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Days Per Year of 90°> Where You Live

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#101
Jesse

Posted 26 April 2017 - 04:11 PM

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I already pointed out the facts. I asked a question with respect, you made absolute statements. I made a concession, you did not.

Your response and misinterpretation of my intentions is on you. Try to have a civil discussion without making needless accusations.


Wow, you are really twisted. :lol:

Are absolute statements inherently a bad thing? Especially when they are accurate ones which actually encompass a larger definition of a meteorological phenomenon? And why should I be making any concessions when my point was correct?

#102
Front Ranger

Posted 26 April 2017 - 04:16 PM

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Wow, you are really twisted. :lol:

Are absolute statements inherently a bad thing? Especially when they are accurate ones which actually encompass a larger definition of a meteorological phenomenon? And why should I be making any concessions when my point was correct?

 

So my point that Chinook winds are typically associated with places closer to the mountains was incorrect?


Cool anomalies soothe the soul.


#103
wx_statman

Posted 26 April 2017 - 10:59 PM

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Would that have been considered a Chinook wind? I've always been under the impression that Chinook winds occur on the lee side of mountains, and obviously ND is far away from the Rockies. 

 

Of course, the interesting thing about the name Chinook is that it comes from coastal PNW Native Americans, due to the warm Pacific origins of associated air masses.

 

Personally, I've witnessed Chinook winds here raise temps from about -10 to near 50 within 6 hours.

 

I'm not sure, at least technically. I've heard the term used for the Dakotas before. I'm guessing because the winds originate as a Chinook before fanning out over the prairies. I dunno. 


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#104
wx_statman

Posted 26 April 2017 - 11:05 PM

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While working at the bridge, I recorded a 72 diurnal increase from 8 to 80 degrees on 10/23/2003, but temperatures taken at the river, and because of cold air pooling it is kind of cheating.   At the official weather station, the range was 18 to 80, so only 62 degrees on that day (which is still pretty large). 

 

At the official weather station, since I lived here the temperature has gone from 32 to 95 in a day, a 63 degree rise.   At the house, 65 degrees is probably the most I have seen (32 to 97).

 

Just west of us though, Maybell has us beat.  On 2/1/1985 the temperature rose from -61 to 6, a rise of 67 degrees.   This was matched the next day when the temperature rose from -52 to 15.

 

This January, where I live the temperature went from -43 to +43 in two days, but that's not quite as impressive as some of the changes that have happened in eastern Montana.

 

Although not populated, Peter Sinks has some of the largest diurnal changes (possibly even the largest), even though there are no Chinooks there.

 

On 2/10/2010 the temperature went from -46 to 28, a 74 degree rise, comparable to the one at Deeth.

 

More recently, on 1/7/2017 Peter Sinks went from -42 to 23, but the impressive part was that 50 degrees of the change actually happened in two hours (which is pretty impressive considering that there are no Chinook winds there):

 

991451.JPG

 

My guess is now that Peter Sinks has a permanent weather station (since 2010), it will probably break the Deeth record eventually, unless it has already and no one happened to notice.

 

Another good one is Snake River, Wyoming. Rose 72 degrees on March 17, 1906. Low of -50 and high of 22. The minimum was the March US record. 

 

Here in Oregon, Seneca can pull off 60+ degree diurnal ranges fairly easily.



#105
Front Ranger

Posted 27 April 2017 - 07:18 AM

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I'm not sure, at least technically. I've heard the term used for the Dakotas before. I'm guessing because the winds originate as a Chinook before fanning out over the prairies. I dunno. 

 

Yeah, like Phil said it's the same general mechanism as Chinook winds, it's just less pronounced and we don't have a common name for it for areas further east and far away from the Rockies.


Cool anomalies soothe the soul.


#106
Front Ranger

Posted 27 April 2017 - 07:55 AM

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Here's a day from a couple winters ago where Boulder went from 7 degrees at 7 am to 54 at noon, a rise of 47 degrees in 5 hours: https://www.wundergr...ilyHistory.html


Cool anomalies soothe the soul.


