Jump to content
The Weather Forums

On This Day In History...Major Weather Events in the PNW or West


Recommended Posts

1-2-

 

1899 - After 5 consecutive days of significant snowfall Seattle had 16 inches of snow on the ground and was in the midst of one its all time great periods of deep snow cover.  When it was through Seattle ended up with 10 consecutive days with 10" or more snow on the ground and 15 consecutive days of 1" or more.  This event still stands as the longest stretch of days with 10 inches or more snow on the ground for the city.  Below is a list of the days that had snowfall and snow on the ground with depths.

 

12/29- 4.0 .... 4

12/30- 3.0 .... 7

12/31- 5.0 ... 12

   1/1 - 5.0 ... 12

   1/2 - 5.0 ... 16

   1/3 - ......... 12

   1/4 - ......... 10

   1/5 - 2.0 ... 12

   1/6 - 5.0 ... 17

   1/7 - ......... 17

    1/8 - ........ 15

    1/9 - ........ 12

   1/10 - ......... 7

   1/11 - ......... 3

   1/12 - ......... 1

 

Another great winter in the amazing 1890s! 

 

Awesome stretch. I've read that snow was 30" deep half a mile from the Hood Canal, in the Brinnon area. Brinnon itself had 23" fall from the 31st - 2nd. 

 

The Arctic gravy train that fueled our snows went on to produce the Manitoba provincial record low, -63F on 1-9-1899 at Norway House.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 971
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

I just want to say thank you to Demitri, Justin, Jim, and all others who are contributing to this thread. I’m learning a ton of fascinating information.

Incredible low level Fraser River push on this day in 1985. SEA had a midnight high of 35 and temps quickly tumbled as the front moved in, with a daytime high of just 21. To the north, near all time r

An even more impressive PNW severe event occurred on June 2-3, 1894, also during the midst of the most severe flood event on record in Portland.   As with our other severe events, a strong marine push

Posted Images

Awesome stretch. I've read that snow was 30" deep half a mile from the Hood Canal, in the Brinnon area. Brinnon itself had 23" fall from the 31st - 2nd. 

 

The Arctic gravy train that fueled our snows went on to produce the Manitoba provincial record low, -63F on 1-9-1899 at Norway House.

 

And then we had the epic February cold wave.  To me it's a toss up between the 1880s and 1890s for most incredible decade.  The 1860s had some awesome winters too, but also some duds.

Death To Warm Anomalies!

 

Winter 2020-21 stats

 

Total Snowfall = 7.0"

Day with 1" or more snow depth = 5

Total Hail = 0.0"

Coldest Low = 23

Lows 32 or below = 35

Highs 32 or below = 2

Lows 20 or below = 0

Highs 40 or below = 5

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

You also had a decent arctic airmass in December 1921, the major arctic event at the start of 1924, and some impressive "offseason" airmasses like October 1919, September 1926, and late March-early April 1936.

 

For sure.  I definitely should have listed December 1921.  1921-22 and 1922-23 was an insanely great pair of winters in this local area.

Death To Warm Anomalies!

 

Winter 2020-21 stats

 

Total Snowfall = 7.0"

Day with 1" or more snow depth = 5

Total Hail = 0.0"

Coldest Low = 23

Lows 32 or below = 35

Highs 32 or below = 2

Lows 20 or below = 0

Highs 40 or below = 5

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

And then we had the epic February cold wave.  To me it's a toss up between the 1880s and 1890s for most incredible decade.  The 1860s had some awesome winters too, but also some duds.

 

For the Willamette Valley I think it is the 1880s hands down.

Snowfall                                  Precip

2020-21: 9.8"                        2020-21: 40.47"

2019-20: 23.5"                   2019-20: 58.54"

2018-19: 63.5"                   2018-19: 66.33"

2017-18: 30.3"                   2017-18: 59.83"

2016-17: 49.2"                   2016-17: 97.58"

2015-16: 11.75"                 2015-16: 68.67"

2014-15: 3.5"
2013-14: 11.75"                  2013-14: 62.30
2012-13: 16.75"                 2012-13: 78.45  

2011-12: 98.5"                   2011-12: 92.67"

 

It's always sunny at Winters Hill! 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

And then we had the epic February cold wave.  To me it's a toss up between the 1880s and 1890s for most incredible decade.  The 1860s had some awesome winters too, but also some duds.

 

The 1850s were pretty d**n consistent as well, but even they had a couple of clunkers. And probably nothing as snowy as 1889-90 and definitely not 1892-93.

 

1849-50: Very cold December and March, looks like a fair amount of snow. Snowy Fraser River outflow event in late January.

1850-51: Only one minor arctic airmass in January.

1851-52: Fairly quiet as well, some fake-ish December cold but then a big wet snowstorm at the start of March.

