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Three Most Displaced Climate Zones on Earth


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I think Davis, WV qualifies here. What's cool is they have a peculiar "oceanic" climate, yet their growing season is shorter than Fairbanks, AK.

 

Accumulating snowfall and subfreezing temperatures have occurred in every month of the year, yet this climate is also quite mild and humid during the summer, with frequent thunderstorms (both terrain enhanced, and synoptic scale activity like derechos and squall lines). They average 134" of snowfall per winter, with blizzard conditions occurring on a regular basis, too.

 

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canaan_Valley#Climate

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I think Davis, WV qualifies here. What's cool is they have a peculiar "oceanic" climate, yet their growing season is shorter than Fairbanks, AK.

 

Accumulating snowfall and subfreezing temperatures have occurred in every month of the year, yet this climate is also quite mild and humid during the summer, with frequent thunderstorms (both terrain enhanced, and synoptic scale activity like derechos and squall lines). They average 134" of snowfall per winter, with blizzard conditions occurring on a regular basis, too.

 

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canaan_Valley#Climate

 

They're actually Humid Continental. January average of -3.1C/26.4F just barely qualifies them. 

 

Regardless, I'm also fascinated by Canaan Valley. Its definitely a place I want to visit sometime. 

 

The National Park Service citation indicates that the Valley is "a splendid 'museum' ofPleistocene habitats ... contain[ing] ... an aggregation of these habitats seldom found in the eastern United States. It is unique as a northern boreal relict community at this latitude by virtue of its size, elevation and diversity."

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They're actually Humid Continental. January average of -3.1C/26.4F just barely qualifies them.

 

Regardless, I'm also fascinated by Canaan Valley. Its definitely a place I want to visit sometime.

 

The National Park Service citation indicates that the Valley is "a splendid 'museum' ofPleistocene habitats ... contain[ing] ... an aggregation of these habitats seldom found in the eastern United States. It is unique as a northern boreal relict community at this latitude by virtue of its size, elevation and diversity."

Huh, I read somewhere that they're oceanic, but maybe that's the not the case.

 

It's a truly beautiful area. Would be an ideal climate for me.

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FWIW under the modified Koppen system the Western lowlands from Portland northward don't count as Mediterranean.  The modified system requires at least 8 months per year with monthly averages of 50+ for that classification. 

Death To Warm Anomalies!

 

Winter 2021-22 stats

 

Total Snowfall = 0.0"

Day with 1" or more snow depth = 0

Total Hail = 0.0"

Coldest Low = 29

Lows 32 or below = 7

Highs 32 or below = 0

Lows 20 or below = 0

Highs 40 or below = 0

 

 

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I think Davis, WV qualifies here. What's cool is they have a peculiar "oceanic" climate, yet their growing season is shorter than Fairbanks, AK.

 

Accumulating snowfall and subfreezing temperatures have occurred in every month of the year, yet this climate is also quite mild and humid during the summer, with frequent thunderstorms (both terrain enhanced, and synoptic scale activity like derechos and squall lines). They average 134" of snowfall per winter, with blizzard conditions occurring on a regular basis, too.

 

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canaan_Valley#Climate

 

Weird.  They call it marine West Coast.  Maybe something like the coast of BC north of Vancouver.

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Death To Warm Anomalies!

 

Winter 2021-22 stats

 

Total Snowfall = 0.0"

Day with 1" or more snow depth = 0

Total Hail = 0.0"

Coldest Low = 29

Lows 32 or below = 7

Highs 32 or below = 0

Lows 20 or below = 0

Highs 40 or below = 0

 

 

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Weird. They call it marine West Coast. Maybe something like the coast of BC north of Vancouver.

I think the relatively small (cold season) diurnal temperature variations play a role in the classification.

 

I've been up there every month of the year. During winter, it's cloudy and/or snowing 80% of the time under due to orographic lifting, so there's often very little difference between the high/low..usually it's something like a high of 20*F and a low of 15*F.

