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Days Per Year of 90°> Where You Live

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#1
happ

Posted 06 April 2017 - 05:50 AM

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I posted this map on a California weather blog. Since it received good interest, I decided to post it here also. If one hates hot weather than you know where to avoid.   

Attached Files


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#2
iFred

Posted 06 April 2017 - 06:23 AM

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I see Peter's Sink is represented on this map.



#3
happ

Posted 06 April 2017 - 06:28 AM

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Some have raised issue that the map is too broad-brush [ie. higher mt peaks in SoCal never record 90°].



#4
Jesse

Posted 06 April 2017 - 07:04 AM

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I see Peter's Sink is represented on this map.


Not just Peter's Sink but the Uintah Range on the whole.
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#5
Phil

Posted 06 April 2017 - 11:36 AM

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What baseline average is being used? We've typically averaged between 35-45/yr over the last 30yrs, but lately we've been running closer to 45-55/yr. Bleh.
Personal Weather Station, Live Stream on Wunderground: https://www.wundergr...BETHE62#history

Cold season 2017/18:
Snowfall: 0"
Largest snowfall: 0"
Number of winter events: 0
Coldest High 67*F
Coldest low: 44*F
Highest sustained wind: 17mph
Highest wind gust: 26mph

#6
Jesse

Posted 06 April 2017 - 12:10 PM

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I posted this map on a California weather blog. Since it received good interest, I decided to post it here also. If one hates hot weather than you know where to avoid.


Interesting map. Thank you for posting!

I love the blue patches in NW Washington. The warm season climate really changes rapidly moving north from Portland.

#7
WeatherArchive

Posted 06 April 2017 - 06:15 PM

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Reminds me of the snow day map posted on Reedit about how much snow is needed to close schools across the US based on news accounts/comments.etc (doesn't account for cold weather days)

 

This is pretty much the same thing except instead of closing school it shows how much 90F days for where you live. :)   Looks like I fall into the slightest green zone.



#8
Mr Marine Layer

Posted 06 April 2017 - 08:31 PM

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I would say between 10 and 25 days in my area. It would be nice to see a more detailed map of California.



#9
Dan the Weatherman

Posted 06 April 2017 - 09:13 PM

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Some have raised issue that the map is too broad-brush [ie. higher mt peaks in SoCal never record 90°].

 

It also shows the immediate southern California coast having 25-50 days of 90 degree+ weather, which is simply not true, but it is true a few miles inland.



#10
Jesse

Posted 06 April 2017 - 09:26 PM

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It also shows the immediate southern California coast having 25-50 days of 90 degree+ weather, which is simply not true, but it is true a few miles inland.


If you squint really hard you can almost see a line of green along the coast.

#11
happ

Posted 07 April 2017 - 10:19 AM

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I counted 69 days of 90° or higher for 2016. I am around 20 miles inland from the ocean



#12
Front Ranger

Posted 07 April 2017 - 11:15 AM

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Colorado's dominance when it comes to high mountain peaks is clear.

Cool anomalies soothe the soul.


#13
happ

Posted 07 April 2017 - 11:47 AM

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Colorado's dominance when it comes to high mountain peaks is clear.

 

That's interesting since higher elevation/ latitude consistent pks in Cascades/ Sierra are missing. There should be dots to denote. Rockies face the Great Plains/ exposed to Arctic air.   



#14
Phil

Posted 07 April 2017 - 12:29 PM

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It's not the highest resolution map, so it misses the more microclimatic stuff. Snowshoe's record high is 85F. They've never come close to 90F.
Personal Weather Station, Live Stream on Wunderground: https://www.wundergr...BETHE62#history

Cold season 2017/18:
Snowfall: 0"
Largest snowfall: 0"
Number of winter events: 0
Coldest High 67*F
Coldest low: 44*F
Highest sustained wind: 17mph
Highest wind gust: 26mph

#15
Front Ranger

Posted 07 April 2017 - 12:33 PM

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That's interesting since higher elevation/ latitude consistent pks in Cascades/ Sierra are missing. There should be dots to denote. Rookies face the Great Plains/ exposed to Arctic air.


Sure, but no other state has as much area with 10k+ elevation as CO. It's not close. Which is why it shows up more on that map, resolution issues aside.

Cool anomalies soothe the soul.


#16
happ

Posted 07 April 2017 - 12:34 PM

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Sure, but no other state has as much area with 10k+ elevation as CO. It's not close. Which is why it shows up more on that map, resolution issues aside.

