Jump to content

Welcome to our forums!

Sign In or Register to gain full access to our forums. By registering with us, you'll be able to discuss, share and private message with other members of our community.

Welcome!

Thanks for stopping by the Weather Forums! Please take the time to register and join our community. Feel free to post or start new topics on anything related to the weather or the climate.


Photo

2017 ENSO Discussion

- - - - -

  • Please log in to reply

#301
westMJim

Posted 15 October 2017 - 01:45 PM

westMJim

    Forum Contributor

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 792 posts
  • LocationGrand Rapids, mi

In what ways?!

The summer and fall of 1917/18 were cold, in fact the whole year of 1917 was cold that year had the coldest mean temperature in Grand Rapids


  • jaster220 likes this

#302
Niko

Posted 15 October 2017 - 01:48 PM

Niko

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3923 posts
  • LocationMacomb, MI

The summer and fall of 1917/18 were cold, in fact the whole year of 1917 was cold that year had the coldest mean temperature in Grand Rapids

Wow....So, I would imagine no Summer at all was experienced that year.

 

Do you have info on how that Winter turned out?



#303
OKwx2k4

Posted 16 October 2017 - 12:29 AM

OKwx2k4

    Daily Contributor

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2282 posts
Of note, when discussing 1917-18, much of the cooler summer was explained by volcanism if I'm not mistaken.

@Niko, the winter of 1917-18 bore a large resemblance to 2000 or 2013 in my opinion. One of the reasons that 1917-18 gets my attention is reading the descriptions of SST and weather patterns over the Bering Sea during that era.

For reference Google "The 'Old-fashioned' Winter of 1917-18". Also of note, I believe the fact that they called it old-fashioned (in its own era) also leads to believe that there was an oddly long era of warm winters with maybe 3-4 brutally cold ones interspersed over a near 30 year period there. Largely different from what folks would really believe based on today's data.
  • Niko and jaster220 like this

#304
westMJim

Posted 16 October 2017 - 05:43 AM

westMJim

    Forum Contributor

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 792 posts
  • LocationGrand Rapids, mi

Wow....So, I would imagine no Summer at all was experienced that year.

 

Do you have info on how that Winter turned out?

This is the original post I made on the winter of 1917/17

I did a little research on January 1917.  First off 1917 was much colder that average and the year is the coldest mean for the whole year at GRR with a mean of 44.6°  Now for January 1918 I do not know how much snow Marshall or Jackson received but according to the official records at Grand Rapids and other locations  the snows in early mid-January 1918 came is two storms one on January 6th and 7th and then the one on January 11th and 12th Here are some totals from the two storms Grand Rapids Jan 6th 11” Jan 7th 2” Jan 12th 10” Jan 13th 2” total on the ground 22” Lansing Jan 6th 5” Jan 7th 1.5” Jan 11th 2” Jan 12th 4.8” total on the ground 15” Detroit Jan 6th 2” Jan 11th 1.3” Jan 12th 3.7” no report of total on the ground. Saginaw Jan 6th 5.8” Jan 11th 6.8” Jan 12 1.2” total on the ground 16” All Michigan locations reported lows on the 12th of -14° or -15° Fort Wane Jan 1st (yes the 1st) 5.7” Jan 7th 4.0” Jan 11th 4.2” total on the ground 19” coldest low on the 12th -24° Chicago Jan 6th 14.4” Jan 7th 0.5” Jan 11th 5.9” Jan 12th 4.0” total on the ground 25” coldest low -14° January 1918 was a cold and snowy month in the great lakes area. At Grand Rapids the mean for the month was 18.4° (-11.9°) and 45” of snow was reported. I hope this gives you a good idea as to how the winter of 1917/18 turned out but as I said the summer fall leading into it were much different than this year. 

And later Niko had a reply

In what ways?!

And my reply to that was

The summer and fall of 1917/18 were cold, in fact the whole year of 1917 was cold that year had the coldest mean temperature in Grand Rapids

I hope this helps clear that up.


  • Niko likes this

#305
Niko

Posted 16 October 2017 - 05:45 AM

Niko

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3923 posts
  • LocationMacomb, MI

Of note, when discussing 1917-18, much of the cooler summer was explained by volcanism if I'm not mistaken.

