius, so I had to convert them.   That is the reason why some are a degree off from your values.

 

Anyway, I started gathering that information for a book I was writing on the Uinta Mountains (though I only used a little of the info).   I was a backpacking guide up there for a few years and when I wasn't visited the mountains on a very frequent basis.  

Those basins up there are really subject to radiation cooling, thus I was able to obtain the two 15 degree readings in July and two 18 degree readings in August (I likely would have obtained lower readings for August, but the season when I was a backpacking guide ended in mid August and after that college started in late August).  When I look at the weather data, none of the days I recorded those temperatures on were unusually cold at the closest weather stations, so during cold snaps, it must get incredibly cold in those basins.  


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#21
wx_statman

Posted 25 October 2016 - 08:39 PM

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Excited to see the last few months. Nice work here and several records I wasn't aware of. I'm working nights this week and if it's slow I'll put together a report for WA.

 

Nice. I actually began preliminary work on a WA summary of extremes back in 2009, shortly after I completed my OR summary. But other things came up and I lost interest. That laptop ended up crashing on me the following year, so I lost all my data for both OR and WA. Good thing we have Microsoft's OneDrive now.  :lol:



#22
wx_statman

Posted 25 October 2016 - 08:54 PM

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The NWS Cooperative Network says that the station was moved three times between 1948 and 1999 (same ID number), but gives no station coordinates or elevation are given before that before that.  The elevation changed slightly as well (6240 to 6310 feet for each of the four locations between 1948 and 1999).  The location doesn't seem to have moved that much, so probably wouldn't make a difference.

 

Either way, a 17 reading in July in Tropic seems incredible, almost too hard to believe.   I assumed that reading either must be an error or was taken somewhere else and wrongly attributed to Tropic, but I dug up some more information.

 

 

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

(Note, I was writing this at the same time that Chris was also writing his post, and posted it before I saw his post, so some information below is redundant).  

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

Here's what I dug up:

 

Unfortunately, there weren't that many weather stations in the area during that time period.   I can find only three and all of them had some really cold readings then.

 

23 (or 18, see below) at Antimony (average July low = 45.5)

19 at Loa (average July low = 46.7)

17 at Tropic (average July low = 50.8)

 

Tropic probably did get very cold on that day (at least for July!), but on average is actually the warmest location of the three reporting station during that time period.  One glitch though, daily low records for Antimony report a 18 during the same cold snap, but listed in 1901.   The reading might be correct (and is collaborated by the other surrounding sites), but should be  attributed to 1902, rather than 1901.   (I missed the Antimony reading in the initial post).

 

Further afield, the other stations that existed at the time (1902) in the same general region, but that aren't that close did report some very cold out of season lows.   All of these were in warmer locations though.

 

Parowan, which has never had another freeze in July (and still doesn't have one for August) recorded a 29.  St George recorded a 41 (it hasn't dropped to even 50 in St George since 1932).  Deseret recorded their only July frost on record.  Castle Dale recorded a 29, the only time it has ever frozen in July there.  Richfield also froze, one of only two frost ever to occur in July there.  Manti also had it's only July frost then.  Scipio hit 31, the 2nd coldest July temperature.

 

Unfortunately, the above are all the stations I can dig up for the region that were operating in 1902.

 

I guess the Tropic reading, even if incredible, might be legitimate.  

 

FWIW, there was also a major cold trough in the Western US in early July 1901, in addition to 1902. 


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#23
Scott

Posted 25 October 2016 - 09:06 PM

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FWIW, there was also a major cold trough in the Western US in early July 1901, in addition to 1902. 

 

 

Yes.  In Southern Utah though, 1902 seemed to be much colder in all locations, unless the reading for Antimony really was recorded in 1901 (which I guess is also possible, though nearby Loa was only 41 on that day in 1901 [it was 29 on the 4th though]).  Antimony readings for both 1901 and 1902 would be worth checking into.  