 

Yes



#17
Phil

Posted 08 April 2017 - 03:29 PM

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I wonder if this map might be more accurate. Seems to constrain the numbers better.

Keep in mind, this doesn't include temperatures of 100F+

196EF79E-591F-4F37-9A39-D14B103387A8_zps
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Personal Weather Station, Live Stream on Wunderground: https://www.wundergr...BETHE62#history

Cold season 2017/18:
Snowfall: 0"
Largest snowfall: 0"
Number of winter events: 0
Coldest High 67*F
Coldest low: 44*F
Highest sustained wind: 17mph
Highest wind gust: 26mph

#18
Scott

Posted 09 April 2017 - 09:32 PM

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We average 18 days above 90 here (which is actually quite remarkable given our winter temperatures), but the nice thing about that is when it is above 90 in the day, it's usually in the 30's and 40's at night.   Only on cloudy days will we see nights above 50 and on cloudy days we won't hit 90.

 

30's to 90's are common in one day here, and I have seen it go from 32F to 97F in a day.

 

On the chart below is one day in July a few years ago where the official high was 97F and the official low was 37F.  I actually recorded 32F at the house though since nights are a little colder away from town, but afternoons usually have the same temperatures.  

 

This is the chart from Wunderground displaying the hourly temperatures at the official weather station.   The 1st column is the actual temperature, the second column is the dewpoint, and the third the humidity.  Luckily we have really low humidities when it is hot outside.  Also notice how quickly the temperature rises when the sun comes up and how quickly it falls when the sun goes down.  On clear and dry days the temperature can go from the 30's to 90's in only a few hours.

 

997070.JPG

 

I wonder if this map might be more accurate. Seems to constrain the numbers better.

Keep in mind, this doesn't include temperatures of 100F+

 

 

It seems pretty good, but still seems "smoothed out too much".  For example, for Utah, SW Utah should actually have the most 90F temperatures in the state.  The map seems to leave out some mountain areas such as the Cascades and much of the Sierra Nevada where it never hits 90 (where the highest portion of the Sierra Nevada is, the map says it hits 90  70.0 ot 80 days!).  Back east, a bigger portion of the Appalachians should also be without 90F temperatures.

 

It's still a good map though.    It's also nice to see the map have a gray dot of 90's in Alaska!   It does hit 90 occasionally, especially in the interior.  


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#19
Phil

Posted 09 April 2017 - 10:30 PM

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Geesh, that's downright ridiculous..32F to 97F? Can't imagine experiencing that kind of diurnal whiplash.

To the contrary, we struggle to cool at night during the summer with the dewpoints. Sometimes we'll fail to drop below 85F, and spike right back up into the mid/upper 90s by 8AM or so the next day. In the worst scenarios, we'll manage maybe 6hrs per day with temperatures below 90F, with the remaining 18hrs sitting in the 90s w/ higher heat indices. It's enough to drive someone into the loony bin.
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Personal Weather Station, Live Stream on Wunderground: https://www.wundergr...BETHE62#history

Cold season 2017/18:
Snowfall: 0"
Largest snowfall: 0"
Number of winter events: 0
Coldest High 67*F
Coldest low: 44*F
Highest sustained wind: 17mph
Highest wind gust: 26mph

#20
Scott

Posted 09 April 2017 - 11:30 PM

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Geesh, that's downright ridiculous..32F to 97F? Can't imagine experiencing that kind of diurnal whiplash.

To the contrary, we struggle to cool at night during the summer with the dewpoints. 

 

 

Yes, that's one good thing about living here.   On 90 degree days we almost always drop into the 30's and 40's.   Some years we have a lot of 30's to 90's days, but some years we see less.   Occasionally, it goes from the 20's to lower 90's.  June 26 2012, for example, went from 26 to 91.

 

Last year the summer was milder as far as 30's go.  Still, when you look at July, although only one day went from the 30's to 90's, the rest of the 90 degree days were in the 40's, with the exception of July 16, when it was 51.   All other 90 degree days were in the 30's and 40's.  (Of note though, the weather station is in town, but the outlying areas have similar daytime temperatures, but are typically 3-6 degrees colder at night.   Just outside town there was a lot more 30's than in the table below).

 

997077.JPG

You can easily tell the cloudy nights/days from the clear ones just by looking at the temperatures in the table.   The cloudy days have daily diurnal temperature changes of 19 (very unusual for July!) to 35 degrees, while the clear days and nights have diurnal changes in the 40 to 55 degree range.   Changes of more than 60 degrees in a day only happen occasionally.

