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  1. I have been posting here now for over a year. Since most you all know each other by name and I am on this forum basically every day, I figured it was time to really introduce myself and give some background as to why I am how I am. So here goes: My name is Daniel. I’m 35. I was born in Miami. After Hurricane Andrew destroyed our house in homestead, we moved to Franklin TN (30 mins south of Nashville). I graduated high school there. I got my love of gardening and weather growing up in the South. Hurricane Andrew started it all. I did 7 years of college back in Florida at the University of Florida (go Gators). Undergrad in Nuclear Engineering and Masters in Medical Physics. Then moved to Little Rock Arkansas for two years of Residency where I met my now wife. My first job out of residency (I work in radiation oncology) was in Naperville Illinois. The wife and I always wanted to live in the mountains of the PNW, even though neither of us had lived West of the Mississippi. Originally we figured Bend was the place to be, but August 18th 2017 I interviewed for my current job in Sequim. We actually came out 2 days earlier and took our rental car down to Mt. Hood to see the eclipse. We moved out here October 2017. The climate took some getting used to. Especially the gardening. My first year I put zucchini and squash out in April . My favorite season out here is hands down Summer. You can’t beat the wall to wall sunshine, long days and mild temps with no humidity. It’s a dream. The worst is winter. I love snow, so I’m glad I’m at elevation, but without the snow the winters here would be impossible to manage. My favorite weather event so far was easily Feb 2019. I’ve never seen so much snow. Close second would be our wedding, June 20th 2021. Just before the heat dome. Anyway, if you got through that wall of text, congrats.
    24 points
  2. Just returning tonight from two weeks in South America. Started out in Lima and then headed to Cusco and saw Machu Picchu. Then flew up to Ecuador and spent the last week in the Galapagos Islands, checking out the variety of protected national park landscapes and endemic plants and animals there. Had pretty nice weather for the most part. The cool late fall nights in the Peru interior got us down to freezing on a couple of mornings, and there was fairly regular mist and drizzle where I was staying in the central part of the islands. But sunny afternoons daily in the dry northern parts of the islands. The early sunsets were a bit of a shock to the system after such long days back home. Would love to spend a whole June-August down in Patagonia one of these years, and get a double dose of winter.
    22 points
  3. Back to civilization now after a successful 12 day climb of North America's tallest peak, Denali, home of some of the most extreme weather on the planet, with my 4 great friends Roger, Matt, Scott, and Aaron. For the first half of the climb we were very lucky with the weather and only needed 9 days to get enough good weather days to acclimatize and summit on the evening of the 20th. After we reached the summit we got about 20 minutes of clear sky -28 degree weather with light wind until a cloud moved in on us. Every day since then has been pretty bad climbing conditions but okay for decending, forecast calls for not a single good summit weather day until atleast the 30th so the 20th was our last summit chance for quite a while. Coolest temperature we observed on the trip was -43 and if I had to guess I'd say the highest wind speeds were only in the 80sMPH, typically you'd experience atleast a couple days with 100+MPH winds. Feeling blessed to have had a successful trip with great weather and no injuries on the team. When I tried to do it back in the late 80s we had HORRIBLE weather for almost the entire 3 week trip and could never summit.
    21 points
  4. 20 points
  5. 37 currently, recorded my first ever June snow shower (in Central oregon) about 40 minutes ago at 36 degrees! Insane stuff for June 15th!
    20 points
  6. Some pics from yesterday’s adventure in the Teanaway — Navajo Peak and a couple others around there.
    17 points
  7. 41 degrees currently, low of 21! Clouds moved in at the perfect time to allow for overnight cooling but prevent daytime heating. Had an amazing climb up the east face of South sister with my son this morning for Father's day. Some of the most beautiful conditions I've seen up there.
