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Days Per Year of 90°> Where You Live

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#51
Phil

Posted 17 April 2017 - 10:05 PM

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Dallol is in the the Afar (a.k.a. Danakil) Depression at 430 feet below sea level. The lowest point in the depression is 515 feet, so Dallol is only 85 feet higher.

In the same region, Assab, Eritrea has an average dew point of 84F in some of the summer months. Given the average temperatures of over 100F in the summer, that's pretty nasty.

Luckily much of Ethiopia has a pleasant climate, because of elevation. If it weren't for the pollution, Addis Ababa (elevation just over 8000 feet) would be a contender for having the most pleasant climate in the world. It has only hit 90 there once and have hit freezing only twice. In the coolest month, daytime temperatures average 69. In the hottest month, daytime temperatures average 78, with most of the year in the low 70's.


On a side note, the highest dew point may belong to Dhraran in Saudi Arabia, with 95F (actually temperature of 108F). The heat index was 176F(!) that day, which may be the highest in the world.

Bankok Thailand is another place with oppressive heat/humidity combination. Temperatures don't get nearly as hot as on the Arabian Peninsula or the Sahara an the land west of the Red Sea, but the humidity and heat are constantly oppressive.

Back when I was young and would travel on the cheap, I spent time in Bankok trying to sleep without air conditioning. Because of the humidity and sweat, most bed mattresses are covered in plastic. I would try to sleep by soaking myself, but the humidity was so high that the water wouldn't evaporate. People living there are used to it, but I don't think I ever got a good night sleep the whole time I was there.


I visited Dubai once (in summer) several years back. I'm never doing it again..pure hell.
Personal Weather Station, Live Stream on Wunderground: https://www.wundergr...BETHE62#history

Cold season 2017/18:
Snowfall: 0"
Largest snowfall: 0"
Number of winter events: 0
Coldest High 67*F
Coldest low: 44*F
Highest sustained wind: 17mph
Highest wind gust: 26mph

#52
Scott

Posted 18 April 2017 - 07:47 AM

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I visited Dubai once (in summer) several years back. I'm never doing it again..pure hell. 

 

 

I was there in December once.   It was actually pretty nice then!



#53
Thunder98

Posted 18 April 2017 - 08:42 AM

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It only went above 90F 3 days last year in Orcutt, CA while in 2015 it went above 90F 14 days.



#54
Scott

Posted 18 April 2017 - 10:34 AM

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The Dasht-e-Lut desert in SE Iran is often quoted as the spot that has recorded the highest "skin" (ground) temperature in the world as measured by satellite (172 F) but it's doubtful it has the highest annual mean temperature in the world.

 

 

In contrast to the above, it is worth mentioning that the deadliest known blizzard on earth also happened in Iran in 1972:

 

http://devastatingdi...-blizzard-1972/

 

4000-5000 people died and in places in southern Iran, the snow depth (actually depth, not drifts) was 26 feet.   :o



#55
Phil

Posted 18 April 2017 - 03:08 PM

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In contrast to the above, it is worth mentioning that the deadliest known blizzard on earth also happened in Iran in 1972:

http://devastatingdi...-blizzard-1972/

At 4000-5000 people died and in places in southern Iran, the snow depth (actually depth, not drifts) was 26 feet. :o


Yikes, wtf?
Personal Weather Station, Live Stream on Wunderground: https://www.wundergr...BETHE62#history

Cold season 2017/18:
Snowfall: 0"
Largest snowfall: 0"
Number of winter events: 0
Coldest High 67*F
Coldest low: 44*F
Highest sustained wind: 17mph
Highest wind gust: 26mph

#56
wx_statman

Posted 18 April 2017 - 09:23 PM

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Death Valley is also sparsely populated but surprising how many people visit during summer; Europeans in particular seem to enjoy the intense heat.   

 

Some of them totally misjudge it and get themselves killed too. The "Death Valley Germans" case from back in the 1990's comes to mind. When that German family took a rental minivan onto Death Valley backroads on a 120 degree day. Blew a tire and ended up succumbing to the elements. 