 

We have big temperature changes in the other seasons too.   The biggest diurnal change I have seen around here was 8 to 80 once in October, a change of 72 degrees (to be fair though,that was when I was working at the river and the cold air pools at the river), though at the official weather station the change was "only" 63 degrees.    Last January, the temperature rose almost 86 degrees in two days.  The change wasn't quite as much at the official weather station since it didn't get quite as cold there, but it did change an impressive 80 degrees from -37 to 43.

 

Temperature wise, we have really interesting weather, but we don't have any severe weather unless you count blizzards and extreme cold (-61 was recorded in Maybell, the next town just west of us).


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#21
IbrChris

Posted 11 April 2017 - 10:05 AM

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For PDX the average is 12-13 days using the 1981-2010 period. A day or two more for HIO.

For SEA it's about 3 days

For a few cities around the PNW average days >= 90 for 1981-2010:

Bellingham <1
Hoquiam 1
Olympia 6
Quillayute <1
Seattle (Sea-Tac) 3
Spokane 20
Walla Walla 44
Wenatchee 33
Yakima 32

Astoria 0
Baker 24
Burns 23

Eugene 14
Klamath Falls 14
Medford 55
North Bend <1
Pendleton 34
Portland 12
Redmond 27
Salem 16
 


The Pacific Northwest: Where storms go to die.


#22
Scott

Posted 13 April 2017 - 04:38 PM

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For a few cities around the PNW average days >= 90 for 1981-2010:

 

 

For the curious, I would guess that Ontario with 67 days might be the greatest amount in Oregon and Smyma with 52 days might be the greatest in Washington (?).


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#23
happ

Posted 14 April 2017 - 11:31 AM

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Some of the low desert communities come close to 200 days a year. The average is 192 days in Death Valley.



#24
Black Hole

Posted 14 April 2017 - 11:35 AM

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I think the map Phil posted is somewhat more accurate, but it has its drawbacks too. Lots of single station bullets on there that don't seem to match the background.


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BS Atmospheric Science University of Utah May 2015

PhD Candidate Atmospheric Sciences

 

--Emphasis on: Forecasting, Mountain Weather, Numerical Weather Prediction, Data Assimilation

 

Winter 2017/2018

Dec 4: 3.2"

 

 

Winter 2016/17 Snow:
Nov 17: 3.2", 23: 1.6", 28: 9.2" (14)

Dec 1: .5", 16: 2.5", 25: 13" (16)

Jan 2: 5", 3: 2.4", 4: 7.7", 12: 1", 19: 1.2", 21: 13", 23: 6", 24: 1", 25: 3.7", 26: 2.5" (43.5) 

Feb 11: .5", 23: 6.5", 27: 4.5" (13.5)

Mar 5: 5.5" (5.5)

Apr 8: 2", 9: 1.8" (3.8)

May 17: 1" (1)
Total: 96.3"

Lowest Temp: 2F


#25
Jesse

Posted 14 April 2017 - 12:03 PM

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For the curious, I would guess that Ontario with 67 days might be the greatest amount in Oregon and Smyma with 52 days might be the greatest in Washington (?).


Smyma? Did you mean to say Yakima?

#26
Abbotsford_wx

Posted 14 April 2017 - 12:11 PM

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1981-2010 Averages

 

8.7 days > 30°C (86F)

0.45 days > 35°C (95F)

 

I'm not sure what the exact number of 90F days would be, but probably around 5 days per year.


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#27
Eujunga

Posted 14 April 2017 - 03:40 PM

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Smyma? Did you mean to say Yakima?

 

I think he meant "SMYRNA."  The "r" and the "n" do kind of run together in lower case.


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Tujunga, CA (15 miles N of Downtown L.A.) - Elev. 1,860 ft.

 

Eugene, OR (5 miles SSW) - Elev. 850 ft.


#28
Front Ranger

Posted 14 April 2017 - 03:55 PM

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DEN averages 35 days above 90.

 

BOU averages 25 days above 90.

 

Colorado Springs, further south but higher in elevation, averages a little over 18.


Cool anomalies soothe the soul.


#29
Scott

Posted 14 April 2017 - 04:25 PM

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Smyma? Did you mean to say Yakima?

 

No, but as pointed out, I did spell it wrong.   The correct spelling is Smyrna.  