#107
Jesse

Posted 27 April 2017 - 09:07 AM

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Yeah, like Phil said it's the same general mechanism as Chinook winds, it's just less pronounced and we don't have a common name for it for areas further east and far away from the Rockies.


Yes we do. The common name is Chinoook wind.

#108
Phil

Posted 27 April 2017 - 09:50 AM

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What's the point of this debate? The "Chinook wind" is mostly just a laymans term for warm wind, and the name actually originated from the PNW, not the Rocky Mountains. No need to debate the semantics of the word.

https://naldc.nal.us...096&content=PDF

It's just one word to describe a multitude of different meteorological process depending on the region it's occurring in:

The distribution of the Chinook is rather wide. It occurs most frequently in Washington, Oregon, Montana, Idaho, Wyoming, and the Dakotas, in the united States, and in the region immediately north in the British Possessions. There are authentic instances recorded of this wind in Nebraska, Iowa, Minnesota, and even Wisconsin.


That said, meteorologically speaking, the most pronounced "Chinook" warming observed has occurred over the Northern Plains, not the leeward side of the Rocky Mountains or the PNW:

http://www.blackhill...om/chinook.html
Personal Weather Station, Live Stream on Wunderground: https://www.wundergr...pwsdash#history

#109
Front Ranger

Posted 27 April 2017 - 11:15 AM

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Yes we do. The common name is Chinoook wind.

 

If you're so adamant about it, feel free to provide a source that references Chinook winds 500+ mi from the Rockies.


Cool anomalies soothe the soul.


#110
Front Ranger

Posted 27 April 2017 - 11:21 AM

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What's the point of this debate? The "Chinook wind" is mostly just a laymans term for warm wind, and the name actually originated from the PNW, not the Rocky Mountains. No need to debate the semantics of the word.

https://naldc.nal.us...096&content=PDF

It's just one word to describe a multitude of different meteorological process depending on the region it's occurring in:


That said, meteorologically speaking, the most pronounced "Chinook" warming observed has occurred over the Northern Plains, not the leeward side of the Rocky Mountains or the PNW:

http://www.blackhill...om/chinook.html

 

It's not a big deal. But virtually every source I've seen online has talked about Chinook winds occurring on the lee side of mountains, specifically near the Rockies in wide reference. This is always how I've heard the term used. As someone who personally experiences these winds all the time, perhaps it stood out to me more than others who do not. 

 

Phil, I know you have personally very specifically defined terms like "derecho" before. And Jesse, you might notice and care if someone used the term "convergence zone" to refer to what you would identify as a deformation zone. These things get discussed on here all the time.

 

Attached File  Screenshot_9.png   159.44KB   0 downloads


Cool anomalies soothe the soul.


#111
happ

Posted 27 April 2017 - 11:28 AM

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It's not a big deal. But virtually every source I've seen online has talked about Chinook winds occurring on the lee side of mountains, specifically near the Rockies in wide reference. This is always how I've heard the term used. As someone who personally experiences these winds all the time, perhaps it stood out to me more than others who do not. 

 

Phil, I know you have personally very specifically defined terms like "derecho" before. And Jesse, you might care notice it if someone used the term "convergence zone" to refer to what you would identify as a deformation zone. These things get discussed on here all the time.

 

attachicon.gifScreenshot_9.png

 

The general idea of Chinook winds are as you say.



#112
Phil

Posted 27 April 2017 - 11:37 AM

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Chinook winds are still Chinook winds when they're blowing across the Northern Plains. The term "Chinook" a reference to a source region, nothing more, nothing less.

The level of stupidiot it takes to misunderstand that reference is beyond anything that should exist on a freaking weather forum.
Personal Weather Station, Live Stream on Wunderground: https://www.wundergr...pwsdash#history

#113
Front Ranger

Posted 27 April 2017 - 11:41 AM

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Chinook winds are still Chinook winds when they're blowing across the Northern Plains. The term "Chinook" a reference to a source region, nothing more, nothing less.

