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Showing content with the highest reputation on 07/27/21 in all areas

  1. My first game of the season and they did not disappoint. Atmosphere was great and so was the weather! Best game I’ve been to in a LONG LONG time.
    4 points
  2. Antarctica on the whole having likely the coldest winter ever recorded. Here's Amundsen Scott South Pole obs for July thus far--- June was record cold. July is not far behind. Where is this on the the weather channel? Doesn't fit their agenda?? They could report it and blame on "climate change" - but smart people are seeing that is a bunch of bs when the coldest spot on earth is getting colder in winter. The "Climate Change" bs being AGW is being exposed -- climate is always changing and its got VERY little to do with humans and a trace gas. This record cold is not being reported on,, why??? You can bet if the deviations from avg were on the "+" side of things as much as they are "-", the warming channel would be all over it. btw- I have heard some reports of the coldest temp ever recorded may have occurred at Vostok "area" by satellite in the area of -130 to -140F in the cold wave in late June early July. This is satellite measured. Vostok data is hard to find as I think the station went under in the cold war but clear indications are that the S Pole is getting colder. In the Winter. Which is big when you factor in wet bulbs and saturation mixing ratios .This shouldn't be happening if the whole earth is getting warmer is basically my jest.
    4 points
  3. Buzz is really starting to build about this team…
    4 points
  4. From last nights storm. Produced some widespread large hail.... I can't find it now but saw a video near Red Lake of sideways hail storm pummeling a building, anything short of steel roofs and siding was probably getting shredded. Somehow I ended up with nothing more than a couple distant rumbles of thunder and a few raindrops as the storms parted over Lake of the Woods.
    3 points
  5. Interesting trends in the models for next week as the PNA is forecast to spike + even farther which really amps up the 500mb pattern. I saw this happen before in the years of 2013 and 2014 when the "Blob" in the NE PAC influenced the wx pattern for western Canada. N PAC SST's on fuego... Not surprised to see the CFSv2 seeing a lot of ridging hugging the western shores of North America for the duration of this month...not to mention, but that big time Block over Greenland??? Hudson Bay Vortex is going to flex its muscles and likely put an end to the summer that did not really exist up in the northern parts of Canada this year. I could see it start snowing early this year and by late Aug snows will begin flying and laying down the foundation up there.
    3 points
  6. We can finally say that Chicago has fulfilled their 1st Heat Wave of the season. ORD hit 94F yesterday making it the hottest temp of the season while some outer suburbs made it up to the upper 90's which is a bit surprising. The low DP's certainly helped temps rise quickly but I wonder how much higher would temps have peaked if it weren't for the Hazy skies?? Something to consider. In the meantime, DP's rise today and tomorrow as the sultry airmass will provide the fuel to possibly fire up more storms around here late tomorrow. It would be nice to see some more boomers but this would come in the overnight hours likely waking me up after midnight. Let's see how this develops. 0z NAM 3km... 06z GFS... 06z ICON... 0z RGEM... The data coming in is raising eyebrows....boy, this could be one hellova storm cluster...
    3 points
  7. Today will be two minutes and twenty eight seconds SHORTER than yesterday!
    2 points
  8. When I’m biking out here in the country on calm evenings or nights there’s a big difference in temps between tops and bottoms of the rolling hills by at least 5° or more. Was glad I had a light sweater when I was on the way home from a family reunion near midnight last night! Felt almost chilly in the dips! The reunion continues today with maybe 150+ people here. It will be to hot today.
    2 points
  9. Ft Worth starting its day at 83* It can’t get better from here. Everyone’s praying the power doesn’t fail. Heat index will hit 105*+ Yet I’ve read the poles have each experienced their coldest winters. This can’t bode well for our next winter. Texas is holding its breath in fear the grid will fail again.