@Niko, the winter of 1917-18 bore a large resemblance to 2000 or 2013 in my opinion. One of the reasons that 1917-18 gets my attention is reading the descriptions of SST and weather patterns over the Bering Sea during that era.

For reference Google "The 'Old-fashioned' Winter of 1917-18". Also of note, I believe the fact that they called it old-fashioned (in its own era) also leads to believe that there was an oddly long era of warm winters with maybe 3-4 brutally cold ones interspersed over a near 30 year period there. Largely different from what folks would really believe based on today's data.

Thanks for the info....... :)



#306
Niko

Posted 16 October 2017 - 05:46 AM

Niko

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3923 posts
  • LocationMacomb, MI

This is the original post I made on the winter of 1917/17

I did a little research on January 1917.  First off 1917 was much colder that average and the year is the coldest mean for the whole year at GRR with a mean of 44.6°  Now for January 1918 I do not know how much snow Marshall or Jackson received but according to the official records at Grand Rapids and other locations  the snows in early mid-January 1918 came is two storms one on January 6th and 7th and then the one on January 11th and 12th Here are some totals from the two storms Grand Rapids Jan 6th 11” Jan 7th 2” Jan 12th 10” Jan 13th 2” total on the ground 22” Lansing Jan 6th 5” Jan 7th 1.5” Jan 11th 2” Jan 12th 4.8” total on the ground 15” Detroit Jan 6th 2” Jan 11th 1.3” Jan 12th 3.7” no report of total on the ground. Saginaw Jan 6th 5.8” Jan 11th 6.8” Jan 12 1.2” total on the ground 16” All Michigan locations reported lows on the 12th of -14° or -15° Fort Wane Jan 1st (yes the 1st) 5.7” Jan 7th 4.0” Jan 11th 4.2” total on the ground 19” coldest low on the 12th -24° Chicago Jan 6th 14.4” Jan 7th 0.5” Jan 11th 5.9” Jan 12th 4.0” total on the ground 25” coldest low -14° January 1918 was a cold and snowy month in the great lakes area. At Grand Rapids the mean for the month was 18.4° (-11.9°) and 45” of snow was reported. I hope this gives you a good idea as to how the winter of 1917/18 turned out but as I said the summer fall leading into it were much different than this year. 

And later Niko had a reply

In what ways?!

And my reply to that was

The summer and fall of 1917/18 were cold, in fact the whole year of 1917 was cold that year had the coldest mean temperature in Grand Rapids

I hope this helps clear that up.

Interesting. Thanks! :)



#307
westMJim

Posted 16 October 2017 - 05:46 AM

westMJim

    Forum Contributor

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 792 posts
  • LocationGrand Rapids, mi

Of note, when discussing 1917-18, much of the cooler summer was explained by volcanism if I'm not mistaken.

@Niko, the winter of 1917-18 bore a large resemblance to 2000 or 2013 in my opinion. One of the reasons that 1917-18 gets my attention is reading the descriptions of SST and weather patterns over the Bering Sea during that era.

For reference Google "The 'Old-fashioned' Winter of 1917-18". Also of note, I believe the fact that they called it old-fashioned (in its own era) also leads to believe that there was an oddly long era of warm winters with maybe 3-4 brutally cold ones interspersed over a near 30 year period there. Largely different from what folks would really believe based on today's data.

Yes there was some volcanic activity before 1917, not sure how much of a inpact it had on the weather of 1917/18 here is some info on that,

 

 

 

“2015 marks the 100th anniversary of the May 22, 1915 explosive volcanic eruption of Lassen Peak in northern California. The eruption forever altered an already dynamic landscape and led to the creation of a national park, which serves as a place of discovery for curious visitors, and a living laboratory for many scientific disciplines. A century after the Lassen eruptions, work by U.S. Geological Survey scientists — in cooperation with the National Park Service — is shedding new light on these events.  USGS and Lassen Volcanic National Park are commemorating the centennial with several events in 2015.