You have to be a complete blowhard to misunderstand the reference.

 

1. Again, if you look up the term anywhere, it's almost always associated with mountains. I'm aware the name comes from the source region, I made that point in my first post about it.

 

2. When in doubt, resort to ad hominen! I do find the "blowhard" insult a bit humorous in this context, though.  ;)


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Cool anomalies soothe the soul.


#114
Phil

Posted 27 April 2017 - 11:49 AM

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1. Again, if you look up the term anywhere, it's almost always associated with mountains. I'm aware the name comes from the source region, I made that point in my first post about it.

2. When in doubt, resort to ad hominen! I do find the "blowhard" insult a bit humorous in this context, though. ;)


They're *associated* with mountains, but not *confined* to mountains, because the winds and their effects are strongest in the valleys *downwind* of the mountains. They're still called "chinook winds".

Get it?
Personal Weather Station, Live Stream on Wunderground: https://www.wundergr...pwsdash#history

#115
Phil

Posted 27 April 2017 - 12:04 PM

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From the National Weather Service, of Rapid City, SD:

https://www.weather.gov/unr/1943-01-22

The Black Hills area can experience spectacular temperature variations. Day-to-day changes occur as cold and warm fronts cross the northern Plains. However, temperature ranges across the area at a given time can be just as great. They happen rapidly as the wind direction changes, most notably the warming Chinook winds that have given the Black Hills the reputation as the “Banana Belt” of the Midwest. Other temperature differences are caused by inversions, when warm air flows over a shallow pool of cold air. Because the Black Hills rise above the plains like an island in a body of water, they are in the warm air layer....

......In Spearfish, the temperature rose from -4 at 7:32 a.m. to 45 degrees–a rise of 49 degrees—in just two minutes. A couple of hours later, it plunged from 54 back to -4 degrees–a change of 58 degrees in 27 minutes. In downtown Rapid City, the temperature had warmed to +5 degrees by 9:20 a.m., then it quickly warmed to 54 degrees by 9:40 am—a difference of 49 degrees in 20 minutes. The drastic temperature changes were logged on recording thermometers at the Montana-Dakota Utilities Company offices in both downtown Rapid City (then at 725 St. Joseph Street) and Spearfish.

The change in temperature was noticeable as people rounded street corners. Motorists were unable to see out their windshields when thick frost forms as they encountered the front and plate glass windows cracked. This event, which the Rapid City Daily Journal described as “crazily deviating temperatures” and “freakish warmth”, received national media coverage. It was featured in “Ripley’s Believe it or Not” and “Strange as it Seems” cartoons printed in newspapers across the country.

A detailed description of the event was written by Roland R. Hamann, Senior Observer with the U.S. Weather Bureau office (now National Weather Service) at Rapid City, South Dakota and published in the March 1943 Monthly Weather Review as “The Remarkable Temperature Fluctuations in the Black Hills Region January 1943” available at https://docs.lib.noa...071-03-0029.pdf


Personal Weather Station, Live Stream on Wunderground: https://www.wundergr...pwsdash#history

#116
Front Ranger

Posted 27 April 2017 - 12:05 PM

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They're *associated* with mountains, but not *confined* to mountains, because the winds and their effects are strongest in the valleys *downwind* of the mountains. They're still called "chinook winds".

Get it?


Hey, like I said, feel free to point to a source calling winds 500+ mi *downwind* from mountains "Chinooks".

I already agreed with you that the warming effect can occur (though to a lesser degree usually) far from mountains on the plains as the dry air continues to sink with the elevation.

But Chinook primarily refers to a downslope effect enhanced by mountains or hills. Which is why if you Google "Chinook winds", the main places talked about are Calgary, Great Falls, Cheyenne, Denver, etc.

Cool anomalies soothe the soul.