#24
wx_statman

Posted 25 October 2016 - 09:07 PM

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The early July 1902 cold trough was incredible in the West. Downtown Portland had three straight highs of 58 to start the month, along with 1.01" of rain on the 2nd. Summit Guard Station on Mt. Hood, which is the location of present day Government Camp, recorded 4.0" of snow. The modern Government Camp station has never recorded measurable snowfall in July, with a period of record dating to 1951. More impressively, early July 1902 appears to be the only instance of measurable snowfall in Nevada in the month of July, at least in populated places. I'm not aware of any other occurrences, but I'm not 100% sure on this statistic.  

 

5.0" in Eureka (6,500') on 7/2/1902

4.4" in Wells (5,600') on 7/4/1902


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#25
wx_statman

Posted 25 October 2016 - 09:11 PM

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Yes.  In Southern Utah though, 1902 seemed to be much colder in all locations, unless the reading for Antimony really was recorded in 1901 (which I guess is also possible).  Antimony readings for both 1901 and 1902 would be worth checking into.  

 

I can't vouch for the Antimony readings one way or another. I don't know enough information on my end. 

 

I do know that downtown Portland hit 45 on 7/4/1901, which is an impressively cold reading even in that era. Downtown Portland was already developing a UHI by that time. 


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#26
wx_statman

Posted 25 October 2016 - 09:27 PM

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I checked some of the hotter RAWS sites in southern Utah. 

 

In addition to 118 on 7/4/2007, it looks like the St. George RAWS site hit 99 on 10/2/2010, 101 on 4/22 & 4/23/2012, and 117 on 6/29 & 6/30/2013. All of these readings are in direct competition with "official" values that we have here as possible monthly state records. 

 

Zion Canyon RAWS hit an incredible 98 on 10/21/2003 (PHX had a late season record high of 103 on this date).


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#27
Scott

Posted 25 October 2016 - 09:54 PM

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More impressively, early July 1902 appears to be the only instance of measurable snowfall in Nevada in the month of July, at least in populated places. I'm not aware of any other occurrences, but I'm not 100% sure on this statistic.  

 

5.0" in Eureka (6,500') on 7/2/1902

4.4" in Wells (5,600') on 7/4/1902

 

 

That's amazing.   I would bet that you are right about it being the only occurrence in a populated place.  It occasionally does snow on Wheeler Peak in July, and on some other high mountains as well, but I doubt it has snowed in July on other occasions at the elevations of Eureka and Wells.

 

Jarbidge (Nevada), at 6170 feet once had measurable snow in August, but it was only half and inch and not nearly as impressive as those other readings.  



#28
Scott

Posted 25 October 2016 - 09:58 PM

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In addition to 118 on 7/4/2007, it looks like the St. George RAWS site hit 99 on 10/2/2010, 101 on 4/22 & 4/23/2012, and 117 on 6/29 & 6/30/2013. All of these readings are in direct competition with "official" values that we have here as possible monthly state records. 

 

Zion Canyon RAWS hit an incredible 98 on 10/21/2003 (PHX had a late season record high of 103 on this date).

 

 

Great info.   The Zion Canyon RAWS reading was probably over exposed as none of the official stations in the region even reached 90.   St George hit 88.

I'll add those St George RAWS readings into the unofficial ones.



#29
IbrChris

Posted 25 October 2016 - 09:59 PM

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Judging by readings of 18 at Randolph and 21 at Woodruff on 7/3/1902 I'm betting it's one of those extremely rare cases where Peter Sinks could have seen a low near zero...or even a couple degrees below...in July! Unfortunately we'll never know. There's no reliable correlation between temps at Logan or Randolph and temps in the sinks as the sinks rely on a localized cold pool effect requiring calm winds in the overnight hours to allow decoupling.
 

Aug 25, 1910 was another likely candidate for sub-zero reading at Peter Sinks...Chesterfield, ID about 70 miles NNW saw a low of 11.


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#30
IbrChris

Posted 25 October 2016 - 10:03 PM

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I checked some of the hotter RAWS sites in southern Utah. 