1852-53: Epic two week stretch of cold in December. Massive snowfall right before Christmas.

1853-54: Epic 3-4 week stretch in January of cold, subzero around Vancouver. Fairly nice snowstorm as well. 

1854-55: Mild winter throughout, no significant snow!

1855-56: Epic cold/snowy December with more subzero temps at Fort Vancouver. Very front-loaded though.

1856-57: Nice cool/snowy December and another epic January. Major snowstorm right in the middle of arctic blast.

1857-58: Epic mid February snowstorm and arctic airmass, like 1923 but even better.

1858-59: Chilly throughout with occasional snows. Nice arctic outbreak in early December.

1859-60: Epic cold November/December. Looks like a decent amount of snow.

Link to post
Share on other sites

For the Willamette Valley I think it is the 1880s hands down.

 

The one thing that could tip it for the 1880s for Seattle is the ridiculous snowfall in January 1880, but the 1890s were so amazing.

Death To Warm Anomalies!

 

Winter 2020-21 stats

 

Total Snowfall = 7.0"

Day with 1" or more snow depth = 5

Total Hail = 0.0"

Coldest Low = 23

Lows 32 or below = 35

Highs 32 or below = 2

Lows 20 or below = 0

Highs 40 or below = 5

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

The 1850s were pretty d**n consistent as well, but even they had a couple of clunkers. And probably nothing as snowy as 1889-90 and definitely not 1892-93.

 

1849-50: Very cold December and March, looks like a fair amount of snow. Snowy Fraser River outflow event in late January.

1850-51: Only one minor arctic airmass in January.

1851-52: Fairly quiet as well, some fake-ish December cold but then a big wet snowstorm at the start of March.

1852-53: Epic two week stretch of cold in December. Massive snowfall right before Christmas.

1853-54: Epic 3-4 week stretch in January of cold, subzero around Vancouver. Fairly nice snowstorm as well. 

1854-55: Mild winter throughout, no significant snow!

1855-56: Epic cold/snowy December with more subzero temps at Fort Vancouver. Very front-loaded though.

1856-57: Nice cool/snowy December and another epic January. Major snowstorm right in the middle of arctic blast.

1857-58: Epic mid February snowstorm and arctic airmass, like 1923 but even better.

1858-59: Chilly throughout with occasional snows. Nice arctic outbreak in early December.

1859-60: Epic cold November/December. Looks like a decent amount of snow.

 

December 1855 is one month missing from the Fort Steilacom records.  In fact all of 1855 is missing.  I think the 1850s and 1870s were the "weakest" decades from 1850 to 1900.

Death To Warm Anomalies!

 

Winter 2020-21 stats

 

Total Snowfall = 7.0"

Day with 1" or more snow depth = 5

Total Hail = 0.0"

Coldest Low = 23

Lows 32 or below = 35

Highs 32 or below = 2

Lows 20 or below = 0

Highs 40 or below = 5

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

December 1855 is one month missing from the Fort Steilacom records.  In fact all of 1855 is missing.  I think the 1850s and 1870s were the "weakest" decades from 1850 to 1900.

 

They have records from that year, but the FORTS inventory doesn't seem to have it.

 

The monthly data that I see from December 1855 shows a monthly mean of 34.3 at Fort Steilacoom with 14.62" of precip. The low that month there was 5. Fort Vancouver had a monthly mean of 28.3 with a low of -1 and 10.77" of precip. Would love to know how much snow fell.

Link to post
Share on other sites

44 years ago today (1/4/74), I cut class at Claremont High School and went to the library, where I could look out the windows and watch snow falling heavily on the foothills just to the north down to below 2,000 ft.  It was a seminal Weather Weenie moment.

Link to post
Share on other sites

44 years ago today (1/4/74), I cut class at Claremont High School and went to the library, where I could look out the windows and watch snow falling heavily on the foothills just to the north down to below 2,000 ft.  It was a seminal Weather Weenie moment.

 

Nice. That's the storm that dumped 9" on Las Vegas. Their greatest 2-day snowfall on record. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

"Ice and snow are almost unknown in Washington Territory". Famous last words from January 4, 1880. The next day? Read about it here: http://komonews.com/weather/scotts-weather-blog/seattles-ultimate-jinx-the-5-foot-snowstorm-that-hit-in-january-1880

 

They were so full of s**t back then!  That was all fake news to get more people to settle here.  The 1870s were pretty lame by 19th century standards, but the 1860s had some very snowy and cold winters.

 

BTW...I have some excellent nuggets and anecdotes I have found about that event in the decades of research I have done about our climate.  I have compiled a good outline that I plan to use in the book I want to write about past events.  The combination of the snowstorm in Western WA and the windstorm in Western OR make that one of the greatest non tropical storms to ever strike the United States.

  • Like 1

Death To Warm Anomalies!