#117
Front Ranger

Posted 27 April 2017 - 12:09 PM

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From the National Weather Service, of Rapid City, SD:

https://www.weather.gov/unr/1943-01-22


Yep, the "hills" part of the Black Hills just might play a role. Those hills are not small, either.

Just look where Spearfish and Rapid City are. Right by those hills.

Cool anomalies soothe the soul.


#118
Phil

Posted 27 April 2017 - 12:10 PM

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Summary of a historic Chinook event Rapid City, SD:

https://docs.lib.noa...071-03-0029.pdf

This region is habitually subject to surprising temper-
ature changes. Indeed, the chinook is so prevalent that
it may be considered a prominent climatological factor.

Some of the outstanding temperature changes contained
in the Rapid City record are as follows: The greatest
daily range at Rapid City was observed on January 13,
1913, when the temperature rose from -17' at 8 a.m. to
47' above zero at 10 p-m., a rise of 64' in 14 hours.


Personal Weather Station, Live Stream on Wunderground: https://www.wundergr...pwsdash#history

#119
Phil

Posted 27 April 2017 - 12:13 PM

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Similar effects are felt through the Midwest as a result of the Chinooks:

The distribution of the Chinook is rather wide. It occurs most frequently in Washington, Oregon, Montana, Idaho, Wyoming, and the Dakotas, in the united States, and in the region immediately north in the British Possessions. There are authentic instances recorded of this wind in Nebraska, Iowa, Minnesota, and even Wisconsin.


Adiabatic heating/drying on the leeward side of mountainous terrain does create the Chinook, however the winds continue well downstream from the mountains, and they're still referred to as "Chinook winds" for obvious reasons.
Personal Weather Station, Live Stream on Wunderground: https://www.wundergr...pwsdash#history

#120
Front Ranger

Posted 27 April 2017 - 01:12 PM

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Similar effects are felt through the Midwest as a result of the Chinooks:


Adiabatic heating/drying on the leeward side of mountainous terrain does create the Chinook, however the winds continue well downstream from the mountains, and they're still referred to as "Chinook winds" for obvious reasons.

 

What's the source for that? That's the first time I've seen anywhere talk about Chinook winds in the Midwest. Like I said before, I wasn't ruling it out, I was mainly asking the question because that's the not the normal region where Chinook winds are known to occur.


Cool anomalies soothe the soul.


#121
Phil

Posted 27 April 2017 - 02:04 PM

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What's the source for that? That's the first time I've seen anywhere talk about Chinook winds in the Midwest. Like I said before, I wasn't ruling it out, I was mainly asking the question because that's the not the normal region where Chinook winds are known to occur.


They're less common west of the Dakotas, but still occur on an infrequent basis.

https://www.revolvy....item_type=topic

https://docs.lib.noa...071-03-0029.pdf

https://naldc.nal.us...096&content=PDF

Example: DC isn't located in the mountains, but we still experience a chinook-type effect here when winds are W/NW, and it's responsible for some of our most ferocious winter windstorms.

Cold air advection from the W/NW occurs aloft while adiabatic downslope warming occurs within the lower boundary layer leeward of the Appalachians. The result is an extremely deep mixing layer and instability which mixes down the strong winds aloft..often between 60-80mph west of the Fall Line.

As recently as mid-February, hurricane force gusts occurred through much of the DC area thanks to this phenomenon,
Personal Weather Station, Live Stream on Wunderground: https://www.wundergr...pwsdash#history

#122
Front Ranger

Posted 27 April 2017 - 03:02 PM

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They're less common west of the Dakotas, but still occur on an infrequent basis.

https://www.revolvy....item_type=topic

https://docs.lib.noa...071-03-0029.pdf

https://naldc.nal.us...096&content=PDF

Example: DC isn't located in the mountains, but we still experience a chinook-type effect here when winds are W/NW, and it's responsible for some of our most ferocious winter windstorms.

Cold air advection from the W/NW occurs aloft while adiabatic downslope warming occurs within the lower boundary layer leeward of the Appalachians. The result is an extremely deep mixing layer and instability which mixes down the strong winds aloft..often between 60-80mph west of the Fall Line.