    17 points
  8. Nice thru hike of the Enchantments yesterday crazy weather sunny and then heavy snowfall and then sunny again.
    16 points
  9. Nice day out. Not sure if the video will load but saw a big pod of porpoises out here in the Nisqually reach. I see them out here frequently usually but not that many and not typically this close. Was pretty fun. IMG_7878.mov
    15 points
  10. I suppose I should make a similar post too. My name's Todd, I grew up in the amazing town of whitefish montana with 3 younger siblings, I had a constant battle with leukemia for 6 years growing up without much opportunity to just be a kid, which during those boring and awful years I always dreamed of having a life full of great adventures. Graduated highschool in 1983 and then spent the next 9 years living seasonally at different national parks and Ski towns in the USA and Canada taking advantage of the cheap dormitory housing with those Jobs, doing mainly construction and maintenance related work and a few of those years were spent at college. Met my now wife at OSU in 1990 and in 1993 we bought a house outside of Kalispell Montana, in 1995 my first son was born, in 1997 we moved to La Pine Oregon living in a small house for a couple of years while we were getting our house built on the property, which I saved a lot of money by doing most of it myself except the plumbing, elec and foundation, in 1998 my daughter was born and in 2003 my 2nd son was born. During our time in La Pine I started a successful construction business, and in 2015 we bought a lot in Sunriver which I again built most of the house which we then moved into in the fall of 2016. By 2019 I was getting old and tired of construction and passed the torch off to my son to own it after I partially retired, and would work part time as Ski patrol at mt bachelor over the next few winters, and then spent the next couple of winter seasons working as a cook at bachelor, until I retired this spring! I now have 3 grandkids and 1 due in August. Me and my wife are considering moving back to the flathead Valley in Montana, she slightly prefers central oregon and I slightly prefer Montana, main reason it is considered is because my oldest son is moving there and it would be nice to live close to him and his kids. What I'm sure has been pretty obvious with my posts is I am a passionate mountaineer, hiker and climber, I have spent an ungodly amount of my time and money on gear and traveling to destinations for my passion, some of my most notable summits have been Denali and Wrangell-St Elias in Alaska, Chimborazo and Aconcagua in South America, Mont Blanc and the Matterhorn(both in winter) and the Eiger north face in the Alps, have successfully climbed a 5.14a route on the 3000' el cap wall which for the non climbers here anything above a 5.14 grade is an extremely hard climb, and most notably I have done 27940' Lhotse in the Himalayas in May 2022 without a guide or sherpa. I've always been obsessed with weather and have fallen more and more in love with it in the last decade, made my account in nov 2023 but I have lurked this forum since Jan 2020. I REALLY love snow and warm sunshine which is why sunriver is a great town for me, my favorite 2 weather events is the Feb 24th-26th nearly 3' snowstorm and Jan 2024 when we got about 5 feet of extremely fluffy snow in a week, best 2 winters here have been 2016-2017 and 2008-2009, we got more snow in the 16-17 winter but December 2008 is really hard to beat especially with the 20" storm around Christmas with most of my family over for the holiday.
    15 points
  11. Back to the PNW after a lazy return home. If you ever have the desire to chase tornados make Oklahoma City your pivotal point and home base. Most airbnbs and hotels do not have tornado shelters but they do generally have a safe spot…..lol and ouch. Enjoyed numerous storms but tornadoes all touched down around us at night so no visuals. My cousin was a bit nervous when we chased during the day time so I remained a safe distance from all the storms. Unfortunately this hampered my ability to get to the SW corner of the storm for the action. Anyhow, learned a bunch about chasing and had a great time! The culinary experience on the road was amazing as well
    15 points
  12. Beautiful day in the North Cascades yesterday.
    14 points
  13. Gorgeous, fall-like morning on the weather deck.
    14 points
  14. Beautiful day for skiing at Crater Lake. The season never ends! October 2016 is the last month I haven’t skied a day. We’re lucky in the PNW.
    13 points
  15. There's no way... Phil. Get real with us for a moment. You're the guy who literally typed out "5,000-7,000Kybp" instead of "5-7 million years ago" like a normal human being.
    13 points
  16. 64 currently, low of 39. Hiked to the Hayden Glacier this morning, found an ice cave which is a very rare formation around here, I've only ever seen a few before this in the sisters range.
