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From Philadelphia to Seattle - Cheer me up.

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#1
iFred

Posted 14 March 2018 - 07:05 AM

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I am moving back to the Seattle area as soon as this fall. It seems that when I moved to Philly in 2015, I was coming in during what would be three warm or dry winters in a row, missing out on any significant "Northeast Winters".

 

So what are some things about living between Portland and Vancouver, BC, that you look forward to in the weather?

 

Windstorms?

Extreme rain events?

Ice?

 


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#2
Phil

Posted 14 March 2018 - 08:01 AM

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I am moving back to the Seattle area as soon as this fall. It seems that when I moved to Philly in 2015, I was coming in during what would be three warm or dry winters in a row, missing out on any significant "Northeast Winters".

So what are some things about living between Portland and Vancouver, BC, that you look forward to in the weather?

Windstorms?
Extreme rain events?
Ice?


No swamp summers, low sun angles, and drizzle? ;)

You need to experience a real tropical cyclone before you depart. Hopefully we get one this year.
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#3
BLI snowman

Posted 14 March 2018 - 08:15 AM

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You're often 45-60 minutes away from twice as much snow as you will ever see in Philadelphia.


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#4
Front Ranger

Posted 14 March 2018 - 09:05 AM

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Historically, Philly doesn't average that much more snow than many PNW lowland locations (15"/winter). So while it may feel like you "missed out", you really only missed out on getting one of their extreme winters. What you experienced was closer to normal, at least as far as snowfall.


Cool anomalies soothe the soul.


#5
Phil

Posted 14 March 2018 - 11:49 AM

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Historically, Philly doesn't average that much more snow than many PNW lowland locations (15"/winter). So while it may feel like you "missed out", you really only missed out on getting one of their extreme winters. What you experienced was closer to normal, at least as far as snowfall.


IIRC he lives in Lansdale, which averages ~ 30”/yr. That’s much higher than anything you’ll see in the PNW lowlands. For the region as a whole, the last few years have been mostly below average for snowfall, which isn’t statistically surprising given 2013/14 and 2014/15.

And forget about big storms dumping 2-3 feet. When was the last time SEA had a double-digit snowfall total?
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#6
Front Ranger

Posted 14 March 2018 - 12:03 PM

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I think he lives in Lansdale, which averages ~ 30”/yr. You won’t find anything like that in the PNW lowlands. For the region as a whole, the last few years have been mostly below average for snowfall, which isn’t statistically surprising given 2013/14 and 2014/15.

And forget about big storms dumping 2-3 feet. When was the last time SEA had a double-digit snowfall total?

 

I think our own Shawnigan Lake poster averages close to that. 

 

Either way, the Philly number is what it is. Yeah, definitely more big storm potential (although the area has far outperformed historical norms in that respect the past couple decades), but as the long term average indicates, there have been many periods with snowfall similar to the past 3 winters there.


Cool anomalies soothe the soul.


#7
Phil

Posted 14 March 2018 - 12:16 PM

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I think our own Shawnigan Lake poster averages close to that.

Either way, the Philly number is what it is. Yeah, definitely more big storm potential (although the area has far outperformed historical norms in that respect the past couple decades), but as the long term average indicates, there have been many periods with snowfall similar to the past 3 winters there.


Average snowfall in Philadelphia is 21.8”. I’m not sure where you got 15”? Even BWI averages 20.1”. On the other hand, SEA averages 5.6”, and PDX averages 4”.

There’s just no legitimate comparison. Snowfall averages around Philly are ~ 250-300% of those in the PNW lowlands, generally speaking. I’m not trying to sound like an east coast homer, but the numbers don’t lie.
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#8
Front Ranger

Posted 14 March 2018 - 01:16 PM

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Average snowfall in Philadelphia is 21.8”. I’m not sure where you got 15”? Even BWI averages 20.1”. On the other hand, SEA averages 5.6”, and PDX averages 4”.

There’s just no legitimate comparison. Snowfall averages around Philly are ~ 250-300% of those in the PNW lowlands, generally speaking. I’m not trying to sound like an east coast homer, but the numbers don’t lie.