 

In addition to 118 on 7/4/2007, it looks like the St. George RAWS site hit 99 on 10/2/2010, 101 on 4/22 & 4/23/2012, and 117 on 6/29 & 6/30/2013. All of these readings are in direct competition with "official" values that we have here as possible monthly state records. 

 

Zion Canyon RAWS hit an incredible 98 on 10/21/2003 (PHX had a late season record high of 103 on this date).

And on another non-Utah note, the 86 at Red Mound RAWS on 1/15/2009 and the 86 at Wheeler Creek RAWS on 2/25/1992 seem to be the Oregon record highs for those months, assuming we include RAWS. There's corroborating information for both events.


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#31
Scott

Posted 25 October 2016 - 10:06 PM

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Judging by readings of 18 at Randolph and 21 at Woodruff on 7/3/1902 I'm betting it's one of those extremely rare cases where Peter Sinks could have seen a low near zero...or even a couple degrees below...in July! Unfortunately we'll never know. There's no reliable correlation between temps at Logan or Randolph and temps in the sinks as the sinks rely on a localized cold pool effect requiring calm winds in the overnight hours to allow decoupling.

 

That would be interesting.   I wonder what the readings at Peter Sinks were in the cold snaps in such times as January 1888, February 1899, or February 1933 could have been?   If the -65 at Woodruff in January 1888 really did happen, I wonder what it could have been at Peter Sinks.  It would have been off the charts.

 

And on another non-Utah note, the 86 at Red Mound RAWS on 1/15/2009 

 

 

86 in January in Oregon would be incredible!  



#32
wx_statman

Posted 25 October 2016 - 10:14 PM

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Great info.   The Zion Canyon RAWS reading was probably over exposed as none of the official stations in the region even reached 90.   St George hit 88.

I'll add those St George RAWS readings into the unofficial ones.

 

Interesting. I didn't do any vetting on my end, but yeah that sounds over-exposed to me too. 



#33
wx_statman

Posted 25 October 2016 - 10:19 PM

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And on another non-Utah note, the 86 at Red Mound RAWS on 1/15/2009 and the 86 at Wheeler Creek RAWS on 2/25/1992 seem to be the Oregon record highs for those months, assuming we include RAWS. There's corroborating information for both events.

 

I definitely consider those to be legitimate readings, just not official. I actually have those readings listed in my lead-off post to the "Some RAWS Records for Oregon" thread, from November 2014:

 

http://theweatherfor...oregon/?p=37647



#34
IbrChris

Posted 25 October 2016 - 10:20 PM

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I checked some of the hotter RAWS sites in southern Utah. 

 

In addition to 118 on 7/4/2007, it looks like the St. George RAWS site hit 99 on 10/2/2010, 101 on 4/22 & 4/23/2012, and 117 on 6/29 & 6/30/2013. All of these readings are in direct competition with "official" values that we have here as possible monthly state records. 

 

Zion Canyon RAWS hit an incredible 98 on 10/21/2003 (PHX had a late season record high of 103 on this date).

Not sure I'd trust all these values...June 2013 only reached 110 at St George on 6/30...the highest temp in the state was 114 at Zion NP on 6/29 and 6/30.

In July 2007 the warmest location was La Verkin with 113 on 7/5. St George saw 112 on 7/6/2007.

In Oct 2003 Zion NP COOP station did record 96 on 10/21/2003, which seems to potentially validate the RAWS value. St George was 88 that day and La Verkin 92.

Even though as I recall the 118 at St George RAWS in July 2007 was touted as a new state record (I recall mention of it at the University of Utah as I was a student there at the time) I am not so sure it's accurate...it's easy to get readings that are several degrees too warm with RAWS since they don't have a fan.

In April 2012 the top COOP reading was 97 at Zion NP and Lytle Ranch on 4/23. St George reached 95.