    12 points
  17. 41 currently with an absolutely STUNNING sunset, that's 3 amazing ones in a row.
    12 points
  18. I'm in Ecuador right now and it's saying I must be at least 18 to view the Andrew pictures on my phone. Wasn't even working for me at all in Peru.
    12 points
  19. Got a nice hike in on Hardy Ridge near Beacon Rock yesterday. Quiet out on the trails. Only ran into one other group. Wildflowers and views of the Gorge were beautiful. Temps were in the upper 60s with a nice westerly breeze at the summit of Phlox Point (2,957’)
    12 points
  20. Here’s my 5yr old’s analysis of VP200/OLRfiltered by frequency for MJO/CCKW/LowFreq/ERW.
    12 points
  21. I was able to do all the lawn edging with the weed wacker with no crutches this evening... pretty big achievement for me. Lugging that heavy thing around in the 85 degree sun and sweating and loving it. It's the simple things. My wife is still mowing but guessing I might be able to do that next time around. Just a bit slower than her.
    11 points
  22. Our potatoes are just massive... they seem to like whatever we call this weather. Tomatoes also doing just fine despite the cool weather over the last few days. They are noticeably growing and blooming. I wish we had 19 degree lows though. That would be sweet.
    11 points
  23. The earthquake. @joelgombiner can speak better to this, but in the Seattle area we have multiple faults that cross the Puget Sound that are at various stages of “due” and “over due”, the two that make me raise an eyebrow are the ones that cut Whidbey and Bainbridge east to west and have histories of quakes at the 7-8 range. The Bainbridge (and West Seattle) fault have had a regular history of violent uplifts of several feet at a time. Then there is the subduction zone that is about due for something, either a partial slip or a full rip and slip, but we are not completely overdue as there is evidence in far past that the window was 500+ years or more. If you really want to go down a rabbit hole, look into episodic tremor and slip (ETS). With ETS, you can effectively see the plate move and subduct underneath in on a day-by-day basis. There are some interesting theories in how we might be able to use ETS swarms and periods of inactivity as a way to forecast deep earthquakes or even the much feared Cascadia quake. Yellowstone on the other hand is probably not going to burp for another 200,000 years and will most likely be smaller than its previous eruptions as there is ample evidence that the hot spot has been on the decline for the last 600,000 years. If people are rooting for a volcano, find something in the tropics that could produce a VEI-6+, have a high sulfur and water content, and will erupt between March and May. Sure, there will probably be a period of intense food stress if not outright famine, cost many lives, and maybe cause a global crisis that we haven’t seen in 200 years, but at least we’ll have a few snowy days in both December AND January.
    11 points
  24. Woke up to check for snow, it is 36 currently and it was just snowing pretty heavy for a few minutes, but it's done now, was heavy enough that it briefly sticked to the grass!!! Looks like we might get another shower in an hour or so, but I'm not going to stay up for a maybe shower, we already got our luck for the night to get hit by this very localized shower. Happy Father's day? Thought it was December...?
    11 points
  25. It looked mean coming in but just rain with breezy wind
    11 points
  26. 77 currently following a low of 42, had a big spread 84/29 day yesterday. Had a nice long weekend trip to Southern Washington to go camping, hiking, and boating, to kick off summer break for my wife, who is a teacher. Still a lot of snow at Mount Adams despite it being June, they just hold on to it all year!