 

What period of record are you looking at? SEA's long term average is 11.7" https://wrcc.dri.edu...iMAIN.pl?wa7473

 

PDX is 6.6": https://wrcc.dri.edu...iMAIN.pl?or6751


Cool anomalies soothe the soul.


#9
Deweydog

Posted 14 March 2018 - 01:23 PM

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I am moving back to the Seattle area as soon as this fall. It seems that when I moved to Philly in 2015, I was coming in during what would be three warm or dry winters in a row, missing out on any significant "Northeast Winters".

So what are some things about living between Portland and Vancouver, BC, that you look forward to in the weather?

Windstorms?
Extreme rain events?
Ice?


Didn't you live here for several years?

I suspect it will be very similar overall, only colder and snowier.

All roads lead to Walgreens.  


#10
Jesse

Posted 14 March 2018 - 03:14 PM

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Didn't you live here for several years?

I suspect it will be very similar overall, maybe slightly warmer.


Don’t forget, we are progged to embark upon a 1950s redux starting in 2020 +/- 70 years.
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#11
Deweydog

Posted 14 March 2018 - 03:35 PM

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Don’t forget, we are progged to embark upon a 1950s redux starting in 2020 +/- 70 years.


Fixed!

All roads lead to Walgreens.  


#12
Jesse

Posted 14 March 2018 - 03:57 PM

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Fix ed!


Broken!

#13
Phil

Posted 14 March 2018 - 04:54 PM

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What period of record are you looking at? SEA's long term average is 11.7" https://wrcc.dri.edu...iMAIN.pl?wa7473

PDX is 6.6": https://wrcc.dri.edu...iMAIN.pl?or6751


Uh, that would be 1981-2010. You know, the official climatology period. Philadelphia’s “long term” snowfall average is also higher, but that’s not exactly applicable nowadays.

What happened at the tail end of the LIA obviously isn’t relevant in today’s climatological tendencies.
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#14
Phil

Posted 14 March 2018 - 05:00 PM

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Don’t forget, we are progged to embark upon a 1950s redux starting in 2020 +/- 70 years.


Didn’t you guys just have a 1950’s-esque stretch of late season cold? What was it, the second longest stretch of sub-50 highs this late in the year? Or something involving something other than torching? Or something? 🤓
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#15
Front Ranger

Posted 14 March 2018 - 05:05 PM

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Uh, that would be 1981-2010. You know, the official climatology period. Philadelphia’s “long term” snowfall average is also higher, but that’s not exactly applicable nowadays.

What happened at the tail end of the LIA obviously isn’t relevant in today’s climatological tendencies.


I made it clear from the beginning I was talking about long term, historical averages.

SEA's POR starts at 1945...most would not consider that the tail end of the LIA.

Cool anomalies soothe the soul.


#16
Phil

Posted 14 March 2018 - 05:14 PM

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I made it clear from the beginning I was talking about long term, historical averages.

SEA's POR starts at 1945...most would not consider that the tail end of the LIA.


There’s a reason we use 1981-2010 for climatological averages. The climate system is far removed from its mid/late 20th century state of operation.

Using the 1945-present average at Philadelphia also increases the average to 28.9”, but again, that’s not exactly the fairest way to average it.

Regardless, there’s no legitimate comparison between Philadelphia and the PNW lowlands, as far as snowfall averages are concerned. If you wish to be academically honest about it.
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#17
snow_wizard

Posted 14 March 2018 - 05:14 PM

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What period of record are you looking at? SEA's long term average is 11.7" https://wrcc.dri.edu...iMAIN.pl?wa7473

 

PDX is 6.6": https://wrcc.dri.edu...iMAIN.pl?or6751

 

Indeed.  That absurdly low snowfall average people site for Seattle is bogus.  Many places away from the big cities get considerably more also.  There are places below 1000 feet that average 30+ a year like Palmer, Darrington, and small towns in the Skykomish River valley.


Death To Warm Anomalies!