As recently as mid-February, hurricane force gusts occurred through much of the DC area thanks to this phenomenon,

 

Yeah, here we get two types of major downslope winds: Chinook (warm) and Bora (cold). The difference is mainly the source region and direction of the storm, as Bora winds are associated with Arctic air passage from the N/NW, while Chinook winds occur ahead of Pacific storms moving in from the W/SW.

 

https://www.nps.gov/romo/winds.htm

 

Here's an article about a Bora storm than brought 100+ mph gusts to the area last winter: http://denver.cbsloc...s-over-100-mph/


Cool anomalies soothe the soul.


#123
Jesse

Posted 27 April 2017 - 03:50 PM

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They're *associated* with mountains, but not *confined* to mountains, because the winds and their effects are strongest in the valleys *downwind* of the mountains. They're still called "chinook winds".

Get it?


This. Thank you.

Flatiron will literally go around in circles all day with this of stuff, though. Debating small details and nitpicking technicalities. It's like the dude has no life.
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#124
Jesse

Posted 27 April 2017 - 03:55 PM

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If you're so adamant about it, feel free to provide a source that references Chinook winds 500+ mi from the Rockies.


I was going to point out the occurences in the upper Midwest (Wisconsin) but it looks like Phil beat me to it.

#125
Front Ranger

Posted 27 April 2017 - 03:59 PM

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This. Thank you.

Flatiron will literally go around in circles all day with this of stuff, though. Debating small details and nitpicking technicalities. It's like the dude has no life.


We already moved on. You should, too.

And take a lesson from how this most recent conversation went with literally everyone but yourself. Even Phil, who's not known to be the most reasonable and civil poster here.

Cool anomalies soothe the soul.


#126
Jesse

Posted 27 April 2017 - 04:03 PM

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We already moved on. You should, too.

And take a lesson from how this most recent conversation went with literally everyone but yourself.


You seem butthurt. You need to get better at admitting to when you are wrong. :)
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#127
Front Ranger

Posted 27 April 2017 - 04:08 PM

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You seem butthurt. You need to get better at admitting to when you are wrong. :)


I was able to have a civil conversation with everyone involved. You're the only one still trying to make this personal.

That, my friend, is the definition of butt hurt. Literally no one else here struggles having a discussion with me the way you do. Can you admit you might have something to do with that? :)

Cool anomalies soothe the soul.


#128
Jesse

Posted 27 April 2017 - 04:11 PM

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I was able to have a civil conversation with everyone involved. You're the only one still trying to make this personal.

That, my friend, is the definition of butt hurt. Literally no one else here struggles having a discussion with me the way you do. Can you admit you might have something to do with that? :)


Um, yeah, no. You frustrate others with your antics as well.

Wasn't Phil commenting on the level of "stupididiot" it takes to be so obtuse about something just a few posts ago? That's actually more personal than I have gotten this entire discussion.

#129
Front Ranger

Posted 27 April 2017 - 04:24 PM

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Um, yeah, no. You frustrate others with your antics as well.

Wasn't Phil commenting on the level of "stupididiot" it takes to be so obtuse about something just a few posts ago? That's actually more personal than I have gotten this entire discussion.


Considering you show very little give and take, refuse to acknowledge valid points, and won't shoulder your own responsibility in unproductive discussions, you're not the person to be advising me to "admit when I'm wrong". In this very conversation, in fact, I acknowledged other points and made concessions. You've demonstrated no ability to do even that.

Moving on!

Cool anomalies soothe the soul.


#130
Jesse

Posted 27 April 2017 - 04:27 PM

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Considering you show very little give and take, refuse to acknowledge valid points, and won't shoulder your own responsibility in unproductive discussions, you're not the person to be advising me to "admit when I'm wrong". In this very conversation, in fact, I acknowledged other points and made concessions. You've demonstrated no ability to do even that.

Moving on!