#57
wx_statman

Posted 18 April 2017 - 09:33 PM

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In contrast to the above, it is worth mentioning that the deadliest known blizzard on earth also happened in Iran in 1972:

 

http://devastatingdi...-blizzard-1972/

 

4000-5000 people died and in places in southern Iran, the snow depth (actually depth, not drifts) was 26 feet.   :o

 

That's some suspect reporting on that website. I guarantee you there was no place in southern Iran that measured 312" snow depth (26 feet). 

 

Definitely a real event, but c'mon. 

 

On another note, the southern shore of the Caspian can get some pretty wicked lake effect snow. That's a long fetch over relatively warm water for a N-S wind blowing out of Russia. 

 

https://www.wundergr...n-shore-of-iran

 

Chris Burt mentions the 1972 Iran blizzard toward the end of the article too, fwiw. He talks about 26 foot drifts...which would make more sense. Pretty amazing regardless.



#58
Scott

Posted 18 April 2017 - 09:45 PM

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That's some suspect reporting on that website. I guarantee you there was no place in southern Iran that measured 312" snow depth (26 feet). 

 

 

That source isn't the only one mentioning the snow depths; many others do as well (actually all other sources I see, besides the one you point out quote 26-28 feet).

 

https://www.google.c...iw=1440&bih=809

 

Although they may come from exaggerated news sources, up to 9 meters of snow is reported on many sources.  26 drifts does seem more plausible, but the storm did completely wipe out entire villages with no survivors.  10 feet doesn't seem to be enough to wipe out entire villages with no survivors.

Here is a supposed photograph on one of the articles (but maybe it isn't really from Iran?):

 

4560b2d9-ef19-410d-906e-1aaf912c223f.jpg

 

Of course, it must be mentioned that Iran has a very diverse climate.   Although it does have very hot places, there are actually sizable glaciers in the mountains.    Some of the mountains actually receive heavy snowfall.   Even in mid-September, I personally witnessed a 4 foot snowfall in the Caucasus Mountains, which really aren't that far from Iran. 

This is a summer shot of Alam Kooh, Iran:

 

3958.jpg

 

Several mountains in Iran are much higher than anything in the Alps, Cascades, Rockies, or Sierra Nevada.


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#59
wx_statman

Posted 20 April 2017 - 12:32 PM

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That source isn't the only one mentioning the snow depths; many others do as well (actually all other sources I see, besides the one you point out quote 26-28 feet).

 

https://www.google.c...iw=1440&bih=809

 

Although they may come from exaggerated news sources, up to 9 meters of snow is reported on many sources.  26 drifts does seem more plausible, but the storm did completely wipe out entire villages with no survivors.  10 feet doesn't seem to be enough to wipe out entire villages with no survivors.
 

 

The internet is full of bad sources/info. 



#60
Scott

Posted 20 April 2017 - 02:34 PM

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The internet is full of bad sources/info. 

 

 

True, but the internet sources are simply copied from the newspapers of 1972 (both Iranian and US).  They may well be exaggerated and I agree that 26 feet sounds implausible.  

 

1658674_464948426960280_1122248282_o.jpg

 

Without photos and official weather stations to verify, it is hard to say what the actual snow totals were.

 

On another note, the southern shore of the Caspian can get some pretty wicked lake effect snow. That's a long fetch over relatively warm water for a N-S wind blowing out of Russia. 

 

 

 

If you are interested, here is a more recent snowfall in that region.   This was a storm that hit the Gilan and Mazandaran areas of Iran (south of the Caspian Sea) in February 2014:

 

http://forums.accuwe...t=60&p=1839608



#61
Front Ranger

Posted 20 April 2017 - 03:09 PM

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Probably a 26' drift somewhere, but probably not representative of what actually fell, or even general drifts in the region. But if the storm truly did last close to a week, I suppose it's possible 12'+ fell. Pretty crazy.