 

Winter 2018-19 stats

 

Total Snowfall = 0.0"

Coldest Low = 26

Lows 32 or below = 13

Highs 32 or below = 0

Lows Below 20 = 0

Highs 40 or below = 0

 

 


#18
Phil

Posted 14 March 2018 - 05:22 PM

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Indeed. That absurdly low snowfall average people site for Seattle is bogus. Many places away from the big cities get considerably more also. There are places below 1000 feet that average 30+ a year like Palmer, Darrington, and small towns in the Skykomish River valley.


“Less than 1000ft”? That’s roughly analogous to our suburbs below the BR (~ 25-35 miles west of I95) that average 45”+ per winter. Skykomish is pretty freaking far outside Seattle.

Again, there’s just no honest comparison. Snowfall averages around Philly easily double, if not triple, those of the PNW lowlands.
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#19
Front Ranger

Posted 14 March 2018 - 05:29 PM

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Neither Philly or Seattle are very snowy cities. Philadelphia is snowier, but like Seattle, sees many winters with very little snowfall.

That's all I was saying.

Cool anomalies soothe the soul.


#20
Phil

Posted 14 March 2018 - 05:49 PM

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Neither Philly or Seattle are very snowy cities. Philadelphia is snowier, but like Seattle, sees many winters with very little snowfall.

That's all I was saying.


That’s one way to put it, I guess. It’s sort of subjective.

Seattle is to Philly, as Philly is to Chicago. Or Boston.
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#21
Jesse

Posted 14 March 2018 - 06:12 PM

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Didn’t you guys just have a 1950’s-esque stretch of late season cold? What was it, the second longest stretch of sub-50 highs this late in the year? Or something involving something other than torching? Or something? 🤓


It was nice. Then came SEA’s earliest high in the 70s on record.

I assumed our 1950s redux would last longer than two weeks! ;)
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#22
Front Ranger

Posted 14 March 2018 - 06:20 PM

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That’s one way to put it, I guess. It’s sort of subjective.

Seattle is to Philly, as Philly is to Chicago. Or Boston.

 

Sure. I mean, the big difference is Chicago or Boston rarely see winters with less than 20" of snow fall. Philly sees that about 50% of the time, and less than 10" about the same amount of the time they see 30"+. They only average two 3"+ snowfalls a winter, which is one more than SEA.

 

So it's not unusual to go three winters in Philly without seeing a blockbuster 30"+ winter or multiple major winter storms. While if that happened in Boston, it would be truly shocking and disappointing for any weenie.


Cool anomalies soothe the soul.


#23
snow_wizard

Posted 14 March 2018 - 06:21 PM

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“Less than 1000ft”? That’s roughly analogous to our suburbs below the BR (~ 25-35 miles west of I95) that average 45”+ per winter. Skykomish is pretty freaking far outside Seattle.

Again, there’s just no honest comparison. Snowfall averages around Philly easily double, if not triple, those of the PNW lowlands.

 

That's fine, but as I was saying it's very misleading to say SEA averages 5" a year.  Amazingly the Puget Sound region averaged around 25" per winter from 1880 - 1900.


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Death To Warm Anomalies!

 

Winter 2018-19 stats

 

Total Snowfall = 0.0"

Coldest Low = 26

Lows 32 or below = 13

Highs 32 or below = 0

Lows Below 20 = 0

Highs 40 or below = 0

 

 


#24
snow_wizard

Posted 14 March 2018 - 06:26 PM

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It was nice. Then came SEA’s earliest high in the 70s on record.

I assumed our 1950s redux would last longer than two weeks! ;)

 

That spike was actually kind of intriguing.  Seattle reached 81 on March 11, 1892.  Crazy stuff can happen in the spring.  I will never forget April 1984.  The last half of the month was much colder than the first half.  It reached into the 80s early on and then snowed a couple of weeks later.  Extreme variability is a cold phase thing.


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Death To Warm Anomalies!