 

http://www.wrcc.dri....iMAIN.pl?wa7727

 

The average July high there is 92F, which is among the warmest for Washington. 



#30
Scott

Posted 14 April 2017 - 04:29 PM

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DEN averages 35 days above 90.

 

BOU averages 25 days above 90.

 

Colorado Springs, further south but higher in elevation, averages a little over 18.

 

The most in Western Colorado might belong to Uravan with 76.  

 

Las Animas has 85.  This may be the highest in Colorado? 



#31
Front Ranger

Posted 14 April 2017 - 04:52 PM

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The most in Western Colorado might belong to Uravan with 76.  

 

Las Animas has 85.  This may be the highest in Colorado? 

 

Yeah, I think that's it. Closest are Ordway with 83 and La Junta with 77.


Cool anomalies soothe the soul.


#32
Scott

Posted 14 April 2017 - 04:56 PM

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This may be an obscure (but interesting) and slightly off topic question, but  I wonder what the maximum difference is between the average January low and average July high is.

 

Dinosaur Quarry in Utah has an average January low of 4F and an average July high of 95F, a difference of more than 90F.  This may be one of the highest in the Lower 40.

 

Dinosaur Quarry in Utah averages 70 days of 90 or above and 24 days zero or below.

 

997302.JPG

 

In Alaska, Chalkyitsik has an average low of -35 January and an average July high of 73F, a difference of 107F, however the period of record is only one decade.

 

Circle City Alaska has an average low of -25F in January and an average high of 73F, a difference of 98F.  The period of record is 99 years.

 

Central (village) Alaska has an average January low of -28 and an average July high of 72F, a difference of 100F, but the record is only a few decades. 


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#33
Black Hole

Posted 14 April 2017 - 09:53 PM

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Where can you go to see how many 90 degree temps (or other numbers) occur on average for a location? 


BS Atmospheric Science University of Utah May 2015

PhD Candidate Atmospheric Sciences

 

--Emphasis on: Forecasting, Mountain Weather, Numerical Weather Prediction, Data Assimilation

 

Winter 2017/2018

Dec 4: 3.2"

 

 

Winter 2016/17 Snow:
Nov 17: 3.2", 23: 1.6", 28: 9.2" (14)

Dec 1: .5", 16: 2.5", 25: 13" (16)

Jan 2: 5", 3: 2.4", 4: 7.7", 12: 1", 19: 1.2", 21: 13", 23: 6", 24: 1", 25: 3.7", 26: 2.5" (43.5) 

Feb 11: .5", 23: 6.5", 27: 4.5" (13.5)

Mar 5: 5.5" (5.5)

Apr 8: 2", 9: 1.8" (3.8)

May 17: 1" (1)
Total: 96.3"

Lowest Temp: 2F


#34
wx_statman

Posted 15 April 2017 - 03:11 PM

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Abeche, the 4th largest city in Chad, apparently gets 336 days at 90+ per year. 

 

https://en.wikipedia.../Abéché#Climate


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#35
wx_statman

Posted 15 April 2017 - 03:15 PM

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Where can you go to see how many 90 degree temps (or other numbers) occur on average for a location? 

 

The WRCC is a good resource for the first-order stations:

 

http://www.wrcc.dri....atedata/tables/

 

Click on the 


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#36
Kayla

Posted 15 April 2017 - 04:34 PM

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Looks like here in Bozeman we average only 7 days yearly above 90º.


Cold season 2017/18:

Total snowfall: 56.2"
Largest snowfall: 10.2"
Coldest high: 17ºF
Coldest low: 1ºF

Sub-zero days: 0

 

Personal Weather Station on Wunderground: https://www.wundergr...OZEM152#history


#37
Phil

Posted 15 April 2017 - 09:56 PM

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We might try for our first 90+ high tomorrow. Just missed it last week with 88*F.
Personal Weather Station, Live Stream on Wunderground: https://www.wundergr...BETHE62#history

Cold season 2017/18:
Snowfall: 0"
Largest snowfall: 0"
Number of winter events: 0
Coldest High 67*F
Coldest low: 44*F
Highest sustained wind: 17mph
Highest wind gust: 26mph

#38
Mr Marine Layer

Posted 16 April 2017 - 07:18 AM

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Interesting thing is that both Alaska and Hawaii have state record highs of 100 F, even though one place is tropical and the other is sub-Arctic to Arctic. It shows how the ocean limits high temperatures. Fairbanks also averages warmer than San Francisco during July.