 

Winter 2020-21 stats

 

Total Snowfall = 7.0"

Day with 1" or more snow depth = 5

Total Hail = 0.0"

Coldest Low = 23

Lows 32 or below = 35

Highs 32 or below = 2

Lows 20 or below = 0

Highs 40 or below = 5

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

January 1912 gorge snowstorm.

 

On the 6th-7th, 41" buried The Dalles (20" an 21"). Cascade Locks received 26" in one day (the 6th), with a peak depth of 42" at the end of the event. Hood River reached a depth of 40" on the 7th. A town called Ortley, located at 1,600 feet in the eastern end of the gorge and the location of a COOP station in those days, measured 56.1" on the 6th-7th along with a melted precip total of 5.60". Daily totals were 21.3" on the 6th followed by a massive 34.8" on the 7th. The latter is one of the heaviest single-day snowfalls ever recorded at an official observation site in Oregon. 

 

A severe ice storm affected the Portland area from the 6th-9th, with over an inch of ice accumulation and damages of $200,000, a big number for the era. Downtown also recorded 8.4" total snowfall during the multi-day event. On the 6th, 2.11" of melted precip was recorded along with a temperature spread of 35/28. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

A year ago today we posted a high/low of 27/15. Pretty chilly. January 8th would be our first high above freezing for the year.

 

Record low on this date at Silver Falls is 6 set in 1979. 

Snowfall                                  Precip

2020-21: 9.8"                        2020-21: 40.47"

2019-20: 23.5"                   2019-20: 58.54"

2018-19: 63.5"                   2018-19: 66.33"

2017-18: 30.3"                   2017-18: 59.83"

2016-17: 49.2"                   2016-17: 97.58"

2015-16: 11.75"                 2015-16: 68.67"

2014-15: 3.5"
2013-14: 11.75"                  2013-14: 62.30
2012-13: 16.75"                 2012-13: 78.45  

2011-12: 98.5"                   2011-12: 92.67"

 

It's always sunny at Winters Hill! 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

January 6th 2017, low of -19 with a snowpack of nearly 20", all of which just fell a couple days before that. That was a wild start of the year.

Weather Data for Klamath Falls, OR
-------------------------------------------------------------------
Snowfall (with % of seasonal average)

2010-2011 - 60.70" (168%)
2011-2012 - 49.00" (136%)
2012-2013 - 25.10" (70%)
2013-2014 - 9.05" (25%)
2014-2015 - 2.90" (8%)
2015-2016 - 54.45" (151%)
2016-2017 - 63.00" (175%)
2017-2018 - 18.10" (50%)
2018-2019 - 52.30" (145%)
2019-2020 - 37.00" (103%)
 
2020-2021 - 15.20"
Nov '20 - 00.20" (5%)
Dec '20 - 04.40" (44%)
Jan '21 - 03.50" (29%)
Feb '21 - 07.10" (78%)
 
2021 Thunderstorms
--/--,
 
Biggest Snowstorm - 18.4" (Jan 3-4 2017 - 26 hours)
Top 5 Daily Snows: 12.40" (01/03/2017), 8.20" (11/23/2010), 7.50" (12/13/2015), 6.60" (02/07/2017), 6.20" (03/10/2019)
Honorable Mention: 6.00" (03/20/2012), 6.00" (02/28/2012), 6.00" (01/16/2020), 5.70" (12/14/2016), 5.50" (01/18/2012)
Max Depths: 21.00" (01/07/2017), 18.00" (12/24/2015), 13.00" (01/16/2020), 11.00" (11/23/2010), 9.50" (02/27/2019), 9.00" (02/28/2012)
 
T'storm Days: 10 (2020), 14 (2019), 16 (2018), 12 (2017), 13 (2016), 20 (2015), 21 (2014), 16 (2013), 2 (2012), 12 (2011)
1980-2015 Avg = 12
Severe T'storms: 6 (08/05/2020), (08/10/2019), (08/08/2017), (07/24/2017), (01/19/2016), (08/05/2012) 
"Almost" Severe: 2 (08/10/2017), (05/04/2016)
Vicinity Severe T'storms (close enough to hear, with official severe reports)
(06/26/2017), (08/05/2016), (07/09/2015), (07/05/2015), (06/09/2015), (08/05/2014), (08/04/2014), (08/22/2013), (08/12/2013), (09/12/2011), (09/04/2011)

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Great snowstorm and Windstorm of January 1880

 

January 6-9

 

During this period in January two very powerful low pressure systems tracked across the southern half of Western WA producing one of the greatest lowland snowstorms ever witnessed in a non mountainous location in the lower 48 United States.  Snow depths in some areas of Western WA reached depths in excess of 5 feet and in some extreme cases over 6 feet.  Accounts from the Seattle P-I newspaper confirm that snow depths averaged throughout the city of Seattle were about 52".

