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October 2020 Weather Observations for the PNW


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2 hours ago, Jesse said:

What type of pine is that on the middle right Andrew. 

Non conifer expert here but I believe the tree in question could be either a, 

Western Hemlock or Grand Fir 

Whatever it is, it looks sickly.

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Here's the snow thus far

Sorry guys I ended up getting chased around the outside of the building at work by a whacked out homeless guy on drugs...That was a first! I was mostly worried about the snot coming out of his nose as

Just catching up to everything this morning. I think given that the user base of the forum has been somewhat of a close knit community for 15+ years, there is a bit of leeway given when it comes to be

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4 minutes ago, Jbolin said:

Non conifer expert here but I believe the tree in question could be either a, 

Western Hemlock or Grand Fir 

Whatever it is, it looks sickly.

It’s definitely some sort of pine. 

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2 hours ago, TT-SEA said:

Its been very wet over the last month in WA and western OR... and not so much elsewhere in the West.

 

anomimage (3).png

 

HIO only had 8 days with 0.04" or more in the last two months. Those days just had particularly heavy rain. It hasn't felt overly wet.

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1 minute ago, Rubus Leucodermis said:

Western white pine (Pinus monticola) is native to some areas of the Salish Sea lowlands, where it prefers areas with glacial hardpan soils.

Though on closer inspection, it looks more like a Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) or a Japanese red pine (Pinus densiflora), neither of which are native, but both of which are commonly planted here. A picture from closer up would help.

It's called clown range for a reason.

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28 minutes ago, Rubus Leucodermis said:

 

Western white pine (Pinus monticola) is native to some areas of the Salish Sea lowlands, where it prefers areas with glacial hardpan soils.

Whitebark pine and limber pine are also in the white pine family.

I’m like 80% sure it’s a white pine? The split trunk is pretty common with whitebark pine IIRC. 

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7 minutes ago, Rubus Leucodermis said:

Neither are commonly planted as ornamentals or native to this region.

Whitebark Pine is native to the NW. So is the western white pine.

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Weighing in on the pine question:

Grab a branch and examine the needles. They have to be in groups of 5 for it to be any type of white pine, including limber or whitebark. I doubt it's either of those, as they prefer alpine conditions at much higher elevation.

Needles in groups of 2, could be ponderosa or lodgepole or knobcone. The scraggly appearance makes me lean toward knobcone.

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6 minutes ago, Eujunga said:

Weighing in on the pine question:

Grab a branch and examine the needles. They have to be in groups of 5 for it to be any type of white pine, including limber or whitebark. I doubt it's either of those, as they prefer alpine conditions at much higher elevation.

Needles in groups of 2, could be ponderosa or lodgepole or knobcone. The scraggly appearance makes me lean toward knobcone.

White pines can grow well outside their “native” range, though. They don’t procreate efficiently there, but they’ll grow.

My house is surrounded by thick stands of white pine, and this place is essentially tropical for 30% of the year. They’ve grown like weeds despite being native to the higher terrain originally. They were planted as saplings in 1984. Now they’re 60-80 feet tall. They have a distinct growing pattern vs any other conifers that grow here.

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2 minutes ago, Eujunga said:

Needles in groups of 2, could be ponderosa or lodgepole or knobcone. The scraggly appearance makes me lean toward knobcone.

Needles too short for ponderosa.

Doesn’t look right for lodgepole or shore pine (both native, both subspecies of the same species). Besides, these two are rather specialized and fussy about where they grow here and thus not common.

Knobcone is not commonly used as an ornamental or native to this area.

I’m going with Scots pine. It’s very commonly planted, and often has a sparse appearance like the one pictured.

It's called clown range for a reason.

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2 minutes ago, Phil said:

White pines can grow well outside their “native” range, though. They don’t procreate efficiently there, but they’ll grow.

Whitebark and limber pines, the two white pine species Eujunga was talking about, are not commonly grown as ornamentals. They do not fare well in a lowland climate. Whitebark in particular is adapted to the highest elevations; typically when climbing above timberline in the Cascades, the last trees one will see will be whitebark pines.