I once saw a Survivor episode where they said it was 120 F, but don't see how that could be possible near the beach anywhere.

#39
Scott

Posted 16 April 2017 - 05:42 PM

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Abeche, the 4th largest city in Chad, apparently gets 336 days at 90+ per year. 

 

https://en.wikipedia.../Abéché#Climate

 

Dallol, Ethiopia has a somewhat similar climate, but ~10 degrees warmer on average.   Daytime temperatures there are almost never below 90.

 

Temperatures there reach 100F year round.   Only in January and February does the average high drop to 97.

Although the period of record is relatively short, it is probably the hottest place on earth. 



#40
wx_statman

Posted 16 April 2017 - 09:13 PM

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Dallol, Ethiopia has a somewhat similar climate, but ~10 degrees warmer on average.   Daytime temperatures there are almost never below 90.

 

Temperatures there reach 100F year round.   Only in January and February does the average high drop to 97.

Although the period of record is relatively short, it is probably the hottest place on earth. 

 

The problem with Dallol was that the station only existed from something like 1960 to 1966, and it wasn't an inhabited place. I think it was a mining site? It did hold the world record for highest average temperature over any 6 year span. 



#41
Scott

Posted 17 April 2017 - 07:26 AM

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The problem with Dallol was that the station only existed from something like 1960 to 1966, and it wasn't an inhabited place.

 

 

It actually was an inhabited place, but now is abandoned.   It used to be high on my list of places to go, but it has become less safe is recent years due to the Ethiopia and Eritrea skirmishes.

 

Salt is still mined there, but people don't stay year round.



#42
happ

Posted 17 April 2017 - 09:31 AM

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It actually was an inhabited place, but now is abandoned.   It used to be high on my list of places to go, but it has become less safe is recent years due to the Ethiopia and Eritrea.

 

Salt is still mined there, but people don't stay year round.

 

Death Valley is also sparsely populated but surprising how many people visit during summer; Europeans in particular seem to enjoy the intense heat.   



#43
Phil

Posted 17 April 2017 - 12:07 PM

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Just missed our first 90*F day yesterday, as a thunderstorm capped us at 89.1*F.
Personal Weather Station, Live Stream on Wunderground: https://www.wundergr...BETHE62#history

Cold season 2017/18:
Snowfall: 0"
Largest snowfall: 0"
Number of winter events: 0
Coldest High 67*F
Coldest low: 44*F
Highest sustained wind: 17mph
Highest wind gust: 26mph

#44
Front Ranger

Posted 17 April 2017 - 12:20 PM

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Death Valley is also sparsely populated but surprising how many people visit during summer; Europeans in particular seem to enjoy the intense heat.   

 

Yeah, when I visited there 11 years ago I was surprised out how many people were there and actually trekking across the sand in the heat. Guess people want that true desert experience.


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#45
IbrChris

Posted 17 April 2017 - 06:01 PM

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The problem with Dallol was that the station only existed from something like 1960 to 1966, and it wasn't an inhabited place. I think it was a mining site? It did hold the world record for highest average temperature over any 6 year span. 

Mecca, in Saudi Arabia, is by far the hottest decent-sized city in the world. Perhaps a small city might beat it although the UHI undoubtedly helps Mecca as well. According to Weatherbase for a 10 year POR Mecca averaged 298 days above 90 a year, the only months that 90s were less than 25 days on average were DJF.

Annual dewpoint in Mecca averages 62 F with a low average of 56 in Feb and a high average of 68 in Sept making it a fairly humid locale given the regularity of 100+ temps. It's basically Phoenix without even a hint of winter, with more humidity and with a longer period where highs average 100+.


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#46
IbrChris

Posted 17 April 2017 - 06:14 PM

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The problem with Dallol was that the station only existed from something like 1960 to 1966, and it wasn't an inhabited place. I think it was a mining site? It did hold the world record for highest average temperature over any 6 year span. 

Given the location of Dallol fairly close to the equator a shorter POR is more representative of the climate than it would be for a mid-latitude location that experiences greater temp variability. IMO it's fairly valid assuming the data is accurate. Dallol however isn't a populated place. The hottest place in the world (uninhabited) is probably in the Afar Depression (near Dallol but slightly lower elevation...below sea level) which is likely a degree or so hotter for an annual average temp. The Dasht-e-Lut desert in SE Iran is often quoted as the spot that has recorded the highest "skin" (ground) temperature in the world as measured by satellite (172 F) but it's doubtful it has the highest annual mean temperature in the world.