 

Storm number one was a strong low pressure system and associated baroclinic band that dumped extreme amounts of precipitation over much of Western WA.  From somewhere around Olympia northward this fell exclusively as snow.  Not only did this storm produce  the greatest snowfall totals (by far) ever seen in Seattle, but it apparently also holds the record for greatest two day precip total ever recorded as well.  My theory is the baroclinic band interacted with nearby Arctic air which caused an unusual enhancement of precipitation totals.

 

Storm number two was an even more powerful low that took a similar track, but produced considerably less (albeit still significant) snowfall for the Puget Sound region.  The bigger story about this storm is it caused a tremendous windstorm in NW Oregon that blew down over half the trees in some places.  The reason this storm caused different results is due to the fact it tracked in on a much different trajectory in spite of the point of landfall and inland track being similar.

 

Below is a chart I constructed for Seattle from that extraordinary month.  It took years to really unravel anything close to what the true numbers might have been for snowfall and water equivalent amounts.  I calculated water equivalent based on the density of snow per cubic which was thankfully provided in the newspaper account.  If memory serves it weighed like 52 pounds per cubic foot!  At any rate based on that and newspaper accounts of the snowfall amounts I came up with what should be a close approximation of water equivalent.  One interesting tidbit in the P-I mentions that one person away from water (presumably on the hill that runs down the east side of the main city) recorded 76 inches of snow in three days!

 

This was truly a storm for the ages.

 

I should also point out the temperatures used for this chart are from Port Blakely which directly west of Seattle on Bainbridge Island, while sky cover and wind are from Olympia.  This is probably the best picture of this month that can be constructed.

post-222-0-92568800-1515361877_thumb.jpg

  • Like 2

Death To Warm Anomalies!

 

Winter 2020-21 stats

 

Total Snowfall = 7.0"

Day with 1" or more snow depth = 5

Total Hail = 0.0"

Coldest Low = 23

Lows 32 or below = 35

Highs 32 or below = 2

Lows 20 or below = 0

Highs 40 or below = 5

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

A year ago today was a nice little snowstorm in the Willamette Valley. Salem and points south saw 3-6” of snow while north into the metro area were mostly 1-3” amounts. Salem and Eugene had highs in the upper 20s.

Snowfall                                  Precip

2020-21: 9.8"                        2020-21: 40.47"

2019-20: 23.5"                   2019-20: 58.54"

2018-19: 63.5"                   2018-19: 66.33"

2017-18: 30.3"                   2017-18: 59.83"

2016-17: 49.2"                   2016-17: 97.58"

2015-16: 11.75"                 2015-16: 68.67"

2014-15: 3.5"
2013-14: 11.75"                  2013-14: 62.30
2012-13: 16.75"                 2012-13: 78.45  

2011-12: 98.5"                   2011-12: 92.67"

 

It's always sunny at Winters Hill! 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Great snowstorm and Windstorm of January 1880

 

January 6-9

 

During this period in January two very powerful low pressure systems tracked across the southern half of Western WA producing one of the greatest lowland snowstorms ever witnessed in a non mountainous location in the lower 48 United States.  Snow depths in some areas of Western WA reached depths in excess of 5 feet and in some extreme cases over 6 feet.  Accounts from the Seattle P-I newspaper confirm that snow depths averaged throughout the city of Seattle were about 52".

 

Storm number one was a strong low pressure system and associated baroclinic band that dumped extreme amounts of precipitation over much of Western WA.  From somewhere around Olympia northward this fell exclusively as snow.  Not only did this storm produce  the greatest snowfall totals (by far) ever seen in Seattle, but it apparently also holds the record for greatest two day precip total ever recorded as well.  My theory is the baroclinic band interacted with nearby Arctic air which caused an unusual enhancement of precipitation totals.

 

Storm number two was an even more powerful low that took a similar track, but produced considerably less (albeit still significant) snowfall for the Puget Sound region.  The bigger story about this storm is it caused a tremendous windstorm in NW Oregon that blew down over half the trees in some places.  The reason this storm caused different results is due to the fact it tracked in on a much different trajectory in spite of the point of landfall and inland track being similar.

 

Below is a chart I constructed for Seattle from that extraordinary month.  It took years to really unravel anything close to what the true numbers might have been for snowfall and water equivalent amounts.  I calculated water equivalent based on the density of snow per cubic which was thankfully provided in the newspaper account.  If memory serves it weighed like 52 pounds per cubic foot!  At any rate based on that and newspaper accounts of the snowfall amounts I came up with what should be a close approximation of water equivalent.  One interesting tidbit in the P-I mentions that one person away from water (presumably on the hill that runs down the east side of the main city) recorded 76 inches of snow in three days!

 

This was truly a storm for the ages.

