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2017 NW sports and outdoor recreation thread

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#1
MossMan

Posted 29 January 2017 - 05:28 PM

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Anything sports and outdoor fun related, no politics allowed! (Unless it's sports politics)
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#2
TT-SEA

Posted 30 January 2017 - 06:44 AM

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We went skiing on Saturday... great conditions. Interesting though how the fog and low clouds come right up to Snoqualmie Pass during an inversion with an east wind. But just one mile to the west and as soon as you start to descend on the west side it turns perfectly clear. Remained that way the entire day... although the fog was quite thin by afternoon. And the top of the chair lifts were above the inversion in certain areas.

This is a different day last week... but here is an example.

16178910_10154906872013349_2463386734579

No doubt that persistent inversions are the main reason why the Summit at Snoqualmie can be a thriving ski area at 3,000 feet.
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#3
epiceast

Posted 30 January 2017 - 11:37 AM

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We went skiing on Saturday... great conditions. Interesting though how the fog and low clouds come right up to Snoqualmie Pass during an inversion with an east wind. But just one mile to the west and as soon as you start to descend on the west side it turns perfectly clear. Remained that way the entire day... although the fog was quite thin by afternoon. And the top of the chair lifts were above the inversion in certain areas.

This is a different day last week... but here is an example.

16178910_10154906872013349_2463386734579

No doubt that persistent inversions are the main reason why the Summit at Snoqualmie can be a thriving ski area at 3,000 feet.

The average snow level without pass effect is at 4k'. Snoqualmie gets the most benefit from it. I think in some global warming scenario sSnoqualmie might even be commercially viable for a little longer than Stevens(more precipitation+stronger pass effect).


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#4
IbrChris

Posted 28 February 2017 - 12:32 PM

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The average snow level without pass effect is at 4k'. Snoqualmie gets the most benefit from it. I think in some global warming scenario sSnoqualmie might even be commercially viable for a little longer than Stevens(more precipitation+stronger pass effect).

I think the effect of climate change on mean snow level in the Cascades is likely exaggerated. I expect both Stevens and Snoqualmie will be commercially viable in 2050 but there may be more of a feast and famine cycle where many winters either overperform (like this one) or underperform. The fact that the dominant snow pattern for both locations is onshore flow and the thermal inertia of the Pacific (airmasses arrive already moderated by the over-water trajectory) means that the Cascades resorts will out-live most in the central and southern Rockies at moderate base elevations (6,000-8,000').


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The Pacific Northwest: Where storms go to die.


#5
Mr Marine Layer

Posted 28 February 2017 - 04:43 PM

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What about SW sports like the Lakers?

#6
epiceast

Posted 28 February 2017 - 04:52 PM

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I think the effect of climate change on mean snow level in the Cascades is likely exaggerated. I expect both Stevens and Snoqualmie will be commercially viable in 2050 but there may be more of a feast and famine cycle where many winters either overperform (like this one) or underperform. The fact that the dominant snow pattern for both locations is onshore flow and the thermal inertia of the Pacific (airmasses arrive already moderated by the over-water trajectory) means that the Cascades resorts will out-live most in the central and southern Rockies at moderate base elevations (6,000-8,000').

Yes, but a large minority of it is fed by easterly winds below 5 or 6k', while its raining at Baker/Crystal. I expect Crystal or white pass be the first areas to close, and Baker after them because of lack of east winds. Especially with the winters getting more blocky, east wind will be more important than ever.



#7
Sounder

Posted 28 February 2017 - 06:08 PM

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I think the effect of climate change on mean snow level in the Cascades is likely exaggerated. I expect both Stevens and Snoqualmie will be commercially viable in 2050 but there may be more of a feast and famine cycle where many winters either overperform (like this one) or underperform. The fact that the dominant snow pattern for both locations is onshore flow and the thermal inertia of the Pacific (airmasses arrive already moderated by the over-water trajectory) means that the Cascades resorts will out-live most in the central and southern Rockies at moderate base elevations (6,000-8,000').

Snowmaking equipment (as is common in California) will also likely significantly lengthen the commercially viable lifespan of these resorts, even with a massive increase in temperatures and decrease in snowfall. In California some of the resorts are lucky to dip below freezing a majority of the nights in a week, but they are able to take advantage of those few hours overnight to produce usable snow even when none actually falls. Most Southern California resorts are usually open before those in the PNW just because they are able to make use of cold, dry fall nights to be productive, while we depend on actual snowfall up here.

 

It sucks for a rider, man made snow is a lot less fun obviously, but it's better than nothing I suppose.


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#8
FroYoBro

Posted 01 March 2017 - 10:08 AM

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What about SW sports like the Lakers?

 

Of course that is ok. Even though they are an evil and terrible team.