    11 points
  27. Just got back. Forum looks entertaining tonight. Let's not make it any more entertaining, please? Someone mentioned earlier about their memorable drive in the snow in February 2019, I think it was @iFred? That reminded me of a story from a couple years back, when I was refreshing my driving skills for the driven portion of my driving test. One of my friends and I took a road trip down to Portland, then east through the Gorge, in the middle of a cold NW onshore flow event. We left late in the morning and drove south all day, without any issue whatsoever, at least until we made it to the Gorge, where torrential rain made it impossible *not* to hydroplane faster than 40mph. But that wasn't so bad, it rains here all the time after all... Just slowing down fixed the issue. The real fun began when we were hooking it back north into Ellensburg. The drive on highway 97 from the Gorge to Ellensburg itself was mostly dry, with a few flurries strewn about as the evening sun expired and colder air filtered in overhead. But when we passed Ellensburg on westbound I90, conditions deteriorated fast. Be it the fading sunlight or the arrival of a substantial convective band, or both, what was once a bare freeway now transformed into miles of unplowed dust. We were turned around by freeway closure signs in Cle Elum, and after a few moments of deliberation, the two of us made the difficult decision to turn around and retrace our steps back to Seattle then and there, instead of seeking refuge in Cle Elum itself, since I had work the following day at 7am. Of course the implications of that being an eight hour drive back over the same long stretch of roads, this time with a whole gauntlet of driving hours already under my belt leaving me already exhausted, as well as absolutely no sunshine to offer a distracting landscape to keep me entertained... And let's just say the friend I brought along wasn't much of a talker, so I had not much company in that aspect, either. Driving back east to Ellensburg through the freshly fallen snow.... Now that's a memory I cherish. We were, quite literally, the only ones out on westbound I90 that night. Not only that, but we were also the only ones who *had* been out there, meaning that as we drove through the freshly falling snow, we were also breaking new trail. Sheets of crystalline drove their way to earth in curtains, illuminated for hundreds of feet by two headlights in the vast darkness. Since we could see the sides of the road so clearly, and we had no other cars to worry about, we had a grand old time swerving and breaking, and having a total hoot and holler of a time... Dancing in a car, in the snow, on the interstate, completely alone. Like little kids. It may never happen to me ever again. The best part was that the snow that was falling was powdery, and compacted well into a grippy surface for my car to realize, so we didn't feel like we were out of control while doing all this. The rest of the drive home was similarly eventful, though I don't want to bore everyone with nine more rushed paragraphs. Long story short, we did some 20F stargazing on highway 97 near Status Pass with the milky way right over us. In Chehalis we endured two hours of white knuckle driving in a surprise precip-driven wet snow event. That snow was not the Disneyland powder adventure of eastern WA. This was a 33F ice rink in headlight to headlight traffic. Not for the faint of heart. But great practice. Oh, and I got home in time for work. No literally, on the dot. I didn't get any sleep that night. Worth it.
    11 points
  28. Despite jim insisting many times that this storm was an underperformer…atleast here we’ve had 1.19” in the last 20 hours. Maybe there was more shadowing in other places in the central sound. Woke up around 3am to strong wind gusts and very heavy rain. Lots of tree branches breaking. There was a lot of debris and branches I saw in Tacoma. On the way into work in snoqualmie there was a few downed trees blocking Highway 18 that got cleared out just before I got here.
    11 points
  29. A perfect afternoon for a hike in the Oregon Badlands. 70 and sunny with a light breeze. Only a handful of days left before this becomes too hot for a day hike.
    11 points
  30. It was the nice that the sun came out this afternoon. My wife and I were on the deck having a drink and I just surprised her by walking across the entire deck unassisted with no crutches. Something I had worked in PT yesterday. I don't walk very fast yet but just to be able to walk at all feels so nice.
    11 points
  31. Just kind of a random factoid for the day. Did any of you know that King County has an extinct stratovolcano? It turns out that Mount Hinman and Mount Daniel are the remnants of what was once a large volcano. Those mountains contain King Counties only glaciers as well. Pretty wild to think the same county that has Seattle also has glaciers. The geology of this state never stops surprising me. It turns out that Goat Rocks between Mount Adams and Rainier is also an extinct volcano that they think was larger than Rainier at one time.
    11 points
  32. This summer is looking amazing so far on the models. No death ridges in sight yet. The last month has been beautiful with reasonable balancing between toughing and sunny/warm days.
    10 points
  33. Although I’ve been on this highway (Trans Canada) countless times, it’s still incredibly that you go from Rockies to prairies in less than an hour. These pics were taken only an hour apart.