 

I should also point out the temperatures used for this chart are from Port Blakely which directly west of Seattle on Bainbridge Island, while sky cover and wind are from Olympia.  This is probably the best picture of this month that can be constructed.

 

Wasn't even that cold of a month...

Snowfall                                  Precip

2020-21: 9.8"                        2020-21: 40.47"

2019-20: 23.5"                   2019-20: 58.54"

2018-19: 63.5"                   2018-19: 66.33"

2017-18: 30.3"                   2017-18: 59.83"

2016-17: 49.2"                   2016-17: 97.58"

2015-16: 11.75"                 2015-16: 68.67"

2014-15: 3.5"
2013-14: 11.75"                  2013-14: 62.30
2012-13: 16.75"                 2012-13: 78.45  

2011-12: 98.5"                   2011-12: 92.67"

 

It's always sunny at Winters Hill! 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Wasn't even that cold of a month...

 

Extreme snow event followed by the usual rain and mild weather... 5 feet of snow disappears in a couple days.    :)

**REPORTED CONDITIONS AND ANOMALIES ARE NOT MEANT TO IMPLY ANYTHING ON A REGIONAL LEVEL UNLESS SPECIFICALLY STATED**

Link to post
Share on other sites

Great snowstorm and Windstorm of January 1880

 

January 6-9

 

During this period in January two very powerful low pressure systems tracked across the southern half of Western WA producing one of the greatest lowland snowstorms ever witnessed in a non mountainous location in the lower 48 United States.  Snow depths in some areas of Western WA reached depths in excess of 5 feet and in some extreme cases over 6 feet.  Accounts from the Seattle P-I newspaper confirm that snow depths averaged throughout the city of Seattle were about 52".

 

Storm number one was a strong low pressure system and associated baroclinic band that dumped extreme amounts of precipitation over much of Western WA.  From somewhere around Olympia northward this fell exclusively as snow.  Not only did this storm produce  the greatest snowfall totals (by far) ever seen in Seattle, but it apparently also holds the record for greatest two day precip total ever recorded as well.  My theory is the baroclinic band interacted with nearby Arctic air which caused an unusual enhancement of precipitation totals.

 

Storm number two was an even more powerful low that took a similar track, but produced considerably less (albeit still significant) snowfall for the Puget Sound region.  The bigger story about this storm is it caused a tremendous windstorm in NW Oregon that blew down over half the trees in some places.  The reason this storm caused different results is due to the fact it tracked in on a much different trajectory in spite of the point of landfall and inland track being similar.

 

Below is a chart I constructed for Seattle from that extraordinary month.  It took years to really unravel anything close to what the true numbers might have been for snowfall and water equivalent amounts.  I calculated water equivalent based on the density of snow per cubic which was thankfully provided in the newspaper account.  If memory serves it weighed like 52 pounds per cubic foot!  At any rate based on that and newspaper accounts of the snowfall amounts I came up with what should be a close approximation of water equivalent.  One interesting tidbit in the P-I mentions that one person away from water (presumably on the hill that runs down the east side of the main city) recorded 76 inches of snow in three days!

 

This was truly a storm for the ages.

 

I should also point out the temperatures used for this chart are from Port Blakely which directly west of Seattle on Bainbridge Island, while sky cover and wind are from Olympia.  This is probably the best picture of this month that can be constructed.

 

Pretty amazing that this happened in a month that wouldn't be notably chilly even by today's standards.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Wasn't even that cold of a month...

 

Nope.  This was a case of major lows tracking south.  I'm betting Bellingham was much colder with dry blowing snow though.

 

At least there were a couple of solidly chilly days after the snow.

Death To Warm Anomalies!

 

Winter 2020-21 stats

 

Total Snowfall = 7.0"

Day with 1" or more snow depth = 5

Total Hail = 0.0"

Coldest Low = 23

Lows 32 or below = 35

Highs 32 or below = 2

Lows 20 or below = 0

Highs 40 or below = 5

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Extreme snow event followed by the usual rain and mild weather... 5 feet of snow disappears in a couple days.    :)

 

There was actually some still left at the end of the month due to the extreme density of snow pack.

Death To Warm Anomalies!

 

Winter 2020-21 stats

 

Total Snowfall = 7.0"

Day with 1" or more snow depth = 5

Total Hail = 0.0"

Coldest Low = 23

Lows 32 or below = 35

Highs 32 or below = 2

Lows 20 or below = 0

Highs 40 or below = 5

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

December 1879 would have been more to your liking.

 

I think the cold left over from that made the January event possible.  As you might have guessed it's been pretty well proven that was a Nina winter.

Death To Warm Anomalies!

