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June 2022 - Summer Begins


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  • Longtimer
1 hour ago, TT-SEA said:

Its called AC. 

I don't think you are sleeping outside with 40-degree windswept rain here in the winter either.    Pretty inhospitable out there.    

It's objectively easier to create artificial warmth for yourself in the winter than it is to create artificial cool in the summer.

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Just now, BLI snowman said:

It's objectively easier to create artificial warmth for yourself in the winter than it is to create artificial cool in the summer.

He asked how people survive the warm nights... most people in the SE have AC and they aren't experiencing the warmth outside when they are sleeping.  

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**REPORTED CONDITIONS AND ANOMALIES ARE NOT MEANT TO IMPLY ANYTHING ON A REGIONAL LEVEL UNLESS SPECIFICALLY STATED**

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16 minutes ago, RentonHillTC said:

weird..mine is different

image.png.4641c40bd21ba6ecb29d58bf3c71b22c.png

OMAR COMING! Great show. 

Tacoma WA elevation 300’

Monthly rainfall-3.56”

Warm season rainfall-11.14”

Max temp-88

+80 highs-2

+85 highs-2

+90 highs-0

 

 

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2 minutes ago, TT-SEA said:

He asked how people survive the warm nights... most people in the SE have AC and they aren't experiencing the warmth outside when they are sleeping.  

And what if those without ACs in those climate? You're talking about a tool that most in the 3rd world around tropical climates don't have unless you're in hotels or rich. Again, how they "survive" is to be able to acclimate to the climate they're in. Pretty amazing to be honest. Throw me in that condition and I'll probably book the next flight home. 🤣

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  • Longtimer
Posted (edited)
12 minutes ago, TT-SEA said:

He asked how people survive the warm nights... most people in the SE have AC and they aren't experiencing the warmth outside when they are sleeping.  

Seems like you're being rather pedantic/literal. Obviously he just meant that really warm nights are generally pretty uncomfortable to try to sleep in.

I think most people could agree with that statement, and wouldn't find having to throw an extra blanket on during a freezing winter night to be a great comparison.

Edited by BLI snowman
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2 minutes ago, BLI snowman said:

Seems like you're being rather pedantic/literal. Obviously he meant that really warm nights are generally pretty uncomfortable to try to sleep in.

I think most people could agree with that statement, and wouldn't find having to throw an extra blanket on during a freezing winter night to be a great comparison.

I'll buy a ticket for Tim to VN in this condition and see how long he'll be able to stay. No hotels, welcome to stay with my wife's family.

A population of 90 million people with only 17% of households having AC. 

yuck.png

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  • Longtimer
1 minute ago, Cloud said:

I'll buy a ticket for Tim to VN in this condition and see how long he'll be able to stay. No hotels, welcome to stay with my wife's family.

A population of 90 million people with only 17% of households having AC. 

yuck.png

My uncle told some pretty gruesome stories about sleeping in the heat during his two tours over there. I can’t sleep hot. Humidity can suck it, except for at Phil’s house where 90 degree DP’s should abound.

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My preferences can beat up your preferences’ dad.

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10 minutes ago, Cloud said:

I'll buy a ticket for Tim to VN in this condition and see how long he'll be able to stay. No hotels, welcome to stay with my wife's family.

A population of 90 million people with only 17% of households having AC. 

yuck.png

I’d use a mesh hammock. Would still be uncomfortable, though.

It's called clown range for a reason.

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1 hour ago, Chewbacca Defense said:

I still marvel at how I managed to work agriculture in July, and August in a warehouse  near the Georgia/Florida border.  During heat waves it would hit 120-130 in the warehouse.  We spent a lot of time in front of the giant floor fan and dumped water over our heads.  I guess it boils down to....as someone else said....youth....

It got to the point where they could not get people to work the fields and had to buy machines to do the work.  The machines did not do as good a job as people did, but it was better than nothing.

 

Currently 72 outside and we have the A/C on. My wife and I both work upstairs, and it gets quite stuffy without it.  It's not having to work too hard though...

Why not open the windows?