 

Winter 2018-19 stats

 

Total Snowfall = 0.0"

Coldest Low = 26

Lows 32 or below = 13

Highs 32 or below = 0

Lows Below 20 = 0

Highs 40 or below = 0

 

 


#25
Phil

Posted 14 March 2018 - 07:07 PM

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Sure. I mean, the big difference is Chicago or Boston rarely see winters with less than 20" of snow fall. Philly sees that about 50% of the time, and less than 10" about the same amount of the time they see 30"+.


No, 30” winters are easily more common than 10” winters in the Philadelphia area. Especially when their entire period of record is concerned.

And Philadelphia has never had a “snowless” winter, while Seattle/Portland see them on a relatively frequent basis.

Edit: 1972/73 might have been snowless in Philly. I’ll have to go check. I know even DCA has never had a snowless winter (at least a trace every year).

They only average two 3"+ snowfalls a winter, which is one more than SEA.


Can you link me to this? It sounds like BS, given BWI and IAD would both have a higher frequency of 4”+ snowfalls than Philly would 3”+ snowfalls.

So it's not unusual to go three winters in Philly without seeing a blockbuster 30"+ winter or multiple major winter storms. While if that happened in Boston, it would be truly shocking and disappointing for any weenie.


No, but it would be unusual to go three winters without totaling at least 20”, while SEA/PDX rarely hit 20”.
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#26
Phil

Posted 14 March 2018 - 07:11 PM

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That's fine, but as I was saying it's very misleading to say SEA averages 5" a year. Amazingly the Puget Sound region averaged around 25" per winter from 1880 - 1900.


Well, unless SEA is the PNW version of DCA, I’m not sure how it’s misleading, since 1981-2010 is a 30yr period of record, and the average was 5.6” over that timeframe.

That could increase in the future, obviously.
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#27
Phil

Posted 14 March 2018 - 07:16 PM

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It was nice. Then came SEA’s earliest high in the 70s on record.

I assumed our 1950s redux would last longer than two weeks! ;)


Round two is coming! Should be Jesse/Jim-tastic. 🌧💨

Then comes another brief early-April torch. Then back to troughing in mid-April while the rest of the county torches.
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#28
Front Ranger

Posted 14 March 2018 - 07:16 PM

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No, 30” winters are easily more common than 10” winters in the Philadelphia area. Especially when their entire period of record is concerned.

And Philadelphia has never had a “snowless” winter, while Seattle/Portland see them on a relatively frequent basis.

Can you link me to this? It sounds like BS, given BWI and IAD would both have a higher frequency of 4”+ snowfalls than Philly would 3”+ snowfalls.

 

I don't make stuff up, man. Google "philadelphia snowfall statistics" and it's all right there in the first 2 or 3 results.

 

Philadelphia has had 25 30"+ winters. They've had 21 with less than 10". That's pretty close.

 

They also actually did have a completely snowless winter in 1972-73. Also less than 1" in 1997-98.


Cool anomalies soothe the soul.


#29
Frontal Snowsquall

Posted 14 March 2018 - 07:40 PM

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I am moving back to the Seattle area as soon as this fall. It seems that when I moved to Philly in 2015, I was coming in during what would be three warm or dry winters in a row, missing out on any significant "Northeast Winters".

So what are some things about living between Portland and Vancouver, BC, that you look forward to in the weather?

Windstorms?
Extreme rain events?
Ice?


Windstorms are always a possibility here from fall to spring but they are few and far between and don't really amount to much. I'm still waiting for another Columbus Day type windstorm or even a 1995 windstorm. That is something I want to experience again. Extreme rain events can happen but to get big time flooding like in 1996 you need lots of things to come together so it really doesn't happen often. Ice storms aren't usually bad here and only really happen near outflow areas. Snow storms and Arctic blast can happen almost every winter. We are still waiting for another January 1950 event here in the PNW. We are due so it could happen soon.
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#30
Jesse

Posted 14 March 2018 - 07:41 PM

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That spike was actually kind of intriguing. Seattle reached 81 on March 11, 1892. Crazy stuff can happen in the spring. I will never forget April 1984. The last half of the month was much colder than the first half. It reached into the 80s early on and then snowed a couple of weeks later. Extreme variability is a cold phase thing.


That 81 seems insane if true. Is that considered a legit reading?

