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Monthly Synoptic Summary

Atmospheric Indexes ENSO PNA NAO AO

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#1
PRISM

Posted 17 March 2014 - 07:36 AM

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All:

 

You might not be aware of this excellent summary of the weather pattern (e.g. indexes) after the facts:

 

http://www.ncdc.noaa...synoptic/2014/2

 

Note: This Synoptic Discussion describes recent weather events and climate anomalies in relation to the phenomena that cause the weather. These phenomena include the jet stream, fronts and low pressure systems that bring precipitation, high pressure systems that bring dry weather, and the mechanisms which control these features — such as El Niño, La Niña, and other oceanic and atmospheric drivers (PNA, NAO, AO, and others). The report may contain more technical language than other components of the State of the Climate series.

 

Goes back to 2011 by month.


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#2
TheBigOne

Posted 18 March 2014 - 02:30 AM

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What doe synoptic mean?   I am just curious that's all.  Thanks! 



#3
PRISM

Posted 18 March 2014 - 08:56 AM

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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 

The synoptic scale in meteorology (also known as large scale or cyclonic scale) is a horizontal length scale of the order of 1000 kilometres (about 620 miles) or more.[1] This corresponds to a horizontal scale typical of mid-latitude depressions (e.g. extratropical cyclones). Most high and low-pressure areas seen on weather maps such as surface weather analyses are synoptic-scale systems, driven by the location of Rossby waves in their respective hemisphere. Low-pressure areas and their related frontal zones occur on the leading edge of a trough within the Rossby wave pattern, while surface highs form on the back edge of the trough. Most precipitation areas occur near frontal zones. The word synoptic is derived from the Greek word συνοπτικός (synoptikos), meaning seen together.

 

BTW, I met Rossby's son in the late 1970s while he was gathering weather data in the F.G.G.E. (First GARP Global Experiment):  http://www.gfdl.noaa...les/jjp9201.pdf in the Indian Ocean, based from Diego Garcia while I was Meteorologist In Charge of the Navy weather detachment there.


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#4
TheBigOne

Posted 24 June 2014 - 05:07 PM

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Thanks!  I didn't know that.  Pretty advanced stuff!!   When there isn't crap flinging going on this site can be exciting with weather knowledge.    If this forum was taken more seriously we could have more real scientists chime in here but most don't like the meat bees that fly around here.







Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: Atmospheric Indexes, ENSO, PNA, NAO, AO