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36 minutes ago, BLI snowman said:

It's objectively easier to create artificial warmth for yourself in the winter than it is to create artificial cool in the summer.

My favorite saying is you can always add layers in the cold, but you can only get so naked in  the heat before you start freaking out the neighbors!

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1 minute ago, T-Town said:

Between Silverdale and Seabeck there were a bunch of eagles on the beach enjoying (I assume) some shellfish. 

7E87AF41-7928-4793-AF82-0BE12E04C5FD.jpeg

0D591A5F-BC74-4D0A-AF97-1E8765C0EEE3.jpeg

2464B34D-F0E4-40A3-A2B9-B5CAADD911C7.jpeg

B7A6EF7F-18D6-42F3-AC9F-8CB13A18511B.jpeg

Eagles literally out populate all the other birds out there! 

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Tacoma WA elevation 300’

Monthly rainfall-3.56”

Warm season rainfall-11.14”

Max temp-88

+80 highs-2

+85 highs-2

+90 highs-0

 

 

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  • Longtimer
2 minutes ago, T-Town said:

Between Silverdale and Seabeck there were a bunch of eagles on the beach enjoying (I assume) some shellfish. 

7E87AF41-7928-4793-AF82-0BE12E04C5FD.jpeg

0D591A5F-BC74-4D0A-AF97-1E8765C0EEE3.jpeg

2464B34D-F0E4-40A3-A2B9-B5CAADD911C7.jpeg

B7A6EF7F-18D6-42F3-AC9F-8CB13A18511B.jpeg

Pretty amazing how much of a comeback they’ve made in the last 25 years or so.

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My preferences can beat up your preferences’ dad.

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1 hour ago, Chewbacca Defense said:

I still marvel at how I managed to work agriculture in July, and August in a warehouse  near the Georgia/Florida border.  During heat waves it would hit 120-130 in the warehouse.  We spent a lot of time in front of the giant floor fan and dumped water over our heads.  I guess it boils down to....as someone else said....youth....

It got to the point where they could not get people to work the fields and had to buy machines to do the work.  The machines did not do as good a job as people did, but it was better than nothing.

 

Currently 72 outside and we have the A/C on. My wife and I both work upstairs, and it gets quite stuffy without it.  It's not having to work too hard though...

I sweated like crazy. I sometimes marvel that I was never a heat casualty at some point. I used to drink water like a dog. I was always so thirsty. It's amazing what the human body can endure.

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3 minutes ago, Chewbacca Defense said:

My favorite saying is you can always add layers in the cold, but you can only get so naked in  the heat before you start freaking out the neighbors!

Yes, nevermind the complexion of most people this year. It's like a fresh halibut steak.

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36 minutes ago, Cloud said:

And what if those without ACs in those climate? You're talking about a tool that most in the 3rd world around tropical climates don't have unless you're in hotels or rich. Again, how they "survive" is to be able to acclimate to the climate they're in. Pretty amazing to be honest. Throw me in that condition and I'll probably book the next flight home. 🤣

You could adapt. Anybody can. I served with guys from Western Washington and Western Oregon in the South. They all did just fine. Texas natives and people from similar climates had an advantage, obviously.

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  • Longtimer
35 minutes ago, BLI snowman said:

Seems like you're being rather pedantic/literal. Obviously he just meant that really warm nights are generally pretty uncomfortable to try to sleep in.

I think most people could agree with that statement, and wouldn't find having to throw an extra blanket on during a freezing winter night to be a great comparison.

Meanwhile…

https://www.usatoday.com/story/weather/2015/05/20/cold-weather-deaths/27657269/

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My preferences can beat up your preferences’ dad.

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7 minutes ago, Mr Marine Layer said:

Why not open the windows?

We typically don't get much of a breeze in the middle of the day, but if it is breezy that is definitely my preference. 