PDX also had a rogue March 80 in 1947, on the 16th I believe. But that is the only one in the period of record, at least for the airport.

#31
Phil

Posted 14 March 2018 - 07:43 PM

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I don't make stuff up, man. Google "philadelphia snowfall statistics" and it's all right there in the first 2 or 3 results.


Apparently you’re using a bad source, hence your unwillingness to link the data.

From the Mt. Holly (Philly NWS) website:

https://www.weather....imate.html#ncdc

The average is actually higher than I thought.

Seasonal snowfall average for 1981-2010: 22.4”

- Average number of 3”+ snowfalls/yr: 4
- Average number of 4”+ snowfalls/yr: 2
- Average number of 6”+ snowfalls/yr: 1

PHL_Seasonal_Snowfall_since_1979.png

Philadelphia has had 25 30"+ winters. They've had 21 with less than 10". That's pretty close. They also actually did have a completely snowless winter in 1972-73. Also less than 1" in 1997-98.


That’s a relative return rate of 84%, or roughly 4/5. So certainly not half and half. And the frequency of snowless winters is maybe 1/300+.

If that isn’t enough, a seasonal total of 10” is truly pathetic for PHI, but almost double SEA’s 1981-2010 average.

Heck, 10” would actually be more than double PDX’s 1981-2010 average.
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#32
Phil

Posted 14 March 2018 - 07:50 PM

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So, my analogy is valid.

Just as Chicago rarely sees winters with total snowfall under 20” (while Philly sees them regularly), Philly rarely sees winters with total snowfall under 5” (while SEA/PDX see them regularly).

So yes, Seattle is to Philly, as Philly is to Chicago. It’s a perfectly reasonable analogy, sustained by the numbers.
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#33
Front Ranger

Posted 14 March 2018 - 08:00 PM

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That 81 seems insane if true. Is that considered a legit reading?

PDX also had a rogue March 80 in 1947, on the 16th I believe. But that is the only one in the period of record, at least for the airport.

 

There are a few 80+ readings throughout the Puget Region in March:

 

- 81 at Kent 3/29/2004

- 84 at Landsburg 3/18/1928

- 82 at Sedro Wooley 3/19/1928

- 80 at Bremerton 3/30/2004

- 81 at Clearbrook 3/22/1915

 

So it certainly appears possible, though that Seattle one would be among the earliest on record for sure.


Cool anomalies soothe the soul.


#34
Phil

Posted 14 March 2018 - 08:00 PM

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And I apologize if it sounds like I’m trolling the PNW in any way, shape, or form. That’s honestly not my intention here.
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#35
Front Ranger

Posted 14 March 2018 - 08:05 PM

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So, my analogy is valid.

Just as Chicago rarely sees winters with total snowfall under 20” (while Philly sees them regularly), Philly rarely sees winters with total snowfall under 5” (while SEA/PDX see them regularly).

So yes, Seattle is to Philly, as Philly is to Chicago. It’s a perfectly reasonable analogy, sustained by the numbers.

 

Never disagreed with that.  :)

 

Just pointed out that you're much more likely to go 3 winters in Philly without a seeing major snowfall than you are Boston or Chicago.

 

Historically, the big-time blockbusters that Philly has seen in recent years like 2013-14, 2010-11, and 2009-10 have been quite rare. 4 of their top 8 snowfall winters on record have come since 2002...it was a very snowy period, but that's not close to normal.


Cool anomalies soothe the soul.


#36
Phil

Posted 14 March 2018 - 08:19 PM

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Never disagreed with that. :)

Just pointed out that you're much more likely to go 3 winters in Philly without a seeing major snowfall than you are Boston or Chicago.

Historically, the big-time blockbusters that Philly has seen in recent years like 2013-14, 2010-11, and 2009-10 have been quite rare. 4 of their top 8 snowfall winters on record have come since 2002...it was a very snowy period, but that's not close to normal.


That’s obviously correct, but the 20th century was also a relatively crappy one for east coast blizzards. At least compared to the 17th-19th centuries.