 

Winter 2020-21 stats

 

Total Snowfall = 7.0"

Day with 1" or more snow depth = 5

Total Hail = 0.0"

Coldest Low = 23

Lows 32 or below = 35

Highs 32 or below = 2

Lows 20 or below = 0

Highs 40 or below = 5

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Nope. This was a case of major lows tracking south. I'm betting Bellingham was much colder with dry blowing snow though.

 

At least there were a couple of solidly chilly days after the snow.

There was a solid cold snap in SW BC from the 6-11th. With roughly 16-24” of snow. New Westminster had 36.5” for the month and a 31F mean.

 

http://climate.weather.gc.ca/climate_data/daily_data_e.html?timeframe=2&Year=1880&Month=1&Day=7&hlyRange=%7C&dlyRange=1874-09-01%7C1966-06-30&mlyRange=1874-01-01%7C1966-12-01&StationID=812&Prov=BC&urlExtension=_e.html&searchType=stnName&optLimit=specDate&StartYear=1840&EndYear=2018&selRowPerPage=25&Line=0&searchMethod=contains&txtStationName=New+west

Link to post
Share on other sites

January 9-19, 1875 at downtown Portland:

 

30/19

30/18

33/24

26/16

16/4

14/3

20/10

19/9

23/11

18/9

40/13

 

Incredible cold wave.

 

Eola, near Salem, had a 2:00 PM reading of 7 degrees at one point. Fort Canby out on the WA coast spent several afternoons in a row with temps in the 10's. The Oregonian reported -12 in Silverton. Wallula in the lower Columbia Basin hit -26. New Westminster, BC hit -5 and averaged 21.4 for the month. Fort Colville reported four straight mornings in the -30 range, something that has never been repeated in that area. Fort Lapwai (Lewiston) had two mornings at -28 (modern all-time record is -23 in Dec 1919) while the Missoula signal service station hit -34. The initial shot on the 8th-9th also brought readings of -37 and -38 to Cheyenne, WY, the coldest ever observed there. 

 

The lows reported from Fort Benton, MT on January 3-19, 1875 (probably sited too low to the ground, but still amazing):

 

-36

-53

-55

-37

-40

-47

-50

-46

-30

-49

-51

-57

-58

-51

-55

-52

-51

-39

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

January 10 =  :wub: for Clark County

 

2017 and 1998 mostly. 2007 also had a decent event.

 

Snow depth reached 20"+ here locally in 1980 before it started to moderate.

 

And then a major ice storm in 1979.

 

The one day of the month that hasn't gotten totally Aprilfied!

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

January 10 =  :wub: for Clark County

 

2017 and 1998 mostly. 2007 also had a decent event.

 

Snow depth reached 20"+ here locally in 1980 before it started to moderate.

 

And then a major ice storm in 1979.

 

The one day of the month that hasn't gotten totally Aprilfied!

 

Then there was the 1-10-2008 tornado. 

 

I had a business meeting in Hazel Dell right off Hwy 99 & NE 78th that afternoon. About an hour after the tornado hit. I didn't even know what had happened when I drove into the neighborhood. I hadn't checked the weather since earlier that morning. A Chinese restaurant had a tree fall partially on its roof and the traffic lights weren't working. I was like what the hell? I knew the forecast hadn't called for strong south winds, and I hadn't really considered a tornado at that point. The weenie in me was excited but I didn't even know what to be excited about initially.  :lol:

Link to post
Share on other sites

Then there was the 1-10-2008 tornado. 

 

I had a business meeting in Hazel Dell right off Hwy 99 & NE 78th that afternoon. About an hour after the tornado hit. I didn't even know what had happened when I drove into the neighborhood. I hadn't checked the weather since earlier that morning. A Chinese restaurant had a tree fall partially on its roof and the traffic lights weren't working. I was like what the hell? I knew the forecast hadn't called for strong south winds, and I hadn't really considered a tornado at that point. The weenie in me was excited but I didn't even know what to be excited about initially.  :lol:

 

Yeah, I was just close enough to that cell in Vancouver to catch the lightning and some hail, and could tell right away that it had a little more bite to it than our usual cold core stuff. I think that was the only thunderstorm in the area that day, too.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, I was just close enough to that cell in Vancouver to catch the lightning and some hail, and could tell right away that it had a little more bite to it than our usual cold core stuff. I think that was the only thunderstorm in the area that day, too.

 

I love that someone saved a radar loop:

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2008_Vancouver_tornado

Link to post
Share on other sites

A nice event last year, Portland got buried and we were basically right on the rain/snow line at the very southern point of the cold air dam.  As the night went on it got just cold enough for accumulations and we had about 4-5" by the end.

 

Last winter was truly a special one here for the number of times we had measurable snow.  No event brought more than 4" here but 5 separate events was pretty great.  Now it would be nice to have a good 6"+ event as we haven't had one since Feb, 2014.