Other than  that  there are a few other reasons.  My wife deals with patient records all day so she keeps the door closed for HIPAA, preventing her from getting any cross ventilation.  Also, they are building a bunch of condo units about 150-200 yds from her window, so construction noise is going to be a big problem for her until early next year.  Even without construction noise, our neighbor's bedroom window faces her window and is only about 20 feet away.  She started closing the blinds after having a couple of awkward eye contacts with said neighbor.  We will probably be running the A/C during the day then shut it off open windows after she is done working and it cools down in the evening.

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39 minutes ago, Cloud said:

I'll buy a ticket for Tim to VN in this condition and see how long he'll be able to stay. No hotels, welcome to stay with my wife's family.

A population of 90 million people with only 17% of households having AC. 

yuck.png

Why on Earth would you think I would like that?   😃

First of all... not a fan of rain every day.   Not sure if I have mentioned that before.   I would also prefer it not get above 85.    And I assume that is like living in soup.   

So to clarify... because I really enjoy sunny days in the 70s in Seattle you think I want to live SE Asia.    Interesting.  

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11 minutes ago, snow drift said:

I sweated like crazy. I sometimes marvel that I was never a heat casualty at some point. I used to drink water like a dog. I was always so thirsty. It's amazing what the human body can endure.

I did landscaping one summer in college and got severely over exposed to the sun/heat.  We were putting in landscaping for new houses the worst heatwave of the year.  We had absolutely ZERO shade, except for when we ate lunch.  My back was covered with giant water blisters by the end of the week, and I was wiped out for about 3 days afterwards.  After that I had a much harder time handling the heat.  The body can handle alot but I definitely found my limit.  When I did farming, we were out of the sun by 1-1:30 and did projects in the barns and wooded areas in the afternoon.  We also started at first light, so our day was done by about 3-3:30.

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3 minutes ago, TacomaWaWx said:

Getting some 70 degree rain currently! 

Had some of that earlier... but temp has dropped to 65 now.

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15 minutes ago, BLI snowman said:

February 1989 and December 1919 combined couldn't have dreamt of posting June 2021's gaudy death stats.

I survived last summer without air conditioning. There is no way I would have gone without heat in February 1989. 

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16 minutes ago, Chewbacca Defense said:

I did landscaping one summer in college and got severely over exposed to the sun/heat.  We were putting in landscaping for new houses the worst heatwave of the year.  We had absolutely ZERO shade, except for when we ate lunch.  My back was covered with giant water blisters by the end of the week, and I was wiped out for about 3 days afterwards.  After that I had a much harder time handling the heat.  The body can handle alot but I definitely found my limit.  When I did farming, we were out of the sun by 1-1:30 and did projects in the barns and wooded areas in the afternoon.  We also started at first light, so our day was done by about 3-3:30.

Sounds awful. I admire the constitution and fortitude of the early settlers. In modern terms, they had balls of steel.

 

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  • Longtimer
1 minute ago, lowlandsnow said:

If February 1989 happened today it would likely cause more deaths than June 2021.

 

Very doubtful. The homeless population has certainly increased since then, but there's no PNW cold wave mortality precedent for the mortality of last year's heat wave in Portland, Seattle, and Vancouver. Like nothing else really even comes remotely close. And it technically still gets cold enough every winter for the most vulnerable populations to potentially die from exposure/hypothermia, and yet last year's heat wave was orders of magnitude more deadly.

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  • Longtimer
27 minutes ago, BLI snowman said:

February 1989 and December 1919 combined couldn't have dreamt of posting June 2021's gaudy death stats.

I was actually quite surprised by it, although it makes some sense since prolonged exposure to moderate cold would be more deadly than prolonged exposure to moderate warmth. Core temperature is much easier to lower safely compared to raising it.

My preferences can beat up your preferences’ dad.

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25 minutes ago, 1000'NorthBend said:

I grew up in Poulsbo near the Hood Canal bridge, and Seabeck is definitely top tier Kitsap Peninsula, along with the Point No Point area and Port Gamble. The quantity of small lakes south of Seabeck in the lesser populated part of the Kitsap Peninsula is also amazing. 
 

image.thumb.png.f8c8aa8d1b9be3208c3ccda60ddeda24.png

The Kitsap Peninsula was absolutely shredded by the Cordilleran Ice Sheet, and the flow path of the ice is most visible on that part of the Kitsap Peninsula:

image.thumb.png.a29544a3140f61a1ec20d9b816b18fc7.png

So beautiful. 