The total volume of the 1915 eruptions was tiny compared to a major eruption like that of Mount St. Helens in 1980. The deposits from the Lassen Peak eruptions are rapidly becoming obscured by vegetation and erosion, and the small size and unconsolidated nature of the thin deposits make the 1915 eruptions unlikely to be preserved in the long-term geologic record. Today, Lassen Peak sleeps again, but active steam vents, hot springs, and bubbling mudpots are still found elsewhere in Lassen Volcanic National Park.”

Here is the complete article

 

https://www.usgs.gov...l-commemoration


  • Niko and jaster220 like this

#308
Niko

Posted 16 October 2017 - 06:00 AM

Niko

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3923 posts
  • LocationMacomb, MI

Yes there was some volcanic activity before 1917, not sure how much of a inpact it had on the weather of 1917/18 here is some info on that,

 

 

 

“2015 marks the 100th anniversary of the May 22, 1915 explosive volcanic eruption of Lassen Peak in northern California. The eruption forever altered an already dynamic landscape and led to the creation of a national park, which serves as a place of discovery for curious visitors, and a living laboratory for many scientific disciplines. A century after the Lassen eruptions, work by U.S. Geological Survey scientists — in cooperation with the National Park Service — is shedding new light on these events.  USGS and Lassen Volcanic National Park are commemorating the centennial with several events in 2015.

The total volume of the 1915 eruptions was tiny compared to a major eruption like that of Mount St. Helens in 1980. The deposits from the Lassen Peak eruptions are rapidly becoming obscured by vegetation and erosion, and the small size and unconsolidated nature of the thin deposits make the 1915 eruptions unlikely to be preserved in the long-term geologic record. Today, Lassen Peak sleeps again, but active steam vents, hot springs, and bubbling mudpots are still found elsewhere in Lassen Volcanic National Park.”

Here is the complete article

 

https://www.usgs.gov...l-commemoration

For some reason, volcanoes affect the atmosphere in terms of precipitation and temps. Perhaps, the small ash particles and the aerosol clouds in the air help to cool down the temps.

 

I found this article:

 

https://www.scientif...anoes-affect-w/


  • jaster220 likes this

#309
jaster220

Posted 16 October 2017 - 07:12 AM

jaster220

    St. Joseph Lighthouse Jan '14

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3951 posts
  • LocationKRMY (Marshall, MI) KBEH (work)
"Yes there was some volcanic activity before 1917, not sure how much of a inpact it had on the weather of 1917/18 here is some info on that"


Well, we often cite Mount Saint Helen as a contributor to the brutal winter of 81-82, so there may be some connection with an eruption in our part of the globe. First I've heard of this 1915 volcano tbh.
  • Niko likes this

#310
jaster220

Posted 17 October 2017 - 06:39 PM

jaster220

    St. Joseph Lighthouse Jan '14

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3951 posts
  • LocationKRMY (Marshall, MI) KBEH (work)
Snagged this off Amwx from a nice post by one of the LOT Met's looking at Nina November's:

"In a prior post, Hoosier posted stats for warm La Nina Novembers and what the winters ended up doing. For the research for our local winter outlook at NWS Chicago, I did something similar. First I grouped all winters of the 1950-2017 ONI from the CPC page into warmest 22, middle 23 and coldest 22 at Chicago. Then I grouped the Niña episodes of those terciles into warm (9), near normal (6) and cold (6). Here are the November h5 composites, November climate division temperature anomalies, and subsequent DJF h5 composite anomalies.

From these graphics, it appears there will be utility in how the mid/upper pattern sets up in November to potentially give clues to the winter pattern. If a big northeast Pacific/AK vortex sets up, that could increase odds for warmer to well above normal winter, and perhaps within range of normal to below if sustained Aleutian (-WPO) or -EPO ridging sets up."