Eastern white pine, which is almost certainly the one planted at your place, yes, that is a common ornamental, even here in the west, and it does fine in the lowlands.

It's called clown range for a reason.

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44/30 here today with white Spruce trees this morning.

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Cold Season 2020/21:

Total snowfall: 10.0"

Highest daily snowfall: 7.0"

Highest snow depth: 7.0"

Coldest high: 24.0º

Coldest low: 5.2º

Number of subzero days: 0

Personal Weather Station on Wunderground: 

https://www.wunderground.com/personal-weather-station/dashboard?ID=KMTBOZEM152#history

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5 minutes ago, Rubus Leucodermis said:

Needles too short for ponderosa.

Doesn’t look right for lodgepole or shore pine (both native, both subspecies of the same species). Besides, these two are rather specialized and fussy about where they grow here and thus not common.

Knobcone is not commonly used as an ornamental or native to this area.

I’m going with Scots pine. It’s very commonly planted, and often has a sparse appearance like the one pictured.

Isn’t Scots Pine a Eurasian tree?

Beyond that, its certainly possible.

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6 minutes ago, Phil said:

Isn’t Scots Pine a Eurasian tree?

Beyond that, its certainly possible.

Certainly is! Grows throughout northern Eurasia, from Scotland in the west to Vladivostok in the east. Also a very common ornamental.

It's called clown range for a reason.

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4 minutes ago, Rubus Leucodermis said:

Needles too short for ponderosa.

Doesn’t look right for lodgepole or shore pine (both native, both subspecies of the same species). Besides, these two are rather specialized and fussy about where they grow here and thus not common.

Knobcone is not commonly used as an ornamental or native to this area.

I’m going with Scots pine. It’s very commonly planted, and often has a sparse appearance like the one pictured.

Looked at it again, and I like your suggestion of Japanese red pine. Or maybe the redness is just the evening light.

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5 minutes ago, Rubus Leucodermis said:

Whitebark and limber pines, the two white pine species Eujunga was talking about, are not commonly grown as ornamentals. They do not fare well in a lowland climate. Whitebark in particular is adapted to the highest elevations; typically when climbing above timberline in the Cascades, the last trees one will see will be whitebark pines.

Eastern white pine, which is almost certainly the one planted at your place, yes, that is a common ornamental, even here in the west, and it does fine in the lowlands.

We have eastern and western white pine growing here.

Planet ornamentally, obviously.

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Just now, Phil said:

We have eastern and western white growing here. 

That’s unusual. Western white pine is not commonly planted in the east, to my knowledge. It’s larger, darker, and has denser foliage and larger cones than its eastern cousin, though still obviously a white pine and very closely-related to it.

It's called clown range for a reason.

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So I will say whatever it is was probably planted soon after the house was built in the early 70s, so it could be non native. I have a few random trees that are bit out of place including what I believe to be some kind of Spruce that has huge pine cones. 
 

I planted an Alaska Cedar soon after I moved in and it is doing quite well. 

Snowfall                                  Precip

2020-21: 0                         2020-21: 3.38"

2019-20: 23.5"                   2019-20: 58.54"

2018-19: 63.5"                   2018-19: 66.33"

2017-18: 30.3"                   2017-18: 59.83"

2016-17: 49.2"                   2016-17: 97.58"

2015-16: 11.75"                 2015-16: 68.67"

2014-15: 3.5"
2013-14: 11.75"                  2013-14: 62.30
2012-13: 16.75"                 2012-13: 78.45  

2011-12: 98.5"                   2011-12: 92.67"

 

It's always sunny at Winters Hill! 

 

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Just now, SouthHillFrosty said:

A lot of wind lately

Wind1.jpg

Wind.jpg

The fire station just up the road gusted to 45 the other day. They also had a 40+ gust on Sunday. They are a little more exposed than my location though. 

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Snowfall                                  Precip

2020-21: 0                         2020-21: 3.38"

2019-20: 23.5"                   2019-20: 58.54"

2018-19: 63.5"                   2018-19: 66.33"

2017-18: 30.3"                   2017-18: 59.83"

2016-17: 49.2"                   2016-17: 97.58"

2015-16: 11.75"                 2015-16: 68.67"

2014-15: 3.5"
2013-14: 11.75"                  2013-14: 62.30
2012-13: 16.75"                 2012-13: 78.45  

2011-12: 98.5"                   2011-12: 92.67"

 

It's always sunny at Winters Hill! 