Cool anomalies soothe the soul.


#62
happ

Posted 24 April 2017 - 10:48 AM

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Lots of territory already recording 90's this spring; especially noteworthy in Midwest/ Great Plains 

 

Attached Files



#63
wx_statman

Posted 24 April 2017 - 10:56 PM

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Lots of territory already recording 90's this spring; especially noteworthy in Midwest/ Great Plains 

 

Oklahoma had that ridiculous 99 degree reading on February 11th. Tied the state record for the month. 

Attached Files



#64
Phil

Posted 24 April 2017 - 11:02 PM

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Some of the modeling is toasty out here next weekend. Good chance DCA approaches 95 degrees.
Personal Weather Station, Live Stream on Wunderground: https://www.wundergr...BETHE62#history

Cold season 2017/18:
Snowfall: 0"
Largest snowfall: 0"
Number of winter events: 0
Coldest High 67*F
Coldest low: 44*F
Highest sustained wind: 17mph
Highest wind gust: 26mph

#65
Scott

Posted 25 April 2017 - 06:09 AM

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On and off snow is forcasted here for the rest of the week.



#66
happ

Posted 25 April 2017 - 09:18 AM

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Oklahoma had that ridiculous 99 degree reading on February 11th. Tied the state record for the month. 

 

That's scary. Also Texas can get some ridiculous winter heat.



#67
happ

Posted 25 April 2017 - 09:21 AM

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On and off snow is forcasted here for the rest of the week.

Considering your elevation, do you get summer temps much above the 80's?



#68
Scott

Posted 25 April 2017 - 09:33 AM

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Considering your elevation, do you get summer temps much above the 80's?

 

 

Yes, but it's usually cool at night.   Here is a screen shot from last July which was about as close to normal as possible.   Our (1980-2010) average high in July is 88.9 and our average low in July is 46.5.

997077.JPG


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#69
happ

Posted 25 April 2017 - 09:38 AM

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Yes, but it's usually cool at night.   Here is a screen shot from last July which was about as close to normal as possible.   Our (1980-2010) average high in July is 88.9 and our average low in July is 46.5.

997077.JPG

Wow, a 52-degree spread on 7/14.



#70
Scott

Posted 25 April 2017 - 11:46 AM

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Wow, a 52-degree spread on 7/14.

 

 

Also 53 on the 27th, 55 on the 28th, and 52 on the 30th.

 

Still, that's not unusual.   I have seen it go from 32 to 97 in a day.   Freezing to low 90's happens more frequently than freezing to upper 90's though.

 

Random example:

 

998019.JPG

 

Here's 30's to 90's in six hours on one July day in 2007:

 

997070.JPG



#71
happ

Posted 25 April 2017 - 12:24 PM

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Also 53 on the 27th, 55 on the 28th, and 52 on the 30th.

 

Still, that's not unusual.   I have seen it go from 32 to 97 in a day.   Freezing to low 90's happens more frequently than freezing to upper 90's though.

 

Random example:

 

998019.JPG

 

Here's 30's to 90's in six hours on one July day in 2007:

 

997070.JPG

 

It is very difficult to get those extremes in lower elevation. Some inland stations in San Diego county that follow riverbeds [Rancho San Pasqual] can get some really cold minimums and then have the hottest maximums in the state during winter.  



#72
Scott

Posted 25 April 2017 - 12:55 PM

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It is very difficult to get those extremes in lower elevation. Some inland stations in San Diego county that follow riverbeds [Rancho San Pasqual] can get some really cold minimums and then have the hottest maximums in the state during winter.  

 

 

For those diurnal temperature swings, an exposed valley bottom location with low humidity and a fair distance from the ocean is needed.

 

In California, placed like Bishop have similar temperature swings in summer, but of course, Bishop is quite a bit hotter than us.   Higher up Bodie and Boca California can have some really wild swings at times.

At low elevations, some locations such as Palm Springs can have some pretty good diurnal changes as well.  Sometimes Redding as well.