    2 points
  10. Generator has been rolling since 10ish, tons of trees down in the Northwoods.
    2 points
  11. First off, glad to have you here! Awesome to see new faces streaming in. There are a couple answers to your question. The functional/"What does this mean for my weather?" answer (what I'm assuming you're looking for) is that troughing is associated with a southward "dip" in the jet stream+storm track; the inverse of a "ridge", which is a northward surge in the jet. Troughing is (usually!) associated with cooler, wetter weather and is what us snow weenies look out for in the winter, since they can bring down arctic air from Canada. There is a more technical answer to this question, since troughing is a real meteorological term that is associated with physics; although you do not need to learn this, since local weather knowledge+pattern recognition goes a long way, and is in most cases all you really need. -- If you are interested, the more technical/"correct" answer to this involves the literal thickness of the atmosphere. Warm air being less dense than cold air means that it literally takes up more volume per unit mass comparatively. This is significant because we know that due to gravity, the atmosphere exerts a certain amount of pressure at any given point on or above earth's surface. We can measure atmospheric pressure using a device called a barometer, which uses mercury to determine just how heavy the atmosphere is at that location; usually measured in millibars (mb) due to how fine that unit of measurement is. The higher you go, the less pressure is exerted, since there is less atmosphere weighing down from above (the rest is below.) At sea level, where most of the world lives, the atmosphere exerts roughly 1000mb of pressure. For the sake of simplicity, let's say we have two identical airmasses, except one is 5°C cooler all the way up (surface to tropopause) than the other. We'll call the cooler one our "trough" sample. Now since we know that cold air contains less volume than warm air due to its higher density, we can infer that our trough airmass will be denser, and consequentially less spacious, than our warm airmass. To understand why that's important, let's compare what's going on inside our two examples. Starting at the surface, in this case sea level, we find the same measurement between the two (close to 1000mb), since in both cases the same amount of mass is weighing down from above. But as we increase our elevation, at the same rate, we'll find that the amount of atmospheric pressure exerted begins to diverge. We'll notice that the colder airmass will have a lower atmospheric pressure than the warmer airmass, even at the same altitude, let's say 15,000 feet. In other words, we do not need to go as high up to find a given pressure reading than in the warm airmass. The elevation at which, say, 500mb exists, is literally lower in a cooler airmass than in a warm one. If you were to make a cross-section, with x representing a slice of the surface and y as altitude, you'd find that there would be a "dip" in 500mb elevation where the airmass was cooler. Hence, a "trough"! Why is this? Well again, we need to think about our airmasses in terms of both temperature and volume. As we raise our barometer higher into the trough airmass, we'll find that we're rising above more air molecules at a faster rate than in the warm airmass, since the air is cooler and denser. To get a better idea of why this is, I threw together a diagram, since I am not too elegant with words. The same concepts are there, but presented visually. Essentially the term trough in an atmospheric context is used when thinking in terms of pressure, like a topographical map. Wikipedia has a great article on it: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trough_(meteorology).
    2 points
  12. So I really appreciate how much enthusiasm you all have for weather and atmospheric analysis. I'm mostly a lurker here aside from when large events happen (like most I would imagine). And frankly, I graduated this past June with a degree in history so I'm no scientist. That being said my interest in weather is drawn from my history studies -- specifically the impacts weather has had on shaping humanity in a variety of different ways. All of this being said I think I'm beginning to pick up a few things and if I'm not correct please correct me so I can move forward with at the very least a basic understanding of both large scale and small scale events. When you guy's refer to 'troughing' is it related to a low pressure system descending from the north and bringing cold air? Does it require the absence of a high pressure system? I remember a few years ago there was hurricane Dorian (I think that was the one) which was essentially stopped by a brick wall of a high pressure system over Florida which caused it to sit over the Bahamas for a few days. Is there a link between the troughing you all refer to and the jet-stream diverting its course on a southerly direction, creating a void of low pressure and pulling down the aforementioned cool air? If you read through all of this I really appreciate it, I'm trying to learn bit by bit. Maybe one day I can be a solid contributor to these discussions! PS: Sorry if I rambled a bit I've had a few IPA's
    2 points
  13. Models are all over the place after day 6.
    1 point
  14. I think it’s safe to say there might be some PATTERN VOLATILITY coming up. Definitely a big shift from a very blah July.
    1 point
  15. Looks like our crew will be going out around August 5. Not sure what fire yet, though.
    1 point
  16. What a comeback! Go Mariners!
    1 point
  17. Decent convective outbreak a whole bunch of days from now on the Canada model.
    1 point
  18. Before the low clouds covered it up, I got this sweet cloudscape shot from this morning…
    1 point
  19. Troughing is just a broad term for a dip in the jet steam with some form of cyclonic flow and relatively cool upper levels.
    1 point
  20. Hit 91.4 here today, but the dew mixed out to the low 60s this afternoon so not too bad. Will be interesting to see what happens tomorrow through Thursday as the dews are supposed to be much higher and thus keep our highs around 100. Part of me wants to see a run at 110 plus with low humidity of course
    1 point
  21. Yep, more extreme events are definitely part of the climate change. Pacific NW and Canada had a 1 in a 1000 year probability heat event, China just had a 1 in a 1000 year flood event. Some places had the same amount of rain in a few days as they get in an entire year. https://www.climate.gov/news-features/event-tracker/preliminary-analysis-concludes-pacific-northwest-heat-wave-was-1000-year https://www.npr.org/2021/07/25/1020342822/flooding-continues-to-devastate-zhengzhou-city-in-central-china
    1 point
  22. As I have stated at times in the past I have two temperature sensors that are placed in my yard. One is placed in what I like to call the "cold" spot of the yard and the other in the "warm" spot. The over night low at the cold spot last night was 61.0 and and the warm spot the low was 63.1. Note in my reports I round up or down to the whole number. At this time the current readings are 68.4 (68) at the cold spot and 68.9 (69) at the warm spot. And yes I have switched the sensors and the results are the same the cold spot is colder and the warm spot is warmer most of the time that is less so on cloudy or windy days and nights when the readings are generally the same at both locations. Bottom line is that there can be temperature differences in a very short distance. I go for walks all the time and there is a place on my walks with a big hill to the west and in the low area east of the hill it is very noticeably cooler on clear calm evenings.
    1 point
  23. It has more to do with the forum's snow centricness than its Washington centricness.
    1 point
  24. Cedar Rapids' high/low temp last Saturday was 92/70. That is the only 90º high and the only 70º low this entire month. Today and Wednesday should add a couple more 90s.
    0 points
  25. He's correct down here. Right on the money!
    0 points
  26. 0 points
  27. Probably the biggest bust of a severe thunderstorm watch I have ever seen. Not even a single blip on radar.
    0 points
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