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#47
Front Ranger

Posted 17 April 2017 - 06:22 PM

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Mecca, in Saudi Arabia, is by far the hottest decent-sized city in the world. Perhaps a small city might beat it although the UHI undoubtedly helps Mecca as well. According to Weatherbase for a 10 year POR Mecca averaged 298 days above 90 a year, the only months that 90s were less than 25 days on average were DJF.

Annual dewpoint in Mecca averages 62 F with a low average of 56 in Feb and a high average of 68 in Sept making it a fairly humid locale given the regularity of 100+ temps. It's basically Phoenix without even a hint of winter, with more humidity and with a longer period where highs average 100+.


Pretty sucky place to be home base for your religion.
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#48
IbrChris

Posted 17 April 2017 - 06:25 PM

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Pretty sucky place to be home base for your religion.

 

There's a reason they wear white robes...lol. Except the women...they tend to wear mostly black burqas.


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#49
Scott

Posted 17 April 2017 - 07:38 PM

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The hottest place in the world (uninhabited) is probably in the Afar Depression (near Dallol but slightly lower elevation...below sea level) which is likely a degree or so hotter for an annual average temp. 

 

 

Dallol is in the the Afar (a.k.a. Danakil) Depression at 430 feet below sea level.   The lowest point in the depression is 515 feet, so Dallol is only 85 feet higher.

 

In the same region, Assab, Eritrea has an average dew point of 84F in some of the summer months.  Given the average temperatures of over 100F in the summer, that's pretty nasty.

 

Luckily much of Ethiopia has a pleasant climate, because of elevation.  If it weren't for the pollution, Addis Ababa (elevation just over 8000 feet) would be a contender for having the most pleasant climate in the world.   It has only hit 90 there once and have hit freezing only twice.   In the coolest month, daytime temperatures average 69.   In the hottest month, daytime temperatures average 78, with most of the year in the low 70's.

 

Annual dewpoint

 

 

On a side note, the highest dew point may belong to Dhraran in Saudi Arabia, with 95F (actually temperature of 108F).   The heat index was 176F(!) that day, which may be the highest in the world.  

Bankok Thailand is another place with oppressive heat/humidity combination.  Temperatures don't get nearly as hot as on the Arabian Peninsula or the Sahara an the land west of the Red Sea, but the humidity and heat are constantly oppressive.  

Back when I was young and would travel on the cheap, I spent time in Bankok trying to sleep without air conditioning.  Because of the humidity and sweat, most bed mattresses are covered in plastic.   I would try to sleep by soaking myself, but the humidity was so high that the water wouldn't evaporate.  People living there are used to it, but I don't think I ever got a good night sleep the whole time I was there. 


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#50
happ

Posted 17 April 2017 - 08:27 PM

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Dallol is in the the Afar (a.k.a. Danakil) Depression at 430 feet below sea level.   The lowest point in the depression is 515 feet, so Dallol is only 85 feet higher.

 

In the same region, Assab, Eritrea has an average dew point of 84F in some of the summer months.  Given the average temperatures of over 100F in the summer, that's pretty nasty.

 

Luckily much of Ethiopia has a pleasant climate, because of elevation.  If it weren't for the pollution, Addis Ababa (elevation just over 8000 feet) would be a contender for having the most pleasant climate in the world.   It has only hit 90 there once and have hit freezing only twice.   In the coolest month, daytime temperatures average 69.   In the hottest month, daytime temperatures average 78, with most of the year in the low 70's.

 

 

On a side note, the highest dew point may belong to Dhraran in Saudi Arabia, with 95F (actually temperature of 108F).   The heat index was 176F(!) that day, which may be the highest in the world.  

Bankok Thailand is another place with oppressive heat/humidity combination.  Temperatures don't get nearly as hot as on the Arabian Peninsula or the Sahara an the land west of the Red Sea, but the humidity and heat are constantly oppressive.  

Back when I was young and would travel on the cheap, I spent time in Bankok trying to sleep without air conditioning.  Because of the humidity and sweat, most bed mattresses are covered in plastic.   I would try to sleep by soaking myself, but the humidity was so high that the water wouldn't evaporate.  People living there are used to it, but I don't think I ever got a good night sleep the whole time I was there. 

 

Can't live without ceiling fans even in LA