The 21st century has reverted back into a 19th century style snowfall climatology so far. It’s not surprising, as there is evidence of a longer term, centennial scale periodicity in boreal winter NATL storm track, which might have completed a half-cycle in the mid-20th century (in which case it would now be reversing phase).

These “blockbuster” style winters were commonplace during the 1600s/1700s, much more-so than they were in the 19th century, and more-so than they are now. So it’s all relative.
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#37
Front Ranger

Posted 14 March 2018 - 08:24 PM

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That’s obviously correct, but the 20th century was also a relatively crappy one for east coast blizzards. At least compared to the 17th-19th centuries.

The 21st century has reverted back into a 19th century style snowfall climatology so far. It’s not surprising, as there is evidence of a longer term, centennial scale periodicity in boreal winter NATL storm track, which might have completed a half-cycle in the mid-20th century (in which case it would now be reversing phase).

These “blockbuster” style winters were commonplace during the 1600s/1700s, much more-so than they were in the 19th century, and more-so than they are now. So it’s all relative.

 

Weren't you just saying we shouldn't be comparing to climate periods towards the end of the LIA?  

 

If you're going to dismiss PORs going back to the early 1900s/late 1800s, it really doesn't make much sense to bring up the 1600/1700s.  :P


Cool anomalies soothe the soul.


#38
Phil

Posted 14 March 2018 - 08:47 PM

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Weren't you just saying we shouldn't be comparing to climate periods towards the end of the LIA?

If you're going to dismiss PORs going back to the early 1900s/late 1800s, it really doesn't make much sense to bring up the 1600/1700s. :P


Except it wasn’t a comparison to SEA, it was merely an observation drawing context to the internal variability of Philadelphia’s snowfall climatology.

I never advocated including 19th century data in the averages for comparison elswhere, since there are still additional differences present in both climatology and seasonality.
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#39
snow_wizard

Posted 14 March 2018 - 08:51 PM

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Well, unless SEA is the PNW version of DCA, I’m not sure how it’s misleading, since 1981-2010 is a 30yr period of record, and the average was 5.6” over that timeframe.

That could increase in the future, obviously.

 

 

There were a number of years in that time frame that snowfall data wasn't kept.  If the years not recorded were figured in as zeroes that would be a big problem.  That having been said the recent average is terrible, but it's not representative of the climate overall.


Death To Warm Anomalies!

 

Winter 2018-19 stats

 

Total Snowfall = 0.0"

Coldest Low = 26

Lows 32 or below = 13

Highs 32 or below = 0

Lows Below 20 = 0

Highs 40 or below = 0

 

 


#40
snow_wizard

Posted 14 March 2018 - 08:59 PM

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There are a few 80+ readings throughout the Puget Region in March:

 

- 81 at Kent 3/29/2004

- 84 at Landsburg 3/18/1928

- 82 at Sedro Wooley 3/19/1928

- 80 at Bremerton 3/30/2004

- 81 at Clearbrook 3/22/1915

 

So it certainly appears possible, though that Seattle one would be among the earliest on record for sure.

 

Pretty intriguing years there...1915, 1928, and then the 1892 for Seattle.

 

At any rate I have no reason to doubt the 1892 reading for Seattle.  There are records for Seattle for part of 1890, most of 1891, most of 1892, and 1893.  The records indicate it reached 70 on March 10, 1892 so a freakish reading 11 degrees higher the next day seems reasonable for an early season heat spike.  Interestingly the 1890 - 1893 records for Seattle are unavailable online.  Nice to know there are still some things you can't get on the internet that do exist elsewhere.


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Death To Warm Anomalies!

 

Winter 2018-19 stats

 

Total Snowfall = 0.0"

Coldest Low = 26

Lows 32 or below = 13

Highs 32 or below = 0

Lows Below 20 = 0

Highs 40 or below = 0

 

 


#41
ShawniganLake

Posted 14 March 2018 - 09:12 PM

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I think our own Shawnigan Lake poster averages close to that.

Either way, the Philly number is what it is. Yeah, definitely more big storm potential (although the area has far outperformed historical norms in that respect the past couple decades), but as the long term average indicates, there have been many periods with snowfall similar to the past 3 winters there.