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#73
happ

Posted 25 April 2017 - 01:08 PM

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I experienced similar conditions camping out in Tioga Pass [9,943 ft.] during summer. It may take several months to clear the pass road of snow this year. B)



#74
Phil

Posted 25 April 2017 - 04:28 PM

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Ugh, summer. I wish we had cool nights like that. Often times our heat index struggles to drop below 90*F at night, then it's right back into the blast furnace by 8-9AM. Disgusting.

I also need a loud fan running all night to drown out the noise from the katydids and robust coneheads. Simply amazing how loud those bugs are. Then right at dawn, the swamp cicadas start screaming, and the scissor-grinder cicadas start later in the afternoon.
Personal Weather Station, Live Stream on Wunderground: https://www.wundergr...BETHE62#history

Cold season 2017/18:
Snowfall: 0"
Largest snowfall: 0"
Number of winter events: 0
Coldest High 67*F
Coldest low: 44*F
Highest sustained wind: 17mph
Highest wind gust: 26mph

#75
Phil

Posted 25 April 2017 - 04:31 PM

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How anyone can sleep with these things blasting is beyond me.

http://songsofinsect...robust-conehead
Personal Weather Station, Live Stream on Wunderground: https://www.wundergr...BETHE62#history

Cold season 2017/18:
Snowfall: 0"
Largest snowfall: 0"
Number of winter events: 0
Coldest High 67*F
Coldest low: 44*F
Highest sustained wind: 17mph
Highest wind gust: 26mph

#76
weatherfan2012

Posted 25 April 2017 - 05:48 PM

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Ugh, summer. I wish we had cool nights like that. Often times our heat index struggles to drop below 90*F at night, then it's right back into the blast furnace by 8-9AM. Disgusting.

I also need a loud fan running all night to drown out the noise from the katydids and robust coneheads. Simply amazing how loud those bugs are. Then right at dawn, the swamp cicadas start screaming, and the scissor-grinder cicadas start later in the afternoon.

Summer the sounds of the Bugs  :lol:



#77
happ

Posted 25 April 2017 - 07:27 PM

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How anyone can sleep with these things blasting is beyond me.

http://songsofinsect...robust-conehead

 

Sounds of the countryside. Just crickets here competing with sirens & helicopters.


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#78
Phil

Posted 25 April 2017 - 08:29 PM

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Sounds of the countryside. Just crickets here competing with sirens & helicopters.


Lol, I'd take sirens and helicopters over these f**kers any day.
Personal Weather Station, Live Stream on Wunderground: https://www.wundergr...BETHE62#history

Cold season 2017/18:
Snowfall: 0"
Largest snowfall: 0"
Number of winter events: 0
Coldest High 67*F
Coldest low: 44*F
Highest sustained wind: 17mph
Highest wind gust: 26mph

#79
DareDuck

Posted 25 April 2017 - 09:04 PM

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La Pine and Sunriver in central OR commonly experience 50 degree diurnal swings. At 4300' in a wind sheltered valley with low humidity and dew point, it frequently goes from 33-37 on summer mornings up to 86-90 during the afternoons.

Bend, OR Elevation: 3550'

 

Snow history:

2016/2017: 70"

2015/2016: 34"

 

Average: ~25"


#80
wx_statman

Posted 25 April 2017 - 11:55 PM

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Speaking of diurnal temp ranges, US records that I'm aware of:

 

-Largest diurnal increase from solar radiation: 75 degrees at Deeth, NV on 9/21/1954, from 12 to 87 degrees.

 

-Largest diurnal increase within calendar day, any mechanism: 83 degrees at Granville, ND on 2/21/1918, from -33 to 50 degrees (due to Chinook wind).

 

-Largest increase over 24 hours, spanning two calendar days: 103 degrees at Loma, MT on January 14-15, 1972, from -54 to 49 degrees (Chinook).

 

The latter two are world records as far as I'm aware. 


