Jump to content
The Weather Forums

Recommended Posts

Thin Sea Ice, Thick Snow, and Widespread Negative Freeboard Observed During N‐ICE2015 North of Svalbard

 

https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/2017JC012865

 

https://www.sott.net/article/388629-Study-Arctic-sea-ice-is-thicker-now-than-it-was-in-1955

 

In recent years, sea‐ice conditions in the Arctic Ocean changed substantially toward a younger and thinner sea‐ice cover. To capture the scope of these changes and identify the differences between individual regions, in situ observations from expeditions are a valuable data source. We present a continuous time series of in situ measurements from the N‐ICE2015 expedition from January to June 2015 in the Arctic Basin north of Svalbard, comprising snow buoy and ice mass balance buoy data and local and regional data gained from electromagnetic induction (EM) surveys and snow probe measurements from four distinct drifts. The observed mean snow depth of 0.53 m for April to early June is 73% above the average value of 0.30 m from historical and recent observations in this region, covering the years 1955–2017

 

IMG_3239.JPGIMG_3239.JPG

  • Like 2

Before You Diagnose Yourself With Depression or Low Self-Esteem,...First Make Sure You Are Not In Fact, Just Surrounded By A$$holes.

 

2018 Rainfall - 62.65" High Temp. - 110.03* Low Temp. - 8.4*

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thin Sea Ice, Thick Snow, and Widespread Negative Freeboard Observed During N‐ICE2015 North of Svalbard

 

https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/2017JC012865

 

https://www.sott.net/article/388629-Study-Arctic-sea-ice-is-thicker-now-than-it-was-in-1955

 

In recent years, sea‐ice conditions in the Arctic Ocean changed substantially toward a younger and thinner sea‐ice cover. To capture the scope of these changes and identify the differences between individual regions, in situ observations from expeditions are a valuable data source. We present a continuous time series of in situ measurements from the N‐ICE2015 expedition from January to June 2015 in the Arctic Basin north of Svalbard, comprising snow buoy and ice mass balance buoy data and local and regional data gained from electromagnetic induction (EM) surveys and snow probe measurements from four distinct drifts. The observed mean snow depth of 0.53 m for April to early June is 73% above the average value of 0.30 m from historical and recent observations in this region, covering the years 1955–2017

 

IMG_3239.JPG IMG_3239.JPG

But but but...that can't be! Global panic and whatnot wouldn't make sense. :lol: :rolleyes:

Link to post
Share on other sites

But but but...that can't be! Global panic and whatnot wouldn't make sense. :lol: :rolleyes:

Didn't Al Gore say the ice was supposed to be all melted by last year? :lol:

  • Like 1

>1" Snowfalls for Fargo-Hector Int'l Airport in 2020-21: 10/20 (4.2"), 10/22 (2.7"), 12/23 (1.2"), 12/27 (1.8"), 12/29-30 (4.1"), 1/23 (1.9"),

 

Total Snowfall for 2020-2021 @ KFAR: 26.8"            Coldest Low: -25*F (2/15)

 

 

First flake of the season: 10/15 @ 21:27 CDT

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Just for balanced information, here's the antarctic picture. Sometimes there ARE goblins lurking under the bed.

 

https://www.arcus.org/sipn/sea-ice-outlook/2018/june

 

However:

 

Seroussi and Ivins’ simulations using a heat flow higher than 150 milliwatts per square meter showed too much melting to be compatible with the space-based data, except in one location: an area inland of the Ross Sea known for intense flows of water. This region required a heat flow of at least 150-180 milliwatts per square meter to agree with the observations. However, seismic imaging has shown that mantle heat in this region may reach the ice sheet through a rift, that is, a fracture in Earth’s crust such as appears in Africa’s Great Rift Valley.

 

https://wattsupwiththat.com/2017/11/07/nasa-volcanic-magma-plume-under-antarctica-may-explain-ice-sheet-instability/

 

And

 

Nearly 100 Volcanoes detected under the Antarctic. That doesn't count those on the bed of the sea under the Ross ice shelf.

 

https://www.livescience.com/60133-volcanoes-discovered-beneath-antarctica.html

Before You Diagnose Yourself With Depression or Low Self-Esteem,...First Make Sure You Are Not In Fact, Just Surrounded By A$$holes.

 

2018 Rainfall - 62.65" High Temp. - 110.03* Low Temp. - 8.4*

Link to post
Share on other sites

Just for balanced information, here's the antarctic picture. Sometimes there ARE goblins lurking under the bed.

 

https://www.arcus.org/sipn/sea-ice-outlook/2018/june

 

However:

 

Seroussi and Ivins’ simulations using a heat flow higher than 150 milliwatts per square meter showed too much melting to be compatible with the space-based data, except in one location: an area inland of the Ross Sea known for intense flows of water. This region required a heat flow of at least 150-180 milliwatts per square meter to agree with the observations. However, seismic imaging has shown that mantle heat in this region may reach the ice sheet through a rift, that is, a fracture in Earth’s crust such as appears in Africa’s Great Rift Valley.

 

https://wattsupwiththat.com/2017/11/07/nasa-volcanic-magma-plume-under-antarctica-may-explain-ice-sheet-instability/

 

And

 

Nearly 100 Volcanoes detected under the Antarctic. That doesn't count those on the bed of the sea under the Ross ice shelf.

 

https://www.livescience.com/60133-volcanoes-discovered-beneath-antarctica.html

Speaking of Volcanoes Robert Filex discusses the underground volcanoes quite a bit and how it is connected to ocean warming.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I got this from Felixs site.

 

White is no ice. I don't see any white at the pole.

 

http://polarportal.dk/en/sea-ice-and-icebergs/sea-ice-thickness-and-volume/

 

IMG_3250.PNG

  • Like 2

Before You Diagnose Yourself With Depression or Low Self-Esteem,...First Make Sure You Are Not In Fact, Just Surrounded By A$$holes.

 

2018 Rainfall - 62.65" High Temp. - 110.03* Low Temp. - 8.4*

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

Plenty of cool out there, but no one is talking about it. Look at all that white and blue.

The Arctic and Antarctic are showing increased ice and cold.

Are there hot and dry spots? Of course, but this is a map for July 9th

 

IMG_3280.PNG

  • Like 2

Before You Diagnose Yourself With Depression or Low Self-Esteem,...First Make Sure You Are Not In Fact, Just Surrounded By A$$holes.

 

2018 Rainfall - 62.65" High Temp. - 110.03* Low Temp. - 8.4*

Link to post
Share on other sites

Plenty of cool out there, but no one is talking about it. Look at all that white and blue.

The Arctic and Antarctic are showing increased ice and cold.

Are there hot and dry spots? Of course, but this is a map for July 9th

 

IMG_3280.PNG

Lots of blue and white over the poles. Glad to see that. Anytime it's cold at the poles, there are going to be warmer spots somewhere in the mid-latitudes and vice versa. I guess the law of equal and opposite reactions doesn't apply to the atmosphere though. :lol:

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
×
×
  • Create New...