Over here in North Bend, it's been raining for the past couple hours but remains in the mid-60s. Feels like a rainforest out there, perfect MTBing weather under the trees with water dripping off the trees to cool you down.

The Hood Canal is a treasure. 

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  • Longtimer
1 minute ago, Deweydog said:

I was actually quite surprised by it, although it makes some sense since prolonged exposure to moderate cold would be more deadly than prolonged exposure to moderate warmth. Core temperature is much easier to lower safely compared to raising it.

I'm guessing that study is also including ancillary factors like respiratory illnesses as "cold deaths"? As mentioned in the article, NOAA considers extreme heat more deadly on average in the U.S. as more die per year directly from heat stroke/hyperthermia than outright exposure/hypothermia.

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6 minutes ago, BLI snowman said:

Very doubtful. The homeless population has certainly increased since then, but there's no PNW cold wave mortality precedent for the mortality of last year's heat wave in Portland, Seattle, and Vancouver. Like nothing else really even comes remotely close. And it technically still gets cold enough every winter for the most vulnerable populations to potentially die from exposure/hypothermia, and yet last year's heat wave was orders of magnitude more deadly.

Alright maybe not deadlier than June 2021 but there has not been any arctic air comparable to 1989 in the last decade for instance December 2021 only recorded a 17-degree low at Seatac while February 1989 recorded a high of 18 on the 2nd and a low of 7 on the 4th. 

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1 minute ago, lowlandsnow said:

Alright maybe not deadlier than June 2021 but there has not been any arctic air comparable to 1989 in the last decade for instance December 2021 only recorded a 17-degree low at Seatac while February 1989 recorded a high of 18 on the 2nd and a low of 7 on the 4th. 

Oh, I agree that none of our recent winter airmasses have been comparable, but there were plenty of homeless and vulnerable folks around in 1989 and my understanding is that exposure deaths then (and in other cold waves of the past) were still quite low in the PNW. Ultimately, I think for the most part, that the most severe cold conditions around here just haven't lasted long enough to be comparable from a mortality standpoint and we've traditionally always had the infrastructure to account for those serious 2-3 day cold spells like 1989. The opposite is true with last year's heat wave, when we found that the lack of AC in the big metropolitan areas (particularly BC) was a serious compounding factor in the many hundreds of deaths.

I think another extremely prolonged severe winter like 1861-62 happening nowadays would be a better comparison from a mortality standpoint. Something like that today would put such extreme stress on our infrastructure that it would lead to some massive changes and, unfortunately, a ton of deaths.

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  • Longtimer

Since the fires of September 2020 and the massive ice storm of February 2021, we have tried as much as we can to prepare for an extreme weather event. Something like January 1950,1969, or god forbid 1861-62 would be extremely challenging. It's likely we would be without power for a number of weeks if that were to happen again someday. 

Snowfall                                  Precip

2022-23: 11.2"                      2022-23: 17.39"

2021-22: 52.6"                    2021-22: 91.46" 

2020-21: 12.0"                    2020-21: 71.59"

2019-20: 23.5"                   2019-20: 58.54"

2018-19: 63.5"                   2018-19: 66.33"

2017-18: 30.3"                   2017-18: 59.83"

2016-17: 49.2"                   2016-17: 97.58"

2015-16: 11.75"                 2015-16: 68.67"

2014-15: 3.5"
2013-14: 11.75"                  2013-14: 62.30
2012-13: 16.75"                 2012-13: 78.45  

2011-12: 98.5"                   2011-12: 92.67"

It's always sunny at Winters Hill! 

 

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33 minutes ago, BLI snowman said:

And many others didn't  ☹️

It was arguably more historic and unprecedented in Western Washington and Western Oregon. Forks had never reached 100 degrees in recorded history prior to last year. They ended up reaching 110. Eastern Washington sees highs above 100 every summer.