 

During summer, meanwhile, the diurnal temperature swings are a bit larger given most precipitation is convective in nature (thunderstorms). Still, a typical afternoon will be 75-80 degrees with a dewpoint of 65-70 degrees, with fog developing rapidly in the late evening as temperatures cool radiatively and the dewpoint depression reaches zero. Overnight lows during the summer generally fall into the 50s, dropping the dewpoints with them, so mornings are fantastic as the fog usually holds until ~10AM, followed by a rapid burn-off and increase in temperatures and humidity after 11AM.

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Another fascinating climate can be found in Uyuni, Bolivia. 

 

Look at that diurnal range. 59/9 spread in May!

 

This is at 12,139' and 20S latitude. 

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Uyuni#Climate

 

Talk about a crazy climate!  I could almost enjoy that in a weird sort of way.  A plain at 12,000 feet seems almost inconceivable.  Pretty harsh place.

Death To Warm Anomalies!

 

Winter 2021-22 stats

 

Total Snowfall = 0.0"

Day with 1" or more snow depth = 0

Total Hail = 0.0"

Coldest Low = 29

Lows 32 or below = 7

Highs 32 or below = 0

Lows 20 or below = 0

Highs 40 or below = 0

 

 

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Another fascinating climate can be found in Uyuni, Bolivia. 

 

Look at that diurnal range. 59/9 spread in May!

 

This is at 12,139' and 20S latitude. 

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Uyuni#Climate

 

Talk about a recipe for sun burn!   12,000 feet up at that latitude.

**REPORTED CONDITIONS AND ANOMALIES ARE NOT MEANT TO IMPLY ANYTHING ON A REGIONAL LEVEL UNLESS SPECIFICALLY STATED**

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Another interesting case is Chokurdakh, at 70'38" in Siberia. They make a recovery from an otherwise frozen polar environment (7.9F annual avg) to 61/44 in July. Note the dramatic recovery from April/May to July. I doubt this temperature profile exists anywhere else in the world at that latitude.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chokurdakh#Climate

 

I found an even better example. Saskylakh at 71'57" north latitude. Because of the northward extension of the Siberian landmass, this location is able to recover from 25/11 in May to 61/44 in July.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saskylakh#Climate

 

The summers here are warm enough to support tree growth. The "Lukunsky Grove" of Dahurian Larch survives at 72'31" and is considered to be the northernmost forest in the world. Thus, this region also represents the northernmost extension of a Subarctic climate anywhere in the world and the northernmost location that doesn't have a Polar (ET or EF) climate in the world. 

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lukunsky_grove

 

http://www.wondermondo.com/Countries/E/RUS/Krasnoyarsk/Lukunsky.htm

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Technically it's not and Köppen climate classification outlier, but I've always thought that coastal Peru and northern Chile has one of the weirdest climates in the world.

 

It's in the tropics, but is usually cool (by tropical standards at sea level).     Temperatures only very rarely rise to 80F (also unusual in the tropics at sea level).    It is extremely dry (precipitation wise, much, much drier than Death Valley and as dry or drier than most of the Sahara).   Despite its dryness, every time I have been there it is damp, cool, and often foggy (which it is most of the year).  Fog and dampness are very common although it almost never rains (Arica has gone 14 years with no rain, yet is is cool and foggy and without sunshine for much of the year).   It's like a more extreme version of the summer of San Francisco, but year round.   I don't think there is a place with a climate like that anywhere else in the tropics and at sea level.  

 

Edit:  Oops; I see that coastal Peru was already mentioned earlier.

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Turpan Depression in western China should get an honorable mention.

 

Parts of the Uinta Basin (Utah/Western Colorado) have a fairly similar climate, though not quite as warm in summer.

 

Turpan = 10.2F average low in January/103.3F average high in July.

 

Dinosaur Quarry = 4.3F average low in January/95.0 average high in July.

 

http://www.wrcc.dri.edu/cgi-bin/cliMAIN.pl?ut2173

 

The Uinta Basin is not quite as dry, but most stations get 5-9 inches of average precip.

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