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#81
Front Ranger

Posted 26 April 2017 - 08:12 AM

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Speaking of diurnal temp ranges, US records that I'm aware of:

 

-Largest diurnal increase from solar radiation: 75 degrees at Deeth, NV on 9/21/1954, from 12 to 87 degrees.

 

-Largest diurnal increase within calendar day, any mechanism: 83 degrees at Granville, ND on 2/21/1918, from -33 to 50 degrees (due to Chinook wind).

 

-Largest increase over 24 hours, spanning two calendar days: 103 degrees at Loma, MT on January 14-15, 1972, from -54 to 49 degrees (Chinook).

 

The latter two are world records as far as I'm aware. 

 

Would that have been considered a Chinook wind? I've always been under the impression that Chinook winds occur on the lee side of mountains, and obviously ND is far away from the Rockies. 

 

Of course, the interesting thing about the name Chinook is that it comes from coastal PNW Native Americans, due to the warm Pacific origins of associated air masses.

 

Personally, I've witnessed Chinook winds here raise temps from about -10 to near 50 within 6 hours.


Cool anomalies soothe the soul.


#82
happ

Posted 26 April 2017 - 09:18 AM

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FWIW

 

AccuWeather summer forecast

 

 

Attached Files



#83
Scott

Posted 26 April 2017 - 09:23 AM

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-Largest diurnal increase from solar radiation: 75 degrees at Deeth, NV on 9/21/1954, from 12 to 87 degrees.

 

 

While working at the bridge, I recorded a 72 diurnal increase from 8 to 80 degrees on 10/23/2003, but temperatures taken at the river, and because of cold air pooling it is kind of cheating.   At the official weather station, the range was 18 to 80, so only 62 degrees on that day (which is still pretty large). 

 

At the official weather station, since I lived here the temperature has gone from 32 to 95 in a day, a 63 degree rise.   At the house, 65 degrees is probably the most I have seen (32 to 97).

 

Just west of us though, Maybell has us beat.  On 2/1/1985 the temperature rose from -61 to 6, a rise of 67 degrees.   This was matched the next day when the temperature rose from -52 to 15.

 

This January, where I live the temperature went from -43 to +43 in two days, but that's not quite as impressive as some of the changes that have happened in eastern Montana.

 

Although not populated, Peter Sinks has some of the largest diurnal changes (possibly even the largest), even though there are no Chinooks there.

 

On 2/10/2010 the temperature went from -46 to 28, a 74 degree rise, comparable to the one at Deeth.

 

More recently, on 1/7/2017 Peter Sinks went from -42 to 23, but the impressive part was that 50 degrees of the change actually happened in two hours (which is pretty impressive considering that there are no Chinook winds there):

 

991451.JPG

 

My guess is now that Peter Sinks has a permanent weather station (since 2010), it will probably break the Deeth record eventually, unless it has already and no one happened to notice.


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#84
Scott

Posted 26 April 2017 - 10:27 AM

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FWIW

 

AccuWeather summer forecast

 

post-226-0-10718200-1493227101.jpg

 

Here's my own prediction for Summer 2017:

 

998111.jpg


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#85
Jesse

Posted 26 April 2017 - 11:13 AM

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Would that have been considered a Chinook wind? I've always been under the impression that Chinook winds occur on the lee side of mountains, and obviously ND is far away from the Rockies.

Of course, the interesting thing about the name Chinook is that it comes from coastal PNW Native Americans, due to the warm Pacific origins of associated air masses.

Personally, I've witnessed Chinook winds here raise temps from about -10 to near 50 within 6 hours.


Chinook wind can refer to any breaking through of a marine airmass (west or SW winds) in the Central to Northern Rockies or Plains when there is cold air in place, Mr. Semantics. ;)

#86
Front Ranger

Posted 26 April 2017 - 11:47 AM

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Chinook wind can refer to any breaking through of a marine airmass (west or SW winds) in the Central to Northern Rockies or Plains when there is cold air in place, Mr. Semantics. ;)

 

How did I know you'd jump on this?  :D

 

I suppose it could, you just don't hear it in the Plains context nearly as much. And I've definitely seen it defined as relating to the lee side of mountains.