    10 points
  34. It snowed in Butte today. Butte, at nearly 6k feet, is a summer snow magnet.
    10 points
  35. Another pic, snow at the golf course! If only it had started sticking!
    10 points
  36. I submitted for his ban, should get approved by EoD. I just need sign-off from the rest of the team. Folks need to understand that we are a serious place for a serious discussion that requires an understand degree of understanding of our climate and the nuances that come with it. @MossMan if you continue to post without a public apology to @Cascadia_Wx, we will be forced to take legal action against you and your family.
    10 points
  37. Blizzard conditions at 9,000 ft on Mount Rainier
    10 points
  38. Ended up with a cool and wet 60/56 spread yesterday. Picked up over .70”of rainfall, the heaviest periods being the early afternoon and later in the evening with steel gray clouds, light rain, and a breezy SSW wind throughout. Just a great day. I always find the dark clouds bring out the stunningly green landscape better than almost anything else this time of year. Probably helped along by the light of the high sun angles far above enhancing the color. It is very beautiful, if only you have the eyes to see.
    10 points
  39. Beautiful morning up at South Sister, great hiking weather with some fresh snow at the upper 2500ft of the climb. 52 currently at home with a low of 24.
    10 points
  40. I’m not employed as one (yet?) but technically just got my degree this week. At long last.
    10 points
  41. This picture made my iPad smell like menthols and a half of beer left in the center console of a 1986 Ford F-150 sporting a home printed license plate that says “PRIVATE” adjacent to the scraped remains of a Calvin Praying sticker.
    9 points
  42. Beautiful here as well. Regional event.
    9 points
  43. Took advantage of a quiet Tuesday off to get a classic hike in up Horsetail falls to Triple Falls and a little beyond. Made it all the way to the edge of the 2017 burn which surprisingly isn’t too far past triple. Weather was cloudy and drizzly with temps in the 50s, but the forest was vivid with green and blooming flowers. Recovering very nicely from the burn. Creeks were flowing high. Got a little soaked from the wet brush but that’s what waterproof pants are for.
    9 points
  44. That's pretty crazy. We never heard from the friend after he left, so I have no idea what his fate was. Presumably he relocated somewhere, but no idea where. I think it took about 24-36 hours before he found out his mom and little sister survived, and he took off right after he got that news. My wife's main job is going through all of the path reports, flagging cancer diagnoses and passing the information to the appropriate treatment team. I keep reminding my wife that all of the data she is collecting and entering into the national database will hopefully help our kids and grandkids face less of a cancer threat than we are facing, but its still very difficult. I definitely miss thunderstorms A LOT, and fire flies, and Waffle House. The rest of it can sod off! Especially the heat. In Athens I lived in a brick and cinder block duplex with a single old window unit AC mounted in the wall. It had full sun exposure and single pane windows, so it got really hot. I ran the AC at a bare minimum, and it still more than doubled my power bill for little benefit. Instead I would spend a good chunk of my day sitting in a bathtub filled with very lukewarm water to try and stay somewhat cool. Most of my books had water damage from falling asleep while reading LOL! When I did the tobacco farming, I lived in a house with a swimming pool, and the house had A/C and was kept cool, but being outside in July all day was brutal, and when we moved to the warehouse in August, the air ventilation sucked, and it would regularly get up to 125-130+ degrees (people brought in thermometers to confirm). We were given frequent water breaks and frequent opportunities to stand in front of the industrial sized floor fans. Still, you could wring our clothes out on sale days, which were the days we had to work the hardest. And we did it all for $4.25/hour (minimum wage was around 3.35 at the time). I've also helped out on a cattle drive in late November in Montana with the temps hovering in the negative teens and a very stiff wind. I would take that any day compared to working in that D**n warehouse in August.
    9 points
  45. Praise God! I've had enough!
    9 points
  46. 9 points
  47. Typical c-zone day here with blue sky and gusty sw breeze and dark clouds to the north.
    9 points
  48. Check out the firehouse on the ICON. 8” of rain in the cascades. With more to come.
    9 points
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