 

None of this has anything to do with the discussion, or what we were talking about mere minutes ago. You are just rambling.



#131
Front Ranger

Posted 27 April 2017 - 04:37 PM

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None of this has anything to do with the discussion, or what we were talking about mere minutes ago. You are just rambling.

 

Phil was able to actually engage in conversation, despite resorting to ad hominem occasionally. He also provided evidence when asked, something you have rarely been able or willing to do. That's why the conversation between Phil and I went better.

 

You told me to "admit when I was wrong". Consider the source and consider the above. It had everything to do with this discussion and why you felt the need to jump back in and attack me this afternoon.


Cool anomalies soothe the soul.


#132
Front Ranger

Posted 27 April 2017 - 04:42 PM

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Jesse, if you're so adamant about me admitting I'm wrong, feel free to point to where I said Chinook winds can't occur in the Midwest.

 

Oh, that's right. You don't do evidence.   <_<


Cool anomalies soothe the soul.


#133
Jesse

Posted 27 April 2017 - 04:47 PM

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Jesse, if you're so adamant about me admitting I'm wrong, feel free to point to where I said Chinook winds can't occur in the Midwest.

 

Oh, that's right. You don't do evidence.   <_<

 

I just refuse to play your stupid games. You implied multiple times they were just associated with the Rocky Mountains. You know that, I know that. Why should I have to pull up a post?



#134
Jesse

Posted 27 April 2017 - 04:48 PM

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Phil was able to actually engage in conversation, despite resorting to ad hominem occasionally. He also provided evidence when asked, something you have rarely been able or willing to do. That's why the conversation between Phil and I went better.

 

You told me to "admit when I was wrong". Consider the source and consider the above. It had everything to do with this discussion and why you felt the need to jump back in and attack me this afternoon.

 

I have respectful conversations with many on here. I have little respect for you or your style, though. Especially your inability to admit when you're wrong, your tendency to attempt to squirm your way out of arguments, change what the original discussion was about after the fact, focus on small wording details rather than larger points, etc, etc, etc. It all just feels slimy to me. Like I've said before, look into politics.



#135
Front Ranger

Posted 27 April 2017 - 04:57 PM

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I just refuse to play your stupid games. You implied multiple times they were just associated with the Rocky Mountains. You know that, I know that. Why should I have to pull up a post?

 

It's not a game. It's holding your feet to the fire, and you don't like it. That's what this boils down to time and again.

 

You infer your own beefs with me (butt hurt) into these conversations, and then make them about trying to prove me wrong. Look how this started. I asked a question. I didn't make a definitive statement, I didn't say wxstatman was wrong, I simply said that in my experience, "chinook winds" was a term almost always associated with the lee side of mountain areas. That the common definition applied to those areas. 

 

Those are the facts. Stick to them. You're the one trying to play your own "gotcha" game here.


Cool anomalies soothe the soul.


#136
Front Ranger

Posted 27 April 2017 - 05:00 PM

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I have respectful conversations with many on here. I have little respect for you or your style, though. Especially your inability to admit when you're wrong, your tendency to attempt to squirm your way out of arguments, change what the original discussion was about after the fact, focus on small wording details rather than larger points, etc, etc, etc. It all just feels slimy to me. Like I've said before, look into politics.

 

Yes, and you use that excuse over and over for refusing to acknowledge valid points, provide evidence, or just have civil conversations that don't involve needless ad hominem. Again...a giant cop out. Like I've told you before, if you can't handle discussing things with me, then don't jump in.

 

Just look - once again you're making this discussion about me and how you feel about me, rather than the actual subject matter. Sorry amigo, that is squarely on you.


Cool anomalies soothe the soul.


#137
Jesse

Posted 27 April 2017 - 05:03 PM

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The level of delusion from some people is absolutely staggering. :rolleyes: I really hope others can see this.



#138
Front Ranger

Posted 27 April 2017 - 05:04 PM

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The level of delusion from some people is absolutely staggering. :rolleyes: I really hope others can see this.

