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8.34 Feet of Snow in Capracotta, Italy in 18 Hrs. - Wld. Record

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#1
Andie

Posted 09 March 2015 - 02:34 PM

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256cm (8.34 ft) of snow Capracotta (which lies at 1,421 meters in the province of Isernia),

240cm (7.84 ft) in Pescocostanzo (which lies at 1,395 meters in the province of L’Aquila):

These are the two new records for snowfall in a span of only 24 hours, that is, in one day, although in reality all this snow fell in about 18 hours on Thursday, March 5, 2015.

And at higher altitudes, accumulations are much more significant.

The previous world record snowfall most snow in 24 hours was set in Silver Lake, Colorado, where between 20 and April 21, 1921 fell 193cm (6.33 ft) of snow in 24 hours.

http://www.meteoweb....edibili/408690/

Many jaw dropping photos.

Attached File  image.jpg   91.41KB   0 downloads
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#2
IbrChris

Posted 09 March 2015 - 05:41 PM

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WMO would still have to certify this as a world record but the photos are pretty neat.


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#3
bainbridgekid

Posted 09 March 2015 - 10:37 PM

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Wow.

 

Central Italy is pretty far down the list of places I would have pegged for world record snowfall.


2016-17 snowfall: 12"

 

12/8-9: 3.5"

12/23: 0.25"

12/31: 0.25"

2/3: 0.5"

2/5-6: 4"

2/26: 0.25"

2/27: 1.5"+0.5"+0.25"

2/28: 0.25"

3/7/17: 0.5"

3/8/17: 0.25"

 

 


#4
IbrChris

Posted 22 March 2015 - 05:15 PM

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From what I've heard the measurements are of wind drifts and not at all representative of a level surface snow accumulation which has been estimated to be in the neighborhood of 4'...still really impressive but more within the realm of what is possible given past measurements. Frankly I think the world's heaviest snowfalls are likely in heavy LE or OE squalls in Japan and downwind of the Great Lakes. Montague, NY has an unofficial 77" in 24 hours from LE which is probably close to what actually fell (not counting drifting). Silver Lake, CO number while official seems fairly high. CO is pretty far removed from moisture sources but a dry snow will lead to greater depth with same liquid eqivalent so it's not out of the realm of believability. For most orographically favored areas in the western US 50-65" in 24 hours is about it as far as what's possible.


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#5
Glacier

Posted 23 March 2015 - 09:00 AM

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Even though I grew up in a semi-arid area on the east side of the Coast Mountains that is typically too dry to get much in the way of snow, we could on occasion get massive dumps of snow during major spillover events. I'm not sure why sometimes a massive snow or rain storm would pound the coast, and give us almost nothing while at other times a massive rain or snow storm would spill over the mountains giving us almost as much as the coast. Back in November 1990 we had close to 4 feet of snow in one dump, and had to get our driveway plowed by a bulldozer. Officially it was more like 3 and a half feet, and fell over two different days. 

 

Northwest of the area, an even bigger event happened in February of 1999 when they had 145cm or 57" (4.75').