 

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1 minute ago, SilverFallsAndrew said:

The fire station just up the road gusted to 45 the other day. They also had a 40+ gust on Sunday. They are a little more exposed than my location though. 

You guys are also getting a little bit of wind also then!

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1 minute ago, iFred said:

I love wind storms that show up only a day or two out. I’ll be on the Edmonds ferry going to Sequim when that blows on through. Should be fun.

Don't blow away. We like the new forum updates. Also, have you ever thought of creating an app eventually? Ik that would be a lot of work

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Here are some close ups I just took of the needles. I can’t reach any of the branches so this is as good as I can do right now. 

2F8F2A15-DA6B-478F-B0FF-29366A801AF2.jpeg

6F0D184D-0350-42CB-A9BA-8BDAC9E25267.jpeg

Snowfall                                  Precip

2020-21: 0                         2020-21: 3.38"

2019-20: 23.5"                   2019-20: 58.54"

2018-19: 63.5"                   2018-19: 66.33"

2017-18: 30.3"                   2017-18: 59.83"

2016-17: 49.2"                   2016-17: 97.58"

2015-16: 11.75"                 2015-16: 68.67"

2014-15: 3.5"
2013-14: 11.75"                  2013-14: 62.30
2012-13: 16.75"                 2012-13: 78.45  

2011-12: 98.5"                   2011-12: 92.67"

 

It's always sunny at Winters Hill! 

 

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This is a picture of one of the volunteers below that tree... it doesn’t even look like the same type of tree though, unless maybe just because it is an immature version? 

162A23CB-AD8B-4F11-BD51-4475BF2EFD3F.jpeg

Snowfall                                  Precip

2020-21: 0                         2020-21: 3.38"

2019-20: 23.5"                   2019-20: 58.54"

2018-19: 63.5"                   2018-19: 66.33"

2017-18: 30.3"                   2017-18: 59.83"

2016-17: 49.2"                   2016-17: 97.58"

2015-16: 11.75"                 2015-16: 68.67"

2014-15: 3.5"
2013-14: 11.75"                  2013-14: 62.30
2012-13: 16.75"                 2012-13: 78.45  

2011-12: 98.5"                   2011-12: 92.67"

 

It's always sunny at Winters Hill! 

 

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Just now, jakeinthevalley said:

My conifers are all dead due to the drought and heat from the last couple years.....

I was worried about that, but only a couple of them died, and only one large tree. I think we are high enough the heat and drought were not a huge issue. Down in the Eugene area it is awful. 

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Snowfall                                  Precip

2020-21: 0                         2020-21: 3.38"

2019-20: 23.5"                   2019-20: 58.54"

2018-19: 63.5"                   2018-19: 66.33"

2017-18: 30.3"                   2017-18: 59.83"

2016-17: 49.2"                   2016-17: 97.58"

2015-16: 11.75"                 2015-16: 68.67"

2014-15: 3.5"
2013-14: 11.75"                  2013-14: 62.30
2012-13: 16.75"                 2012-13: 78.45  

2011-12: 98.5"                   2011-12: 92.67"

 

It's always sunny at Winters Hill! 

 

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Looking at pictures of lodgepole cones, I think Jesse is right. Also it puts off an incredible amount of pollen in late spring.  Not sure how many conifers do that? 

Snowfall                                  Precip

2020-21: 0                         2020-21: 3.38"

2019-20: 23.5"                   2019-20: 58.54"

2018-19: 63.5"                   2018-19: 66.33"

2017-18: 30.3"                   2017-18: 59.83"

2016-17: 49.2"                   2016-17: 97.58"

2015-16: 11.75"                 2015-16: 68.67"

2014-15: 3.5"
2013-14: 11.75"                  2013-14: 62.30
2012-13: 16.75"                 2012-13: 78.45  

2011-12: 98.5"                   2011-12: 92.67"

 

It's always sunny at Winters Hill! 