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2 minutes ago, SilverFallsAndrew said:

Since the fires of September 2020 and the massive ice storm of February 2021, we have tried as much as we can to prepare for an extreme weather event. Something like January 1950,1969, or god forbid 1861-62 would be extremely challenging. It's likely we would be without power for a number of weeks if that were to happen again someday. 

The smoke of September 2020 was one the worst events that I've ever experienced. 😝

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4 minutes ago, SilverFallsAndrew said:

Since the fires of September 2020 and the massive ice storm of February 2021, we have tried as much as we can to prepare for an extreme weather event. Something like January 1950,1969, or god forbid 1861-62 would be extremely challenging. It's likely we would be without power for a number of weeks if that were to happen again someday. 

What about a Carrington Event type of solar flare?

Severe weather events are easier to deal with because it does not effect the entire country and resources can be bought in to help from other areas.    But if the entire world lost power and all communication at the same time?     Bad deal.    And the reality is that it could happen at any time with very little warning.  

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  • Longtimer
5 minutes ago, snow drift said:

The smoke of September 2020 was one the worst events that I've ever experienced. 😝

Getting woken up at 5:30am with a sheriff's deputy screaming to evacuate immediately was one of the more traumatic moments of my life. I won't lie, I kind of froze and started packing a bunch of crap I did not need. My wife got my butt in gear. 

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Snowfall                                  Precip

2022-23: 11.2"                      2022-23: 17.39"

2021-22: 52.6"                    2021-22: 91.46" 

2020-21: 12.0"                    2020-21: 71.59"

2019-20: 23.5"                   2019-20: 58.54"

2018-19: 63.5"                   2018-19: 66.33"

2017-18: 30.3"                   2017-18: 59.83"

2016-17: 49.2"                   2016-17: 97.58"

2015-16: 11.75"                 2015-16: 68.67"

2014-15: 3.5"
2013-14: 11.75"                  2013-14: 62.30
2012-13: 16.75"                 2012-13: 78.45  

2011-12: 98.5"                   2011-12: 92.67"

It's always sunny at Winters Hill! 

 

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8 minutes ago, SilverFallsAndrew said:

Getting woken up at 5:30am with a sheriff's deputy screaming to evacuate immediately was one of the more traumatic moments of my life. I won't lie, I kind of froze and started packing a bunch of crap I did not need. My wife got my butt in gear. 

I remember your posts on here when that fire really started going, I couldn't imagine being there. Thankfully it spared your immediate property.

Weather stats for MBY

Snowfall:

-Total snowfall since joining: 48"

-2018-19: 21"

-2019-20: 2.5"

-2020-21: 13"

-2021-22: 8.75"

-2022-23: 2.75"*

-Most recent snowfall: 1.5”; December 3rd, 2022

-Largest snowfall (single storm): 8.5"; February 12-13, 2021

-Largest snow depth: 14"; 1:30am February 12th, 2019

Temperatures:

-Warmest: 109F; June 28th, 2021

-Coldest: 13F; December 27th, 2021

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17 minutes ago, TT-SEA said:

What about a Carrington Event type of solar flare?

Severe weather events are easier to deal with because it does not effect the entire country and resources can be bought in to help from other areas.    But if the entire world lost power and all communication at the same time?     Bad deal.    And the reality is that it could happen at any time with very little warning.  

Looks like it almost happened in 2012. 
 

 

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37 minutes ago, T-Town said:

Looks like it almost happened in 2012. 
 

 

fascinating. The only thing that gives me hope is that we could hopefully have some lead time on this? Like, a few hours or so to get planes grounded and potentially shield critical stuff etc. Boy what a frickin panic this would cause. 

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5 minutes ago, RentonHillTC said:

fascinating. The only thing that gives me hope is that we could hopefully have some lead time on this? Like, a few hours or so to get planes grounded and potentially shield critical stuff etc. Boy what a frickin panic this would cause. 

Yeah I wasn’t aware of this before Tim’s post got me googling. One more thing to lay awake at night thinking about…

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