An avg Nov turns out ok as well, but we really want a cold Nov to elevate our expectations of something special going forward.
  • Niko and Tom like this

#311
OKwx2k4

Posted 20 October 2017 - 01:26 AM

OKwx2k4

    Daily Contributor

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2282 posts

Snagged this off Amwx from a nice post by one of the LOT Met's looking at Nina November's:

"In a prior post, Hoosier posted stats for warm La Nina Novembers and what the winters ended up doing. For the research for our local winter outlook at NWS Chicago, I did something similar. First I grouped all winters of the 1950-2017 ONI from the CPC page into warmest 22, middle 23 and coldest 22 at Chicago. Then I grouped the Niña episodes of those terciles into warm (9), near normal (6) and cold (6). Here are the November h5 composites, November climate division temperature anomalies, and subsequent DJF h5 composite anomalies.

From these graphics, it appears there will be utility in how the mid/upper pattern sets up in November to potentially give clues to the winter pattern. If a big northeast Pacific/AK vortex sets up, that could increase odds for warmer to well above normal winter, and perhaps within range of normal to below if sustained Aleutian (-WPO) or -EPO ridging sets up."

imageproxy (1).jpg

An avg Nov turns out ok as well, but we really want a cold Nov to elevate our expectations of something special going forward.


I believe this is spot on.
  • jaster220 likes this

#312
Niko

Posted 24 October 2017 - 06:34 PM

Niko

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3923 posts
  • LocationMacomb, MI
Update prepared by:
Climate Prediction Center / NCEP
23 October 2017
 
ENSO: Recent Evolution,
Current Status and Predictions

 

 
ENSO Alert System Status: La Niña Watch:
 
Neutral conditions are present.
Equatorial sea surface temperatures (SSTs) are near to below average across
the central and eastern Pacific Ocean.
La Niña conditions are favored (~55%65%) during the Northern Hemisphere fall
and winter 2017 18.*


#313
Tom

Posted 30 October 2017 - 06:24 AM

Tom

    Community Mod

  • Mods
  • 14995 posts
  • LocationDes Plaines, IL

CPC's subsurface depth anomalies are showing that the warmer surface waters in the eastern equatorial regions have all but eroded away...

 

wkxzteq_anm.gif



#314
jaster220

Posted 30 October 2017 - 06:53 AM

jaster220

    St. Joseph Lighthouse Jan '14

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3951 posts
  • LocationKRMY (Marshall, MI) KBEH (work)

CPC's subsurface depth anomalies are showing that the warmer surface waters in the eastern equatorial regions have all but eroded away...

 

wkxzteq_anm.gif

 

Nice, as long as the cold anomalies don't over-run the surface too much, we'll get a mostly neutral scenario this winter I feel. NMME shows borderline Nina/Nada, going only slightly more negative, nothing drastic. Just enough to get the jet (moisture) response we desire.. ;)

 

 

Actually, I see the NMME was dated the 9th, so here's CPC's from their weekly released today, the 30th. Region 3.4 riding the Nada/Nina line!

 

 


  • Tom likes this

#315
daniel1

Posted 30 October 2017 - 10:19 AM

daniel1

    Forum Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 26 posts
So the La Niña is east based yet we continue to see this eastern ridge from hell keep showing up.

#316
jaster220

Posted 30 October 2017 - 10:42 AM

jaster220

    St. Joseph Lighthouse Jan '14

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3951 posts
  • LocationKRMY (Marshall, MI) KBEH (work)

So the La Niña is east based yet we continue to see this eastern ridge from hell keep showing up.

 

SE ridge is proto-typical Nina pattern. There's a good chance it get's beat-down as we head into and thru winter, but until then it will rear it's head whenever it's able. Also, it's not an official Nina, and even if it was, there's a correlated lag period (not sure what that is tbh) between SST's and atmospheric response, similar to that seen during a SWE. Tom or anyone more knowledgeable can chime in if I'm missing the mark with any of this..



#317
jaster220

Posted 31 October 2017 - 05:37 AM

jaster220

    St. Joseph Lighthouse Jan '14

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3951 posts
  • LocationKRMY (Marshall, MI) KBEH (work)

SE ridge is proto-typical Nina pattern. There's a good chance it get's beat-down as we head into and thru winter, but until then it will rear it's head whenever it's able. Also, it's not an official Nina, and even if it was, there's a correlated lag period (not sure what that is tbh) between SST's and atmospheric response, similar to that seen during a SWE. Tom or anyone more knowledgeable can chime in if I'm missing the mark with any of this..