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#35
IbrChris

Posted 25 October 2016 - 10:22 PM

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That would be interesting.   I wonder what the readings at Peter Sinks were in the cold snaps in such times as January 1888, February 1899, or February 1933 could have been?   If the -65 at Woodruff in January 1888 really did happen, I wonder what it could have been at Peter Sinks.  It would have been off the charts.

 

 

86 in January in Oregon would be incredible!  

Computer modelling suggests the Sinks could get as cold as -82 to -84 for a 2-meter temperature in an ideal situation, which if ever recorded and certified as true would be the new North American record.


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#36
wx_statman

Posted 25 October 2016 - 10:25 PM

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Not sure I'd trust all these values...June 2013 only reached 110 at St George on 6/30...the highest temp in the state was 114 at Zion NP on 6/29 and 6/30.

In July 2007 the warmest location was La Verkin with 113 on 7/5. St George saw 112 on 7/6/2007.

In Oct 2003 Zion NP COOP station did record 96 on 10/21/2003, which seems to potentially validate the RAWS value. St George was 88 that day and La Verkin 92.

Even though as I recall the 118 at St George RAWS in July 2007 was touted as a new state record (I recall mention of it at the University of Utah as I was a student there at the time) I am not so sure it's accurate...it's easy to get readings that are several degrees too warm with RAWS since they don't have a fan.

In April 2012 the top COOP reading was 97 at Zion NP and Lytle Ranch on 4/23. St George reached 95.

 

That's the thing. Sort of makes me question a lot of the RAWS readings from heat waves. They're interesting to look at, but they most likely wouldn't pass QC.

 

That's one of the reasons I usually stick to official values, like I did in my OR summary of extremes.  



#37
IbrChris

Posted 25 October 2016 - 10:36 PM

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That's the thing. Sort of makes me question a lot of the RAWS readings from heat waves. They're interesting to look at, but they most likely wouldn't pass QC.

 

That's one of the reasons I usually stick to official values, like I did in my OR summary of extremes.  

Yeah...I bet that is why NCDC doesn't view them as official yet. This issue doesn't affect low temperatures however.

If you take a typical Davis VantagePro and compare fan-aspirated vs no fan there's generally a 1-2 F warm bias on high temps on sunny and fairly calm days year-round. A light breeze if consistent negates the issue. I suspect with the RAWS at St George we're seeing something like a +2 F warm bias on those readings.


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#38
wx_statman

Posted 25 October 2016 - 10:38 PM

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Yeah...I bet that is why NCDC doesn't view them as official yet. This issue doesn't affect low temperatures however.

If you take a typical Davis VantagePro and compare fan-aspirated vs no fan there's generally a 1-2 F warm bias on high temps on sunny and fairly calm days year-round. A light breeze if consistent negates the issue. I suspect with the RAWS at St George we're seeing something like a +2 F warm bias on those readings.

 

Sounds reasonable. I agree that low temperature readings at RAWS sites are probably reliable. 



#39
Jesse

Posted 25 October 2016 - 11:01 PM

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Didn't January 1934 hit low 80s at Fremont Rim or thereabouts?

#40
wx_statman

Posted 25 October 2016 - 11:22 PM

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Didn't January 1934 hit low 80s at Fremont Rim or thereabouts?

 

82 on 1/31/1934 is on the books @ Fremont. 

 

Its a bogus reading as far as I'm concerned. I couldn't find any reasonable corroboration for it when I researched it. 



#41
Scott

Posted 26 October 2016 - 06:43 AM

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82 on 1/31/1934 is on the books @ Fremont. 

 

Its a bogus reading as far as I'm concerned. I couldn't find any reasonable corroboration for it when I researched it. 

 

It is definitely not legitimate.   The real record high for that day (1/31) is 58 in 1971.

 

In July 2007 the warmest location was La Verkin with 113 on 7/5. St George saw 112 on 7/6/2007.

 

 

Zion National Park was also 112 on 7/4/2007.   I was there that day!