Yes. Average is 30” here. ~500ft elevation.

Edit. That is the 1981-2010 average. I believe the long term is higher.
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#42
Phil

Posted 14 March 2018 - 09:23 PM

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Yes. Average is 30” here. ~500ft elevation.

Edit. That is the 1981-2010 average. I believe the long term is higher.


What is your official station for climate records?
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#43
Phil

Posted 14 March 2018 - 09:30 PM

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There does appear to have been a regime shift back to snowier winters (IE: back to the climatology of the last 400yrs). The 20th century was exceptionally terrible/anomalous.

Lots of similar trendlines in stations that weren’t relocated.

bddouLv.gif

ZkKP8kQ.gif

9mNcdv5.gif

ZEHu5Lj.gif

ubCPA4E.gif

EONAtvF.gif
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#44
ShawniganLake

Posted 14 March 2018 - 09:44 PM

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What is your official station for climate records?

Shawnigan Lake.

http://climate.weath...D=97&dispBack=1

I know it shows our average snowfall as 68cm. However there was some missing snowfall data in 1996 and for some reason the entire year was excluded from the 1981-2010 average. Just happens that we had 86.6” in 1996, which brings up that 30 year average almost 3”.
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#45
snow_wizard

Posted 14 March 2018 - 10:02 PM

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There does appear to have been a regime shift back to snowier winters (IE: back to the climatology of the last 400yrs). The 20th century was exceptionally terrible/anomalous.

Lots of similar trendlines in stations that weren’t relocated.

bddouLv.gif

ZkKP8kQ.gif

9mNcdv5.gif

ZEHu5Lj.gif

ubCPA4E.gif

EONAtvF.gif

 

At some point we should start to see that kick in here as well.


  • Phil likes this

Death To Warm Anomalies!

 

Winter 2018-19 stats

 

Total Snowfall = 0.0"

Coldest Low = 26

Lows 32 or below = 13

Highs 32 or below = 0

Lows Below 20 = 0

Highs 40 or below = 0

 

 


#46
Jesse

Posted 14 March 2018 - 10:05 PM

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That 81 seems insane if true. Is that considered a legit reading?


You might have missed my question Jim.

#47
Phil

Posted 14 March 2018 - 11:16 PM

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Shawnigan Lake.

http://climate.weath...D=97&dispBack=1

I know it shows our average snowfall as 68cm. However there was some missing snowfall data in 1996 and for some reason the entire year was excluded from the 1981-2010 average. Just happens that we had 86.6” in 1996, which brings up that 30 year average almost 3”.


Thanks. I wish you guys didn’t use metric units. Blah.

Also, isn’t it 1995 that’s missing?

ftp://ftp.tor.ec.gc.ca/Pub/Documentation_Canadian_Climate_Normals/1971_2000/Canadian_Climate_Normals_1971_2000_Calculation_Information.pdf
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#48
ShawniganLake

Posted 15 March 2018 - 03:31 AM

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Thanks. I wish you guys didn’t use metric units. Blah.

Also, isn’t it 1995 that’s missing?

ftp://ftp.tor.ec.gc.ca/Pub/Documentation_Canadian_Climate_Normals/1971_2000/Canadian_Climate_Normals_1971_2000_Calculation_Information.pdf

That link doesn’t want to work for me. I thought 1996 was missing as December is flagged with incomplete data and 1995 looks complete. If it’s indeed 1995 that’s missing from the 1981-2010 averages than our yearly snowfall is closer to 28”.

#49
Front Ranger

Posted 15 March 2018 - 06:49 AM

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You might have missed my question Jim.

 

He answered it in his response to my post. 


Cool anomalies soothe the soul.


#50
HighlandExperience

Posted 22 March 2018 - 07:16 PM

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That's fine, but as I was saying it's very misleading to say SEA averages 5" a year. Amazingly the Puget Sound region averaged around 25" per winter from 1880 - 1900.


Both Seattle and Philly are pathetic in my book.

I’ll still take Seattle better access to close by snow.