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On This Day In History...Major Weather Events in the PNW or West

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#951
Front Ranger

Posted 19 February 2019 - 05:22 PM

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I remember we went into a dry cool pattern afterwards so the snow stuck around in the shade for quite a while. It was a great capstone to what was easily the best winter of my childhood in the Willamette Valley.

 

I didn't experience the storm living up in Tacoma, but I remember going down to visiting my grandparents in Cottage Grove a week or so after it happened and there being snow in the shade.


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#952
Deweydog

Posted 19 February 2019 - 05:38 PM

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I didn't experience the storm living up in Tacoma, but I remember going down to visiting my grandparents in Cottage Grove a week or so after it happened and there being snow in the shade.


It probably came from that storm.

All roads lead to Walgreens.  


#953
BLI snowman

Posted 20 February 2019 - 01:33 PM

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Solid contender for greatest snowstorm in regional history between February 18-19, 1884.

 

After a two week cold spell, a major system moved in off the coast and moved north up through the region while dropping tons of wet snow in its wake.

 

In the Willamette Valley on the 18th, the Oregonian reported 11 inches at Junction City, 24 inches at Corvallis, 20 inches at Halsey,  16 inches at Albany, 12 inches at Salem, and 16 inches in McMinnville. In Portland, about a foot fell with this storm with the paper reporting snowfall rates of 1.5" per hour throughout much of the morning of the 19th. The snow was so wet in town that the paper reported roofs caving in. By the evening the wind switched to the south and the entirety of Western OR was in the 40s.

 

The storm continued to spread northward , dropping 12"+ at Olympia and a reported 18 inches fell in downtown Seattle between the 18th and 19th. Downtown Seattle looked like this on the 19th before warming into the 40s

 

Attached File  x17-1884-snow-p-square1.jpg   72.52KB   0 downloads

 

 

It appears this initial storm cut off somewhere to the north of Seattle, with Langley, B.C. reporting an overrunning total of 7" on the 21st with what was likely a 2nd storm.

 

However, it is definitely one of the only individual events that I'm aware of to drop 10"+ essentially from Eugene to Everett. Certainly no 21st century precedent for it.


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#954
wx_statman

Posted 20 February 2019 - 01:46 PM

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Solid contender for greatest snowstorm in regional history between February 18-19, 1884.

 

After a two week cold spell, a major system moved in off the coast and moved north up through the region while dropping tons of wet snow in its wake.

 

In the Willamette Valley on the 18th, the Oregonian reported 11 inches at Junction City, 24 inches at Corvallis, 20 inches at Halsey,  16 inches at Albany, 12 inches at Salem, and 16 inches in McMinnville. In Portland, about a foot fell with this storm with the paper reporting snowfall rates of 1.5" per hour throughout much of the morning of the 19th. The snow was so wet in town that the paper reported roofs caving in. By the evening the wind switched to the south and the entirety of Western OR was in the 40s.

 

The storm continued to spread northward , dropping 12"+ at Olympia and a reported 18 inches fell in downtown Seattle between the 18th and 19th. Downtown Seattle looked like this on the 19th before warming into the 40s

 

attachicon.gifx17-1884-snow-p-square1.jpg

 

 

It appears this initial storm cut off somewhere to the north of Seattle, with Langley, B.C. reporting an overrunning total of 7" on the 21st with what was likely a 2nd storm.

 

However, it is definitely one of the only individual events that I'm aware of to drop 10"+ essentially from Eugene to Everett. Certainly no 21st century precedent for it.

 

Pretty epic flood in the Los Angeles basin during the same time period. One of the more dynamic stretches along the west coast in history.



#955
BLI snowman

Posted 20 February 2019 - 01:49 PM

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Pretty epic flood in the Los Angeles basin during the same time period. One of the more dynamic stretches along the west coast in history.

 

Not just the West Coast, either. The SE ridge pumped up from that PNW trough produced one of the most significant tornado outbreaks on record that week

 

https://en.wikipedia...ornado_outbreak



#956
wx_statman

Posted 20 February 2019 - 02:01 PM

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Not just the West Coast, either. The SE ridge pumped up from that PNW trough produced one of the most significant tornado outbreaks on record that week

 

https://en.wikipedia...ornado_outbreak

 

Wow, no kidding. I hadn't heard of that one before. That came after the big January cold wave back east, including still standing all-time records of -30 in Des Moines and -22 in St. Louis (not to mention a reported -40 in Rockford, IL, lower than the current state record). This was also the first winter after Krakatoa.



#957
BLI snowman

Posted 20 February 2019 - 02:09 PM

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Wow, no kidding. I hadn't heard of that one before. That came after the big January cold wave back east, including still standing all-time records of -30 in Des Moines and -22 in St. Louis (not to mention a reported -40 in Rockford, IL, lower than the current state record). This was also the first winter after Krakatoa.

 

Yeah, the 1880s were a pretty remarkable stretch for winter weather. That 1883-84 progression is rather similar to this winter.



#958
wx_statman

Posted 20 February 2019 - 09:37 PM

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Yeah, the 1880s were a pretty remarkable stretch for winter weather. That 1883-84 progression is rather similar to this winter.

 

Its kind of a watered down version, for sure. So. California had that rainstorm late last week too, with some all-time precip records challenged. 