#42
Scott

Posted 26 October 2016 - 12:00 PM

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Judging by readings of 18 at Randolph and 21 at Woodruff on 7/3/1902 I'm betting it's one of those extremely rare cases where Peter Sinks could have seen a low near zero...or even a couple degrees below...in July! Unfortunately we'll never know. There's no reliable correlation between temps at Logan or Randolph and temps in the sinks as the sinks rely on a localized cold pool effect requiring calm winds in the overnight hours to allow decoupling.
 

Aug 25, 1910 was another likely candidate for sub-zero reading at Peter Sinks...Chesterfield, ID about 70 miles NNW saw a low of 11.

 

More recently, possibly 1992 as well?  Unfortunately, it seems that no one bothered to take a reading at Peter Sinks during that cold snap.   This is the same cold snap that produced impressive snowfalls in Montana and Wyoming.   Even Cedar City, not that far from St George received measurable snowfall!    Randolf hit 17 and Sage hit 15 on 8/26/1992.   Peter Sinks was able to a record a 6 on 8/31/2005, and since 1992 was colder in the region than 2005, it is possible that temperatures at Peters Sink may have approached or even reached 0.   There really haven't been any real July or August cold snaps in the region since then.  


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#43
wx_statman

Posted 26 October 2016 - 12:50 PM

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It is definitely not legitimate.   The real record high for that day (1/31) is 58 in 1971.

 

Zion National Park was also 112 on 7/4/2007.   I was there that day!

 

Its hard to say what is and what isn't a real record these days, since so many records are missing from the WRCC database due to the QC'ing disaster in the NCEI database, which is where both the Utah Climate Center and the WRCC pull their numbers from. Lots of records are missing right now, both warm and cold. Specifically for Fremont, yeah there's no way they reached 82 on 1/31/1934, so its probably a good thing that record got QC'd out (it still appears in the monthly record table for Fremont, since those tables haven't been updated since 2012). But many legitimate records have been QC'd out as well, which creates a real problem when trying to determine what the "real" records are at any given station on any given date.

 

This brings me to another point - right now is not a very good time to be researching past weather extremes. With so much missing data we don't know what records we're not including. Its also much more difficult to cross-check readings right now for that very reason. A particular record might appear bogus because there are no corroborating readings in the WRCC database, but what if there actually had been several corroborating readings at other stations, but they happened to get QC'd out (due to their extreme nature) and are thus no longer visible? 

 

Its a real mess right now.



#44
IbrChris

Posted 26 October 2016 - 05:44 PM

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Its hard to say what is and what isn't a real record these days, since so many records are missing from the WRCC database due to the QC'ing disaster in the NCEI database, which is where both the Utah Climate Center and the WRCC pull their numbers from. Lots of records are missing right now, both warm and cold. Specifically for Fremont, yeah there's no way they reached 82 on 1/31/1934, so its probably a good thing that record got QC'd out (it still appears in the monthly record table for Fremont, since those tables haven't been updated since 2012). But many legitimate records have been QC'd out as well, which creates a real problem when trying to determine what the "real" records are at any given station on any given date.

 

This brings me to another point - right now is not a very good time to be researching past weather extremes. With so much missing data we don't know what records we're not including. Its also much more difficult to cross-check readings right now for that very reason. A particular record might appear bogus because there are no corroborating readings in the WRCC database, but what if there actually had been several corroborating readings at other stations, but they happened to get QC'd out (due to their extreme nature) and are thus no longer visible? 

 

Its a real mess right now.

I suggest checking the printed monthly reports for each month over at NCDC...those don't change. They're PDFs of photocopies.

I agree with you though...it's much harder nowadays to vet the data.


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#45
Scott

Posted 26 October 2016 - 06:07 PM

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NOW Data on NOAA makes a good cross check too.  They don't have every single station (especially ones no longer in operation), but they do have a pretty comprehensive database for each day.  



#46
Scott

Posted 26 October 2016 - 07:59 PM

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I updated the original post with the SNOTEL corrections and additional Peter Sinks values.  I also separated the Peter Sinks and SNOTEL sites from the readings at official weather stations.