Springfield, Oregon cold season 20-21 Stats:

  • Coldest high: 38F (Nov 21)
  • Coldest low: 23F (Oct 26)
  • Days with below freezing temps: 36 (Most recent: Feb 24, 2021)
  • Days with sub-40F highs: 3 (Most recent: Dec 24)
  • Total snowfall: 0.0"
  • Last accumulating snowfall: February 27, 2019
  • Last sub-freezing high: Jan 14, 2017 (31F)
  • Last White Christmas: 1990
  • Significant wind events (gusts 45+): 0

Personal Stats:

  • Last accumulating snowfall: February 27, 2019
  • Last sub-freezing high: Jan 14, 2017 (31)
  • Last White Christmas: 2008
  • Total snowfall since joining TheWeatherForums: 20.7"

GoFundMe: www.gofundme.com/CollegeBasketballvsEpilepsy

My Twitter @357jerseys4hope

24

Link to post
Share on other sites

I think January 10-11, 2017 is slightly overrated due to how the event unfolded. It was not expected to be nearly as significant as it was, and it was incredibly intense with the majority of the snow falling in just a few hours. 

 

26815386_10210691533236655_8490473811452

 

Incredible event for the metro area. For the Willamette Valley as a whole February 2014 is probably the #1 event of this century. Dec 20-22, 08 was about Albany north, but even so that covered a much larger geographical area with in general 10-20" totals. 

Snowfall                                  Precip

2020-21: 9.8"                        2020-21: 40.47"

2019-20: 23.5"                   2019-20: 58.54"

2018-19: 63.5"                   2018-19: 66.33"

2017-18: 30.3"                   2017-18: 59.83"

2016-17: 49.2"                   2016-17: 97.58"

2015-16: 11.75"                 2015-16: 68.67"

2014-15: 3.5"
2013-14: 11.75"                  2013-14: 62.30
2012-13: 16.75"                 2012-13: 78.45  

2011-12: 98.5"                   2011-12: 92.67"

 

It's always sunny at Winters Hill! 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I think January 10-11, 2017 is slightly overrated due to how the event unfolded. It was not expected to be nearly as significant as it was, and it was incredibly intense with the majority of the snow falling in just a few hours. 

 

26815386_10210691533236655_8490473811452

 

Incredible event for the metro area. For the Willamette Valley as a whole February 2014 is probably the #1 event of this century. Dec 20-22, 08 was about Albany north, but even so that covered a much larger geographical area with in general 10-20" totals. 

 

Wow, I didn't realize Dewey got screwed so hard with that event.

Low. Solar.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow, I didn't realize Dewey got screwed so hard with that event.

Not sure about that observation. We had a solid 7 inches (that's what she said!) and that was taken on the morning of the 12th. I suppose it's possible because accumulations dropped off just south and east of what is typically considered Hockinson toward Fern Prairie/NW Camas. We're actually in the Battle Ground School District.

My preferences can beat up your preferences’ dad.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I think January 10-11, 2017 is slightly overrated due to how the event unfolded. It was not expected to be nearly as significant as it was, and it was incredibly intense with the majority of the snow falling in just a few hours.

 

26815386_10210691533236655_8490473811452

 

Incredible event for the metro area. For the Willamette Valley as a whole February 2014 is probably the #1 event of this century. Dec 20-22, 08 was about Albany north, but even so that covered a much larger geographical area with in general 10-20" totals.

A lot of things to say about 1/10/17. Overrated isn’t one of them.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

It is interesting how many different events effected the PNW last year and how basically everywhere on the I-5 corridor had at least one significant snow event. Its interesting too how each area had its biggest event on a different date.

 

Salem - 12/14/16

Medford - 1/4/17

Eugene - 1/7/17

PDX -     1/10/17

SEA -      2/5/17

"My Location" - 3/6/17

Snowfall                                  Precip

2020-21: 9.8"                        2020-21: 40.47"

2019-20: 23.5"                   2019-20: 58.54"

2018-19: 63.5"                   2018-19: 66.33"

2017-18: 30.3"                   2017-18: 59.83"

2016-17: 49.2"                   2016-17: 97.58"

2015-16: 11.75"                 2015-16: 68.67"

2014-15: 3.5"
2013-14: 11.75"                  2013-14: 62.30
2012-13: 16.75"                 2012-13: 78.45  

2011-12: 98.5"                   2011-12: 92.67"

 

It's always sunny at Winters Hill! 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

A lot of things to say about 1/10/17. Overrated isn’t one of them.

 

December 20-22, 2008 and February 6/7, 2014 were better overall events. 

 

Not saying it wasn't a great, even epic event for a small geographical location. It was. But we have seen better events even in the past ten years. 