Cool anomalies soothe the soul.


#87
Jesse

Posted 26 April 2017 - 11:59 AM

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How did I know you'd jump on this? :D

I suppose it could, you just don't hear it in the Plains context nearly as much. And I've definitely seen it defined as relating to the lee side of mountains.


North Dakota is on the lee side of the Rockies.
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#88
Front Ranger

Posted 26 April 2017 - 12:47 PM

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North Dakota is on the lee side of the Rockies.

 

So is New York. 

 

Generally when you're referring to the lee side of something, you're not talking about a completely different region hundreds of miles away.


Cool anomalies soothe the soul.


#89
Jesse

Posted 26 April 2017 - 01:39 PM

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So is New York.

Generally when you're referring to the lee side of something, you're not talking about a completely different region hundreds of miles away.


Bad analogy. North Dakota is much closer to/influenced by the Rockies. Especially the western part of the state, where that record was likely set.

This discussion is a good example of how you can be a total pain in the a** to debate on just about any topic, though. It's clearly a gift. :)

#90
Front Ranger

Posted 26 April 2017 - 01:58 PM

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Bad analogy. North Dakota is much closer to/influenced by the Rockies. Especially the western part of the state, where that record was likely set.

This discussion is a good example of how you can be a total pain in the a** to debate on just about any topic, though. It's clearly a gift. :)

 

Granville, ND is over 500 mi from the Rockies. 

 

Hey, as someone who lives in an area affected by Chinook winds all the time, I was just pointing out that I haven't seen that term in reference to areas that far east, away from the mountains. I never said he was necessarily wrong to call it that, it just struck me as odd.

 

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#91
Jesse

Posted 26 April 2017 - 02:12 PM

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I'm done with this discussion Jared. Not worth my time, like usual.



#92
Front Ranger

Posted 26 April 2017 - 02:41 PM

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I'm done with this discussion Jared. Not worth my time, like usual.

 

Then why did you jump in and act like it's a big deal? Lame copout, as usual. I made a valid point, but of course you're refusing to acknowledge it, under the guise of "not worth your time".  :rolleyes:

 

You do realize that your responses make some molehill-sized points I make into mountains, right? If you were simply able to just say: "Sure, that makes sense. Chinook does usually refers to areas near mountains, but I think it could apply out on the plains as well", instead of inserting your personal butt-hurt, conversations would go much better. 


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#93
Jesse

Posted 26 April 2017 - 02:53 PM

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Then why did you jump in and act like it's a big deal? Lame copout, as usual. I made a valid point, but of course you're refusing to acknowledge it, under the guise of "not worth your time". :rolleyes:

You do realize that your responses make some molehill-sized points I make into mountains, right? If you were simply able to just say: "Sure, that makes sense. Chinook does usually refers to areas near mountains, but I think it could apply out on the plains as well", instead of inserting your personal butt-hurt, conversations would go much better.


Yeah, no. You started nitpicking some pretty valuable climate data that Dmitri was providing, for no reason other than your apparent love of needling others on semantics. When I clarified, rather than just admitting that you were mistaken in your definition of Chinook winds and moving on, you continued down the semantic rabbit hole. As I said, just not worth my time.

#94
Phil

Posted 26 April 2017 - 03:14 PM

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Here's my own prediction for Summer 2017:

998111.jpg


Looks about right. :lol:
Personal Weather Station, Live Stream on Wunderground: https://www.wundergr...BETHE62#history

Cold season 2017/18:
Snowfall: 0"
Largest snowfall: 0"
Number of winter events: 0
Coldest High 67*F
Coldest low: 44*F
Highest sustained wind: 17mph
Highest wind gust: 26mph

#95
Phil

Posted 26 April 2017 - 03:24 PM

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So is New York.