 

More ad hominem. Avoiding actual discourse.


Cool anomalies soothe the soul.


#139
Jesse

Posted 27 April 2017 - 05:11 PM

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More ad hominem. Avoiding actual discourse.

 

As Mark Twain once said, "Never argue with a fool. Onlookers may not be able to tell the difference." :)



#140
Front Ranger

Posted 27 April 2017 - 05:22 PM

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As Mark Twain once said, "Never argue with a fool. Onlookers may not be able to tell the difference." :)

 

More ad hominem. Avoiding actual discourse.

 

As another wise man once said: "Can't handle the heat, don't put your hands in the flames."


Cool anomalies soothe the soul.


#141
Jesse

Posted 27 April 2017 - 06:54 PM

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More ad hominem. Avoiding actual discourse.

As another wise man once said: "Can't handle the heat, don't put your hands in the flames."


No I get the last word!

#142
SilverFallsAndrew

Posted 27 April 2017 - 07:57 PM

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Up here probably 4-5 90+ days on average would be my guess. 

 

Maybe less....Given 2014 did not have a 90+ day at Silver Falls....

 

2015 had 7 90+ days. 


Snowfall

2017-18: 30.3"

2016-17: 49.2"

2015-16: 11.75"

2014-15: 3.5"
2013-14: 11.75"
2012-13: 16.75"
2011-12: 98.5"

 

It's always sunny at Winters Hill! 

 


#143
SilverFallsAndrew

Posted 27 April 2017 - 07:59 PM

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It hit 95 at my house in late July 2015. I think SLE was like 104 that day. 


Snowfall

2017-18: 30.3"

2016-17: 49.2"

2015-16: 11.75"

2014-15: 3.5"
2013-14: 11.75"
2012-13: 16.75"
2011-12: 98.5"

 

It's always sunny at Winters Hill! 

 


#144
wx_statman

Posted 27 April 2017 - 09:48 PM

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Yeah, like Phil said it's the same general mechanism as Chinook winds, it's just less pronounced and we don't have a common name for it for areas further east and far away from the Rockies.

 

FWIW, the NWS called it a Chinook -

 

http://www.weather.g..._History_Feb_21


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#145
wx_statman

Posted 27 April 2017 - 09:51 PM

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Here's a day from a couple winters ago where Boulder went from 7 degrees at 7 am to 54 at noon, a rise of 47 degrees in 5 hours: https://www.wundergr...ilyHistory.html

 

That's a weird one. The warmup happened on an east wind. I wouldn't have expected that...



#146
wx_statman

Posted 27 April 2017 - 09:59 PM

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Wow, a lot of Chinook talk today!  :lol:



#147
Front Ranger

Posted 28 April 2017 - 08:19 AM

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That's a weird one. The warmup happened on an east wind. I wouldn't have expected that...

 

I thought the same thing. I'm guessing the lower level wind was easterly, but probably westerly higher up.


Cool anomalies soothe the soul.


#148
Front Ranger

Posted 28 April 2017 - 08:21 AM

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FWIW, the NWS called it a Chinook -

 

http://www.weather.g..._History_Feb_21

 

Fair enough! I've learned something new...seems that Chinook winds can occur way east of the mountains, they're just a lot more common near mountains.


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Cool anomalies soothe the soul.


#149
IbrChris

Posted 28 April 2017 - 01:03 PM

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Proper term for a wind that warms adiabatically as it descends is a "foehn" wind. Whether in the lee of the Rockies, the Andes, the Alps etc.

https://en.wikipedia...wiki/Foehn_wind


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The Pacific Northwest: Where storms go to die.


#150
happ

Posted 28 April 2017 - 01:12 PM

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Proper term for a wind that warms adiabatically as it descends is a "foehn" wind. Whether in the lee of the Rockies, the Andes, the Alps etc.

https://en.wikipedia...wiki/Foehn_wind

 

Similar to katabatic winds [ie santa ana] https://en.wikipedia.../Katabatic_wind


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