 

As a follow-up to my own post I found some information that was compiled on East-based vs Central-based Nina. The article is here: 

https://link.springe...1434-012-5423-5

 

While not yet an official Nina by longevity, we can clearly see that whatever level it reaches (or doesn't) that it would be East-based, not central. That alone is a good thing per analogs for our upcoming winter. It's also known that the winter starts off on the warm side with Dec being chilly in the north only, not further south, as I mentioned. The cold begins to intensify after the winter solstice so it's not typically a front-loaded season at all. 

 

East-based 500 mb (JFM)

 

 

East-based Temp anom's (JFM)

 

 

And by contrast, Central-based Nina temps:

 

 

Certainly with this, and a -QBO plus a relatively calm solar situation, there's a LOT of signals for cold after we get thru autumn. Not that it's really hot outside right now.. :lol:


  • Tom and westMJim like this

#318
OKwx2k4

Posted 31 October 2017 - 10:03 AM

OKwx2k4

    Daily Contributor

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2282 posts

As a follow-up to my own post I found some information that was compiled on East-based vs Central-based Nina. The article is here:
https://link.springe...1434-012-5423-5

While not yet an official Nina by longevity, we can clearly see that whatever level it reaches (or doesn't) that it would be East-based, not central. That alone is a good thing per analogs for our upcoming winter. It's also known that the winter starts off on the warm side with Dec being chilly in the north only, not further south, as I mentioned. The cold begins to intensify after the winter solstice so it's not typically a front-loaded season at all.

East-based 500 mb (JFM)

20171031 East Nina JFM 500 mb pattern.jpg

East-based Temp anom's (JFM)

20171031 East Nina JFM temps.jpg

And by contrast, Central-based Nina temps:

20171031 Central Nina JFM temps.jpg

Certainly with this, and a -QBO plus a relatively calm solar situation, there's a LOT of signals for cold after we get thru autumn. Not that it's really hot outside right now.. :lol:


Good stuff.

#319
Tom

Posted 09 November 2017 - 07:58 AM

Tom

    Community Mod

  • Mods
  • 14995 posts
  • LocationDes Plaines, IL

CPC suggesting a 65-75% chance that weak La Nina conditions shall continue through DFM period...

 

http://www.cpc.ncep..../ensodisc.shtml



#320
jaster220

Posted 09 November 2017 - 09:28 AM

jaster220

    St. Joseph Lighthouse Jan '14

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3951 posts
  • LocationKRMY (Marshall, MI) KBEH (work)

CPC suggesting a 65-75% chance that weak La Nina conditions shall continue through DFM period...

 

http://www.cpc.ncep..../ensodisc.shtml

 

Saw a blurb yesterday (BAM?) that the Nina has recently relaxed in R1.2 to where it's almost averaging out as neutral, which I'm fine with personally. ;)



#321
OKwx2k4

Posted 09 November 2017 - 11:30 PM

OKwx2k4

    Daily Contributor

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2282 posts

Saw a blurb yesterday (BAM?) that the Nina has recently relaxed in R1.2 to where it's almost averaging out as neutral, which I'm fine with personally. ;)


Yes. If the Nina will gradually drift West over the next 3 months it will be absolutely perfect.
  • jaster220 likes this

#322
Tom

Posted 14 November 2017 - 06:24 AM

Tom

    Community Mod

  • Mods
  • 14995 posts
  • LocationDes Plaines, IL

My call was ENSO 3.4 region to bottom out around -1.2 during the heart of winter.  Latest Euro run more bullish with the Nina...which has been the trend over the last several months.  It'll be close, but a moderate Nina is probably not happening, however, reaching moderate intensity during the DFM period is on the table.  

 

 

ps2png-atls13-a82bacafb5c306db76464bc7e8

 

 

 

I did some digging, and the winter of 1995-96 was rated a moderate strength Nina (-0.9C).  Technically, this should we categorized as a weak Nina but for the sake of comparison, let's just roll with it.  See link

 

 

Climate models are predicting a similar strength ENSO event for this winter.  Ironically, look at how cold Nov '95 was and compare it to this year thus far.