Generally when you're referring to the lee side of something, you're not talking about a completely different region hundreds of miles away.


The Chinook actually has a larger temperature impact over the Plains than the leeward side of the mountains themselves.

The warming is derived via adiabatic compression, and that effect continues so long as the air is descending. Locations hundreds of miles downwind under the streamflow are affected, including the Plains.
Personal Weather Station, Live Stream on Wunderground: https://www.wundergr...BETHE62#history

Cold season 2017/18:
Snowfall: 0"
Largest snowfall: 0"
Number of winter events: 0
Coldest High 67*F
Coldest low: 44*F
Highest sustained wind: 17mph
Highest wind gust: 26mph

#96
Phil

Posted 26 April 2017 - 03:28 PM

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Granville, ND is over 500 mi from the Rockies.

Hey, as someone who lives in an area affected by Chinook winds all the time, I was just pointing out that I haven't seen that term in reference to areas that far east, away from the mountains. I never said he was necessarily wrong to call it that, it just struck me as odd.

Screenshot_7.png


You're doing it again.
Personal Weather Station, Live Stream on Wunderground: https://www.wundergr...BETHE62#history

Cold season 2017/18:
Snowfall: 0"
Largest snowfall: 0"
Number of winter events: 0
Coldest High 67*F
Coldest low: 44*F
Highest sustained wind: 17mph
Highest wind gust: 26mph

#97
Front Ranger

Posted 26 April 2017 - 03:37 PM

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Yeah, no. You started nitpicking some pretty valuable climate data that Dmitri was providing, for no reason other than your apparent love of needling others on semantics. When I clarified, rather than just admitting that you were mistaken in your definition of Chinook winds and moving on, you continued down the semantic rabbit hole. As I said, just not worth my time.

 

This is 100% untrue. I wasn't needling at all, I brought up the point with respect and asked a question: "Would that have been considered a Chinook wind? I've always been under the impression that Chinook winds occur on the lee side of mountains".

 

Then, when you made your point, I actually made a partial concession to what you said: "I suppose it could, you just don't hear it in the Plains context nearly as much."

 

You, on the other hand, made absolute statements rather than questions, and made no hint of a concession to my points. So don't tell me I was the one needling and making an issue out of nothing here.

 

The way you interpret things does not always match reality.


Cool anomalies soothe the soul.


#98
Front Ranger

Posted 26 April 2017 - 03:41 PM

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The Chinook actually has a larger temperature impact over the Plains than the leeward side of the mountains themselves.

The warming is derived via adiabatic compression, and that effect continues so long as the air is descending. Locations hundreds of miles downwind under the streamflow are affected, including the Plains.

 

Sure, as long as the air is descending the warming effect is there. My point was simply that usually, in my experience and by popular definition, "Chinook" refers to the winds coming down the lee side of mountains. His use struck me as odd, because I just haven't heard it associated with places that far away from the Rockies.

 

Researching it a little further, it seems that my initial impression was correct - pretty much anywhere you read about Chinook winds, it's closely associated with mountains nearby. It's not a HUGE deal like Jesse is making it out to be, just one of those things that weather nerds discuss.  :)


Cool anomalies soothe the soul.


#99
Jesse

Posted 26 April 2017 - 03:57 PM

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Researching it a little further, it does not seem that my initial impression was incorrect. It's not a HUGE deal like Jesse is making it out to be, just one of those things that weather nerds discuss. :)


Dude, stop trying to frame this like something it wasn't. This is on you. I'm sure Phil and Dmitri would agree.

#100
Front Ranger

Posted 26 April 2017 - 03:59 PM

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Dude, stop trying to frame this like something it wasn't. This is on you. I'm sure Phil and Dmitri would agree.

 

I already pointed out the facts. I asked a question with respect, you made absolute statements. I made a concession, you did not.

 

Your response and misinterpretation of my intentions is on you. Try to have a civil discussion without making needless accusations.


Cool anomalies soothe the soul.