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“Something’s Not Right in Southern Oregon”


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#1
Andie

Posted 21 March 2018 - 04:57 AM

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I've been reading more and more articles on the Subduction zone off of the Washington/Oregon coast. Seismologists have registered growing concerns. When I spotted this resident's observation I had to ask myself if the animals and birds experiencing something that's warning them off. Many times before seismic events, the wildlife will begin to act very different.
Any observations from members?

“Something’s Not Right in Southern Oregon”

Resident, Rogue Valley, Oregon on March 19, 2018

March 19, 2018 Rogue Valley, Oregon – Earthfiles has been receiving worried emails from viewers and listeners who sense that something is significantly wrong in a number of American communities — ranging from absence of insects and pollinators to missing birds. This morning I received the following email from a man who has lived in southwestern Oregon’s Rogue Valley eleven miles north of Medford for 30 years.
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“I live on twenty acres on the tip of a mountain that overlooks the entire Rogue Valley. I live among a vast array of wildlife, and I pay particular attention to the avian population.

Normally, the Vultures arrive back in the Rogue Valley around the first week in March, but this year the Vultures started returning the first week in February in small numbers, but it was still significant because I’d never seen that before in the nearly 30 years I’ve lived here.

My hummingbirds are legion and I feed them with up to four large feeders. The Anna Hummingbirds stay all through the winter, while their smaller brethren return from the south arrive about the same time as the Vultures. Not only have the smaller Hummingbirds not returned yet, but all of a sudden, my huge population of Anna Hummingbirds have vanished completely and I haven’t had to fill a single feeder in at least a full week.

But what has really got my attention is the fact the Swallows have not yet returned, and that, more than any other barometer, tells me something is very, very wrong. The Swallows always return the first week of March too, but this is March 18th, and they are nowhere to be seen.

This winter has been relatively mild, with very low precipitation. It has gotten cold, but not as cold as previous years. California got a lot of rain due to El Nino, but again, not enough to disrupt a natural cycle.

Are we about to experience a severe natural disaster? While science has never recognized proof of strange animal behavior prior to a major natural disaster, there has been ample anecdotal input from observers like myself that animals can detect a major natural disaster about to happen.”

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“The Pacific Northwest hasn’t been rocked by a major earthquake from the Cascadia Subduction Zone in about 330 years, yet science has established that the Cascadia Subduction Zone blows on average every 300 years, so we’re overdue. But what makes the CSZ so dangerous is that it can hit 9.0 or more".......

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https://www.earthfil...outhern-oregon/

Before You Diagnose Yourself With Depression or Low Self-Esteem,...First Make Sure You Are Not In Fact, Just Surrounded By A$$holes.


#2
luminen

Posted 21 March 2018 - 04:38 PM

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Well, he is right about one thing. It's been an incredibly dry winter in Medford. Horrible climate over there.

 

As for patterns in animal behavior changing...well, we'll just have to wait and see, eh? :)



#3
iFred

Posted 21 March 2018 - 07:02 PM

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I love LMH's reporting



#4
Andie

Posted 22 March 2018 - 12:46 PM

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She's very good at sourcing.  You don't get an Emmy for being a reporter that relies on hearsay, as many do today.   Dealing in edgy news is always tough due to skeptics, but she has proven her early sourcing to play out as reliable in time. 

I've followed her for 20 yrs. and she's yet to be embarrassed by her stories.

 

The cause of the unusual wildlife and insects late arrivals will tell in time, but I'm curious as to whether they will remain absent, and any other odd behavior is noted as in fish in the streams, confusion in animals or birds having trouble with direction, etc. 

 

If anyone reads something on another source, please post it. 


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Before You Diagnose Yourself With Depression or Low Self-Esteem,...First Make Sure You Are Not In Fact, Just Surrounded By A$$holes.


#5
Dan the Weatherman

Posted 05 April 2018 - 08:27 PM

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She is wrong on one part that CA has gotten a lot of rain due to El Nino. We are in a weak La Nina for one thing, and CA has been rather dry this year, and has almost been record dry in Socal. Norcal has fared better, but is still below average, but better off than about a month ago when things were looking rather dire.