Snowfall                                  Precip

2020-21: 9.8"                        2020-21: 40.47"

2019-20: 23.5"                   2019-20: 58.54"

2018-19: 63.5"                   2018-19: 66.33"

2017-18: 30.3"                   2017-18: 59.83"

2016-17: 49.2"                   2016-17: 97.58"

2015-16: 11.75"                 2015-16: 68.67"

2014-15: 3.5"
2013-14: 11.75"                  2013-14: 62.30
2012-13: 16.75"                 2012-13: 78.45  

2011-12: 98.5"                   2011-12: 92.67"

 

It's always sunny at Winters Hill! 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

December 20-22, 2008 and February 6/7, 2014 were better overall events. 

 

Not saying it wasn't a great, even epic event for a small geographical location. It was. But we have seen better events even in the past ten years. 

 

It wasn't a regional snowstorm, more sub-regional. No shame in that. It was still awesome. I'm sorry you had to miss it.

Link to post
Share on other sites

December 20-22, 2008 and February 6/7, 2014 were better overall events.

 

Not saying it wasn't a great, even epic event for a small geographical location. It was. But we have seen better events even in the past ten years.

You're making a regional assessment. 1-10-17 was a fascinating event. By PNW standards, that was a load of meteorology going on over a 6 hour period. It wasn't just a simple warm advection or frontogenic/coastal surface low setup.

 

It'd be like calling 12-6-13 overrated in Eugene because it too was relatively localized.

My preferences can beat up your preferences’ dad.

Link to post
Share on other sites

You're making a regional assessment. 1-10-17 was a fascinating event. By PNW standards, that was a s**t load of meteorology going on over a 6 hour period. It wasn't just a simple warm advection or frontogenic/coastal surface low setup.

 

It'd be like calling 12-6-13 overrated in Eugene because it too was relatively localized.

It was a great event, not trying to argue that.

Snowfall                                  Precip

2020-21: 9.8"                        2020-21: 40.47"

2019-20: 23.5"                   2019-20: 58.54"

2018-19: 63.5"                   2018-19: 66.33"

2017-18: 30.3"                   2017-18: 59.83"

2016-17: 49.2"                   2016-17: 97.58"

2015-16: 11.75"                 2015-16: 68.67"

2014-15: 3.5"
2013-14: 11.75"                  2013-14: 62.30
2012-13: 16.75"                 2012-13: 78.45  

2011-12: 98.5"                   2011-12: 92.67"

 

It's always sunny at Winters Hill! 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

It wasn't a regional snowstorm, more sub-regional. No shame in that. It was still awesome. I'm sorry you had to miss it.

I agree. I am not motivated in my analysis due to the fact that I wasn’t in the sweet spot. Though I am sure had I gotten a foot of snow I wouldn’t be making these posts. So fair enough. At least I had 2.3” of snow with it. My location was shunked in January 1980 and 1998.

Snowfall                                  Precip

2020-21: 9.8"                        2020-21: 40.47"

2019-20: 23.5"                   2019-20: 58.54"

2018-19: 63.5"                   2018-19: 66.33"

2017-18: 30.3"                   2017-18: 59.83"

2016-17: 49.2"                   2016-17: 97.58"

2015-16: 11.75"                 2015-16: 68.67"

2014-15: 3.5"
2013-14: 11.75"                  2013-14: 62.30
2012-13: 16.75"                 2012-13: 78.45  

2011-12: 98.5"                   2011-12: 92.67"

 

It's always sunny at Winters Hill! 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree. I am not motivated in my analysis due to the fact that I wasn’t in the sweet spot. Though I am sure had I gotten a foot of snow I wouldn’t be making these posts. So fair enough. At least I had 2.3” of snow with it. My location was shunked in January 1980 and 1998.

Well, we don't refer to your location as my location for nothing...

My preferences can beat up your preferences’ dad.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, we don't refer to your location as my location for nothing...

Of that I am well aware.

Snowfall                                  Precip

2020-21: 9.8"                        2020-21: 40.47"

2019-20: 23.5"                   2019-20: 58.54"

2018-19: 63.5"                   2018-19: 66.33"

2017-18: 30.3"                   2017-18: 59.83"

2016-17: 49.2"                   2016-17: 97.58"

2015-16: 11.75"                 2015-16: 68.67"

2014-15: 3.5"
2013-14: 11.75"                  2013-14: 62.30
2012-13: 16.75"                 2012-13: 78.45  

2011-12: 98.5"                   2011-12: 92.67"

 

It's always sunny at Winters Hill! 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree. I am not motivated in my analysis due to the fact that I wasn’t in the sweet spot. Though I am sure had I gotten a foot of snow I wouldn’t be making these posts. So fair enough. At least I had 2.3” of snow with it. My location was shunked in January 1980 and 1998.

 

I think My Location definitely would have gotten snow in January 1980. I've studied that event enough to know your spot probably did alright once the flow turned onshore on the 10th. Even Salem had an inch or two.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

×
×
  • Create New...