#959
snow_wizard

Posted 20 February 2019 - 09:55 PM

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That is one of the best snowfall pictures for Seattle in the 19th century.  What an amazing year 1884 was!  Epic February and epic December.  Both still stand as the gold standard for those months.  Krakatoa could have certainly been repsponsible. 


Death To Warm Anomalies!

 

Winter 2018-19 stats

 

Total Snowfall = 12.4"

Day with 1" or more snow depth = 12

Total Hail = 0.3"

Coldest Low = 13

Lows 32 or below = 63

Highs 32 or below = 1

Lows 20 or below = 6

Highs 40 or below = 15

 

 


#960
SilverFallsAndrew

Posted 05 March 2019 - 07:32 AM

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On this date in 1955 Silver Falls scored their all-time March record low with a low of 10.


Snowfall

2018-19: 63.5"

2017-18: 30.3"

2016-17: 49.2"

2015-16: 11.75"

2014-15: 3.5"
2013-14: 11.75"
2012-13: 16.75"
2011-12: 98.5"

 

It's always sunny at Winters Hill! 

 


#961
Timmy_Supercell

Posted 13 March 2019 - 11:15 AM

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Squall line thunderstorm developed in 2011 today. This line extended from as far north as NW Oregon coast all the way south to near the NWS Eureka office. The squall was detected on all 3 of these doppler radars.

 

In southern Oregon there were a few isolated locations that received a severe t'storm, such as Merlin having golfball sized hail and Roseburg had a 60mph wind. Some outflow winds 55-60mph reached as far as the east slopes of the cascades, though the storm line itself was breaking apart over the hills. Even some of the offshore waters had some triggered Special Marine Warnings for winds well over 70mph. This storm effected quite a large area and held its form for several hours.

 

Locally I didn't have any thunder in Klamath Falls but still had high outflow winds and saw quite a dark sky to my west.

Another squall on January 19th 2016 actually reached K-Falls producing lightning, hail and a 67mph gust however that was a much more localized squall in comparison to the 2011 event. 


Weather Data for Klamath Falls, OR

-------------------------------------------------------------------

Snowfall (with % of seasonal average)

 

2010-2011 - 58.20" (161%)
2011-2012 - 49.00" (136%)
2012-2013 - 16.70" (46%)
2013-2014 - 9.05" (25%)
2014-2015 - 2.90" (8%)
2015-2016 - 54.45" (151%)
2016-2017 - 63.00" (175%)
2017-2018 - 18.10" (50%)
 
2018-2019 - 52.00" (145%)
 
Nov '18 - 00.20" (5%)
Dec '18 - 05.80" (58%)
Jan '19 - 09.50(80%)
Feb '19 - 27.50" (306%)
Mar '19 - 09.00" (360%)
Apr '19 - T"
 
2019 Thunderstorms: 1
04/02 - Vicinity
04/19 - TSTM
 
Top 5 Daily Snows: 12.40" (01/03/2017), 8.20" (11/23/2010), 7.50" (12/13/2015), 6.60" (02/07/2017), 6.20" (03/10/2019)
Honorable Mention: 6.00" (03/20/2012), 6.00" (02/28/2012), 5.70" (12/14/2016), 5.50" (01/18/2012)
Max Depths: 21.00" (01/07/2017), 18.00" (12/24/2015), 11.00" (11/23/2010), 9.00" (02/28/2012), 8.00" (01/01/2011)
 
T'storm Days: 2 (2019), 16 (2018), 11 (2017), 12 (2016), 20 (2015), 21 (2014), 16 (2013), 2 (2012), 12 (2011) / 1980-2015 Avg = 12 T'storm Days
Severe T'storms: 4 (08/08/2017), (07/24/2017), (01/19/2016), (08/05/2012) 
"Almost" Severe - (08/10/2017), (05/04/2016)
Vicinity Severe T'storms (close enough to hear, with official severe reports)
(06/26/2017), (08/05/2016), (07/09/2015), (07/05/2015), (06/09/2015), (08/05/2014), (08/04/2014), (08/22/2013), (08/12/2013), (09/12/2011), (09/04/2011)

 


#962
Reg1992

Posted 04 April 2019 - 02:44 PM

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Its kind of a watered down version, for sure. So. California had that rainstorm late last week too, with some all-time precip records challenged. 

 

1883-84 was the wettest rainy season in San Diego's recorded history (25.90") and Downtown Los Angeles's history (38.18").



My personal weather station: Davis Instruments Vantage Pro 2

 

2018-2019 Season Total: 14.77" (as of 4/16/19)


2017-2018 Season Total: 4.63"

2016-2017 Season Total: 15.18"

2015-2016 Season Total: 8.12"

 

California Water Year/Rainy Season measuring period runs from July 1 to June 30.
 

 

 


#963
Mr Marine Layer

Posted 04 April 2019 - 03:17 PM

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Not weather-related, but on this day one year ago walking from the bus stop to my work, I was trying to make it across the street before the walk time ran out. Someone ahead of me had pushed the button. Note that you can wait up for a ridiculous 2 minutes for the next walk signal in crowded Southern California. So I ran as fast as I could and fell half way across the street, cutting open my chin and banging my knee really bad. I needed 5 stitches in my chin. The worst thing, however, was breaking my new smartphone I had bought just a few days earlier.

 

It was not rainy that morning like it was today.