 

Of note, I also found a lower record for May at an official station.   Comparing it to the other nearby stations during that time period, it appears legitimate, though the date reported may be one day off.   

 

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

PS Chris, Chris Burt posted the following chart in a thread:

 

sinktemps.jpg

 

I noticed that you posted a similar chart.   Do you know anything about the supposed -52 value recorded in November 1998?   It seems dubious to me since November 1998 was a very mild month in the region.  It is also the only Peter (or Middle) Sinks value that I can't find a date for.  



#47
wx_statman

Posted 27 October 2016 - 12:08 PM

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I suggest checking the printed monthly reports for each month over at NCDC...those don't change. They're PDFs of photocopies.

I agree with you though...it's much harder nowadays to vet the data.

 

Yeah, the monthly reports are a tremendous resource. 

 

I wonder why the NCDC restricted the Daily Summary Observations search feature? As recently as two years ago you could search daily data across whatever spatial grid of your choice, for any given calendar date back to 1900. Made for cross-checking individual events very easy. Now that feature is only available back to 2006. 



#48
IbrChris

Posted 27 October 2016 - 07:04 PM

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Yeah, the monthly reports are a tremendous resource. 

 

I wonder why the NCDC restricted the Daily Summary Observations search feature? As recently as two years ago you could search daily data across whatever spatial grid of your choice, for any given calendar date back to 1900. Made for cross-checking individual events very easy. Now that feature is only available back to 2006. 

Sounds like some data-scrubbing going on behind the scenes...and they wonder why catastrophic AGW is laughed off by anyone who knows anything about the science (besides those who have an agenda).


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#49
Scott

Posted 05 May 2017 - 12:42 PM

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I believe I found a lower July record for Utah (excluding the Sinks of course).   Blacks Fork was 16 on 7/3/1921.   This seems to be a credible reading because other stations in the region during the cold snap also reported very low readings.  

 

I also added several honorable mention reading from Blacks Fork to several other months.   Minus Peters Sink and other nearby sinks, and the SNOTELS in the High Uintas Wilderness area, Blacks Fork seems to be one of the coldest places in Utah that ever had a weather station.  Unfortunately, the weather station only lasted 4/1/1916 to 9/30/1921.

 

I also added the two -50's recorded at Peter Sinks this last January.



#50
wx_statman

Posted 05 May 2017 - 01:36 PM

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I believe I found a lower July record for Utah (excluding the Sinks of course).   Blacks Fork was 16 on 7/3/1921.   This seems to be a credible reading because other stations in the region during the cold snap also reported very low readings.  

 

I also added several honorable mention reading from Blacks Fork to several other months.   Minus Peters Sink and other nearby sinks, and the SNOTELS in the High Uintas Wilderness area, Blacks Fork seems to be one of the coldest places in Utah that ever had a weather station.  Unfortunately, the weather station only lasted 4/1/1916 to 9/30/1921.

 

I also added the two -50's recorded at Peter Sinks this last January.

 

That's a good find. I noticed you added the -18 in Blacks Fork on 4/4/1918. I can't vouch for the siting of the Blacks Fork station, but that was definitely an impressive cold snap for April. There was measurable snow in places along the I-5 corridor and widespread lows in the 20's, i.e. 23 in Centralia and 25 in Albany on the 3rd. 

 

Speaking of early January 2017, that was a very impressive cold snap in the Intermountain west region during the first week of the month. IIRC Baker City had its coldest weather since December 1990 with a max of 1 and a low of -24. Laramie 2NW, WY, hit -41 on the 5th which was second only to -43 on 1/1/1979 (POR 1966-). You might know about the Hohnholz Ranch reading in CO on the 6th, when they hit -48. The POR only goes back to 12/1/1985 at this station (missing the big cold wave earlier that year), but this broke the all-time record by 6 degrees, previously -42 on 2/2/2011. In Utah, Randolph hit -39, which was within 4 degrees of the all-time record (-43 on 2/1/1985).