 

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11 minutes ago, SilverFallsAndrew said:

Looking at pictures of lodgepole cones, I think Jesse is right. Also it puts off an incredible amount of pollen in late spring.  Not sure how many conifers do that? 

If they are putting off lots of pollen, I'm guessing they can't be white pines, Phil says those have trouble bumpin uglies.....

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20 minutes ago, SilverFallsAndrew said:

Looking at pictures of lodgepole cones, I think Jesse is right. Also it puts off an incredible amount of pollen in late spring.  Not sure how many conifers do that? 

Not sure if it is a lodgepole pine or not but I have some kind of pine tree right out side here and this spring it produced big clouds of pollen for about 1-2 weeks. It was pretty bad because I'm allergic to it. Its needles are medium length and relatively thick (not short like jack pine nor long like ponderosa).

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39 minutes ago, SilverFallsAndrew said:

Here are some close ups I just took of the needles. I can’t reach any of the branches so this is as good as I can do right now. 

[edited]

Thanks for the pics. Still going with Scots pine.

It's called clown range for a reason.

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5 minutes ago, Rubus Leucodermis said:

Thanks for the pics. Still going with Scots pine.

After looking at more pics of Scots Pine, I think I have to tentatively agree with you. 

Snowfall                                  Precip

2020-21: 0                         2020-21: 3.38"

2019-20: 23.5"                   2019-20: 58.54"

2018-19: 63.5"                   2018-19: 66.33"

2017-18: 30.3"                   2017-18: 59.83"

2016-17: 49.2"                   2016-17: 97.58"

2015-16: 11.75"                 2015-16: 68.67"

2014-15: 3.5"
2013-14: 11.75"                  2013-14: 62.30
2012-13: 16.75"                 2012-13: 78.45  

2011-12: 98.5"                   2011-12: 92.67"

 

It's always sunny at Winters Hill! 

 

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49 minutes ago, iFred said:

I love wind storms that show up only a day or two out. I’ll be on the Edmonds ferry going to Sequim when that blows on through. Should be fun.

I lived on Bainbridge for five years, and got to experience being on a ferry in windy conditions more than once. They seldom cancelled the Seattle/Bainbridge run due to weather. Takes a lot to cause serious issues for boats that big.

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It's called clown range for a reason.

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Nov 29 2006...a bone-chilling 41F.

We can do better than that.

Springfield, Oregon cold season 20-21 Stats:

  • Coldest high: 57F (Oct 22)
  • Coldest low: 30F (Oct 23)
  • Days with below freezing temps: 2 (Most recent: Oct 23, 2020)
  • Days with sub-40F highs: 0 (Most recent: Nov 30, 2019) *Fewest all-time*
  • Total snowfall: 0.0"
  • Last accumulating snowfall: February 27, 2019
  • Last sub-freezing high: Jan 14, 2017 (31F)
  • Last White Christmas: 1990
  • Significant wind events (gusts 45+): 0

Personal Stats:

  • Last accumulating snowfall: February 27, 2019
  • Last sub-freezing high: Jan 14, 2017 (31)
  • Last White Christmas: 2008
  • Total snowfall since joining TheWeatherForums: 20.7"

GoFundMe: www.gofundme.com/CollegeBasketballvsEpilepsy

My Twitter @357jerseys4hope

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Just now, TigerWoodsLibido said:

Nov 29 2006...a bone-chilling 41F.

We can do better than that.

Snowed about 10-15” up here with that... 

Snowfall                                  Precip

2020-21: 0                         2020-21: 3.38"

2019-20: 23.5"                   2019-20: 58.54"

2018-19: 63.5"                   2018-19: 66.33"

2017-18: 30.3"                   2017-18: 59.83"

2016-17: 49.2"                   2016-17: 97.58"

2015-16: 11.75"                 2015-16: 68.67"

2014-15: 3.5"
2013-14: 11.75"                  2013-14: 62.30
2012-13: 16.75"                 2012-13: 78.45  

2011-12: 98.5"                   2011-12: 92.67"

 

It's always sunny at Winters Hill! 

 

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