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SW Flow vs NW Flow?

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#1
WeatherArchive

Posted 01 September 2018 - 12:39 AM

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Which do you prefer and why? what are the pros and cons to each? I am biased to NW Flow as the air is cleaner and lower snow levels. Does NW flow always lower snow levels?



#2
TigerWoodsLibido

Posted 01 September 2018 - 01:01 AM

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Which do you prefer and why? what are the pros and cons to each? I am biased to NW Flow as the air is cleaner and lower snow levels. Does NW flow always lower snow levels?

 

Interesting northerly flow, especially offshore, bringing cold air from the Columbia basin toward a low pressure that stalls off the coast of Cape Blanco.


Springfield, Oregon cold season 18-19 Stats:

Coldest high: 37 (Dec 7)
Coldest low: 22 (Dec 6 & 7)

Days with below freezing temps: 13
Total snowfall: 0"
Last accumulating snowfall: February 21-22, 2018
Last sub-freezing high: Jan 13, 2017 (31)
Last White Christmas: 1990

Personal Stats:

Last accumulating snowfall: March 6, 2017
Last sub-freezing high: Jan 13, 2017 (31)
Last White Christmas: 2008

My Twitter @353jerseys4hope


#3
BLI snowman

Posted 01 September 2018 - 07:15 PM

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Summer: SW flow
Winter: NW flow


Rain and snow.
  • seattleweatherguy likes this

#4
Deweydog

Posted 02 September 2018 - 09:46 PM

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I prefer Aunt Flow.

I like a challenge.

All roads lead to Walgreens.  


#5
WeatherArchive

Posted 03 September 2018 - 04:09 AM

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Summer: SW flow
Winter: NW flow


Rain and snow.

Oh! NW flow in summer doesn't deliver.  why is it in the winter it does a fairly good job?



#6
Geos

Posted 06 September 2018 - 08:41 PM

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Oh! NW flow in summer doesn't deliver.  why is it in the winter it does a fairly good job?

 

Jet stream is farther north.


Finn Hill, elevation: 460 ft

2018 moisture: 38.63", 12/13
Lowest Temp of Winter 2018: 27°, 12/7

 

2018-2019 winter snowfall total: 0.00"2017-2018: 9.0", 2016-2017: 14.0"

Weather station/wx cam: http://map.bloomsky....qBxp6apnJSnqqm2
https://www.wundergr...OTHE144#history


#7
snow_wizard

Posted 09 September 2018 - 10:27 AM

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For my area WNW flow is terrible because it shadows my area from snow, but true NW flow can work out well sometimes.  One of the best bets for snow in a marginal or just cold enough to snow situation is often WSW.  In general there is no question NW flow brings colder / more enjoyable weather in the winter than SW.


Death To Warm Anomalies!

 

Winter 2018-19 stats

 

Total Snowfall = 0.0"

Coldest Low = 26

Lows 32 or below = 13

Highs 32 or below = 0

Lows Below 20 = 0

Highs 40 or below = 0

 

 


#8
Geos

Posted 10 September 2018 - 08:16 AM

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For my area WNW flow is terrible because it shadows my area from snow, but true NW flow can work out well sometimes.  One of the best bets for snow in a marginal or just cold enough to snow situation is often WSW.  In general there is no question NW flow brings colder / more enjoyable weather in the winter than SW.

 

Yeah definitely like the NW flow better. In order to avoid the sinking motion after the air rises and sinks downwind of the Olympics, it almost needs to be NNW. Like 270-300 degrees trajectory.


Finn Hill, elevation: 460 ft

2018 moisture: 38.63", 12/13
Lowest Temp of Winter 2018: 27°, 12/7

 

2018-2019 winter snowfall total: 0.00"2017-2018: 9.0", 2016-2017: 14.0"

Weather station/wx cam: http://map.bloomsky....qBxp6apnJSnqqm2
https://www.wundergr...OTHE144#history


#9
WeatherArchive

Posted 11 September 2018 - 09:30 PM

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For my area WNW flow is terrible because it shadows my area from snow, but true NW flow can work out well sometimes.  One of the best bets for snow in a marginal or just cold enough to snow situation is often WSW.  In general there is no question NW flow brings colder / more enjoyable weather in the winter than SW.

That's rather odd that SW flow can bring snow in marginal conditions but I've seen it sometimes.  What's up with that?



#10
ShawniganLake

Posted 11 September 2018 - 09:44 PM

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That's rather odd that SW flow can bring snow in marginal conditions but I've seen it sometimes. What's up with that?

Maybe depends where you live. NW flow is generally bone dry here. Most of our snow comes with precip from the SW meeting cold air from the NE.

#11
Geos

Posted 13 September 2018 - 06:55 AM

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Maybe depends where you live. NW flow is generally bone dry here. Most of our snow comes with precip from the SW meeting cold air from the NE.

 

Yeah you tend to hold onto cold air better up there. Must get trapped in between you and the mainland. Of course you have some orographic lift as well from that flow.


Finn Hill, elevation: 460 ft

2018 moisture: 38.63", 12/13
Lowest Temp of Winter 2018: 27°, 12/7

 

2018-2019 winter snowfall total: 0.00"2017-2018: 9.0", 2016-2017: 14.0"

Weather station/wx cam: http://map.bloomsky....qBxp6apnJSnqqm2
https://www.wundergr...OTHE144#history


#12
ShawniganLake

Posted 13 September 2018 - 09:17 AM

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Yeah you tend to hold onto cold air better up there. Must get trapped in between you and the mainland. Of course you have some orographic lift as well from that flow.

Any type of Easterly component to the wind will help trap the cold air up against the Vancouver Island mountains.

#13
WeatherArchive

Posted 15 September 2018 - 04:45 PM

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Yeah you tend to hold onto cold air better up there. Must get trapped in between you and the mainland. Of course you have some orographic lift as well from that flow.

What is the best setup for the east side of the valley? It seems like a lot of times the west side gets hit harder.



#14
Geos

Posted 17 September 2018 - 07:37 AM

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What is the best setup for the east side of the valley? It seems like a lot of times the west side gets hit harder.

 

For the west side you need cold air to be flowing through the Fraser Valley and Squamish Valley. Then you need moisture over that, but not in a SW flow but more from a NW flow where the cold air drainage is overtaken by deeper milder ocean air.


Finn Hill, elevation: 460 ft

2018 moisture: 38.63", 12/13
Lowest Temp of Winter 2018: 27°, 12/7

 

2018-2019 winter snowfall total: 0.00"2017-2018: 9.0", 2016-2017: 14.0"

Weather station/wx cam: http://map.bloomsky....qBxp6apnJSnqqm2
https://www.wundergr...OTHE144#history