 

 

 


  • jaster220 and LNK_Weather like this

#323
jaster220

Posted 14 November 2017 - 07:01 AM

jaster220

    St. Joseph Lighthouse Jan '14

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3951 posts
  • LocationKRMY (Marshall, MI) KBEH (work)

Difference being the stunning temp gradient this year. A better scenario imho.

 



#324
OKwx2k4

Posted 28 November 2017 - 02:03 AM

OKwx2k4

    Daily Contributor

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2282 posts
This is one of the best SST maps I've honestly ever seen from where I stand. I have never seen more features that argue for a lengthy cold winter in my life.

Attached File  cdas-sflux_ssta_global_1(2).png   126.51KB   0 downloads
  • Tom, jaster220 and Thunder98 like this

#325
Tom

Posted 18 December 2017 - 05:36 AM

Tom

    Community Mod

  • Mods
  • 14995 posts
  • LocationDes Plaines, IL
ENSO 3.4 region may have peaked at a low very close to my call of -1.2C which happened earlier this month.

Attached Files

  • Attached File  1.png   37.46KB   0 downloads

  • jaster220 likes this

#326
Tom

Posted 05 January 2018 - 06:20 AM

Tom

    Community Mod

  • Mods
  • 14995 posts
  • LocationDes Plaines, IL

Impressive La Nina forcing ongoing is setting new lows in the ENSO 3.4 region...

Attached Files

  • Attached File  1.png   36.92KB   0 downloads


#327
jaster220

Posted 05 January 2018 - 09:26 AM

jaster220

    St. Joseph Lighthouse Jan '14

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3951 posts
  • LocationKRMY (Marshall, MI) KBEH (work)

Impressive La Nina forcing ongoing is setting new lows in the ENSO 3.4 region...

 

Other than rollercoaster temps, are we going to see the much anticipated moisture facet of a Nina tho? Sure would be nice..


  • Niko likes this

Winter 2017-18 Snow Total = 34.7"  Oct: 0.0 Nov: 0.0 Dec: 24.2 Jan: 10.5 Feb: 0.0 Mar: 0.0 Apr: 0.0 (annual avg for mby = ~49.9", avg for last 10 seasons = 67.4" ) 135% of normal-what a stretch it's been!!

 

Winter 2015-16 Snow Total = 52"

Winter 2015-16 Snow Total = 57.4"

Winter 2014-15 Snow Total = 55.3"

Winter 2013-14 Snow Total = 100.6" (coldest & snowiest in the modern record!) 

Winter 2012-13 Snow Total = 47.2"

Winter 2011-12 Snow Total = 43.7"

 

Notable Blizzards/Snowstorms in SWMI: Nov 2015, Feb 2015, Jan 2014Feb 2011, Dec 2000, Jan 1999, Mar 1998, Jan 1982, Jan 1979, Jan 1978, Jan 1977, March 1973, Jan 1967, March 1947, Jan 1918

 

"Long range winter forecasting - it's like tossing darts in a hurricane.."  "In my day, they didn't name 'em, they just called 'em blizzards! *Shakes fist in air and ambles away mumbling to himself" and to think kids nowadays get day's off school because the wind blew. I think in '78 we only got 1 day off”  "..It's the U.P. where there are two seasons. Winter, and three months of bad skiing.."


#328
Hawkeye

Posted 11 January 2018 - 11:55 AM

Hawkeye

    Forum Contributor

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 825 posts
  • LocationCedar Rapids, IA

That's a very solid La Nina.  The 3.4 region is now at -1.5.

 

cdas-sflux_ssta_global_1.png


  • Tom and jaster220 like this

season snowfall: 10.8"

 

'16-17: 17.9"      '15-16: 20.0"      '14-15: 30.4"      '13-14: 48.3"      '12-13: 34.1"

 

Average snowfall: ~30"


#329
OKwx2k4

Posted 12 January 2018 - 12:41 AM

OKwx2k4

    Daily Contributor

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2282 posts

That's a very solid La Nina. The 3.4 region is now at -1.5.

cdas-sflux_ssta_global_1.png


Very nice.